So what is the difference between a learning objective and a learning outcome?

Learning Objectives
Learning Outcomes

describe specific, discrete units of knowledge

Example: The learner should be able to change the font of a document in a word processor.

describe broad aspects of behavior which demonstrate a wide range of knowledge

Example: The learner should be able to format a document in a word processor.

describe activities as specific tasks to be completed

Example: The learner should be able to insert an IV needle in an elderly patient.

involve broader skill sets which are transferable to a wide range of work settings

Example: The learner should be able to administer IV drugs to any patient.

can be accomplished within a short time

Example: The learner should be able to sketch an inanimate object sitting on a table.

accomplished over time in several learning experiences

Example: The learner should be able to sketch any visible inanimate object.

do not necessarily suggest that the behavior has been demonstrated

Example: The learner should know how to use a digital multimeter.

refer to demonstrations or performance

Example: The learner should be able to use a digital multimeter to measure voltage, resistance, and current on an AC circuit.


Singing Dogs: Some good and not so good examples of learner outcomes

My favorite assessment joke (yes there are assessment jokes):

Jack: Jill, come here! I've taught my dog to sing!

Jill: Ok, show me.

Jack: Fido, sing.

Meanwhile the dog looks confused and does nothing….

Jill: I thought you said he could sing?

Jack: I said that I taught him to sing, I didn't say he learned it.

Oddly enough, something similar happened to me in real life. My husband sent me a text message saying that he had taught Margot (our dog) how to sing Ave Maria. Needless to say, I didn't believe him but as I look back this activity seems like a perfect scenario to write learner outcomes.

Let us begin with the easy but not very clear option:

The learner (Dog) should know how to sing.

One of the most important parts of learner outcome is that they are measurable. Measuring what someone knows is difficult at best. When writing outcomes, consider using action verbs associated with Bloom's taxonomy. In this case, the action verb is obvious: to sing. If we rewrite our learner outcome using this verb, we get a better statement.

The learner (Dog) should be able to sing.

The next question to answer is when the learner should be able to meet the outcome. Will the dog sing after an hour's worth of demonstrations or at the completion of a term long canine vocal training? In this case, we suggest that it should only take one hour.

Following an hour long instructor demonstration, the learner (dog) should be able to sing.

Adding a time frame is quite an improvement and in many cases would be considered an adequate learner outcome. To truly explain to fellow faculty and to the students what the anticipated outcome is, further detail on the type of demonstration. For example, if the final is the same for all of the students, it can be noted in the learner outcome. This demonstration may be a writing assignment, lab experiment, or in this case the performance of "Ave Maria".

Following an hour long instructor demonstration, the learner (dog) should be able to sing "Ave Maria" in the original Latin.

The above is an example of a good learner expectation. I know that there may be some confusion because I've stated before that learner outcomes should be broad and in this case we are adding more detail. If we look back to our second version of the outcome the goal is for them to sing not to hit a middle C. The activity of singing involves a number of smaller learned concepts which have to put together to be successful. The learner outcome specificity comes not in the activity but in the measure. We can clarify even more by stating the criteria used to determine proficiency.

Following an hour long instructor demonstration, the learner (dog) should be able to sing as demonstrated by videotaped performance of "Ave Maria" in the original Latin which will be critiqued by a panel of expert judges.

Now you can determine whether Margot met my singing dog learner outcome!

Learn how to save money and become more environmentally-friendly through Make Your Own Household Cleaners, a one-hour non-credit class at 9 a.m. on Sept. 18 in Room 138 of the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus of South Arkansas Community College.

The cost is $5, plus supplies. Call (870) 864-7192 for more information.

Federal ARRA logo Some of the facilities, equipment, furnishings, and programs in the South Arkansas Community College have been enhanced or been made possible via funds received under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Arkansas ARRA logo

Winter Concert - 2009

A Festival of Readings and Carols was presented at St. Mary's Episcopal Church.  In addition to holiday musical performances by the SouthArk Singers, reading of seasonal poetry and stories were presented. A reception hosted by the SouthArk Foundation was held after the concert.

Spring Concert - 2009

Mendelssohn's "Elijah" was performed in First Presbyterian Church in El Dorado. "Elijah" is based on the Old Testament biblical prophet of the same name, and was composed in 1846.  The concert featured internationally-recognized organist Daniel Beckwith as the special guest accompanist and mezza-soprano Susan Schafer Hayes, both New York artists.  A reception hosted by the SouthArk Foundation was held after the concert.

Photos from the Spring Choral Concert

 

Funds are presented by El Dorado Jaycees President Ken Bridges, third from left, to South Arkansas Community College Foundation Board President Clara Jones recently for the El Dorado Jaycees Endowed Scholarship. With the two are, from left, Joe McFadden and Lindsey Perry of the Jaycees, and SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones. The $250 scholarship is awarded annually to a SouthArk student.

jaycees_scholarship

Foundation_board

Jane James, center, is a new director on the South Arkansas Community College Foundation Board. With James are, from left, Foundation Treasurer Pete Parks, Foundation executive director Cynthia Reyna, Foundation President Clara Jones and college president Barbara Jones.

Reyna, Cynthia
Executive Director

870.864.7130
FND 102
creyna@southark.edu

Givens, Janis
Administrative Specialist I
I
870.864.7106
FND 101
jgivins@southark.edu

Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 7010
El Dorado, AR  71731
Phone:  870.864.7130
FAX:     870.864.8420
www.southark.edu



HOT SPRINGS—South Arkansas Community College 2009 Academic All-Star Marla Benson of Norphlet, along with the All-Stars from the 21 other two-year colleges in Arkansas, recently learned that she will receive a full scholarship to the four-year university of her choice, which will enable her to complete an undergraduate degree.
The announcement came during an awards brunch, part of the Arkansas Association of Two-Year Colleges annual conference here, and was made by AATYC executive director Dr. Ed Franklin. Representatives of all the state universities were also on hand to begin the recruiting process.
Arkansas Speaker of the House Robbie Wills was the keynote speaker for the brunch.
southark-bensonaward
PHOTO: SouthArk Academic All-Star Marla Benson of Norphlet, right, accepts the award from Arkansas Speaker of the House Robbie Wills.

Student accepts scholarship

southark_foundation_scholie

South Arkansas Community College student Tanya Rice, left, recently accepted the Charles E. Cowger Endowed Scholarship. She stands with Betty Cowger.

winter2009The Winter 2009 edition of The Connection, SouthArk's official newsletter, is now available for download.

You may download your copy below:

pdf The Connection, Oct - Dec, 2009 .

The Alpha Xi Chapter of Epsilon Sigma Alpha International will sell raffle tickets for an original watercolor painting donated by local artist Gail Peppers during the month of September.

The painting will be exhibited at the Alpha Xi booth at the South Arkansas Community College Outdoor Expo on Sept. 12, where tickets may be purchased for $5. All of the proceeds from the raffle will benefit the SouthArk Foundation Alpha Xi Endowed Scholarship.
The 36-inch-by-36-inch framed watercolor piece was custom-framed at Hampton Frame and Art in Hampton.

Peppers is a respected local watercolor artist who said that she “likes to paint the things I see around me with photographic clarity.” Some of her past works include paintings in the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission calendar, and poster artist for the World Championship Duck Calling Contest as well as private collections.

Peppers said “Working on the ‘Sunflowers’ painting gave me great pleasure in knowing it is a way to help our community and ESA.”
Epsilon Sigma Alpha is a leadership service organization with approximately 10,000 members and 1,200 chapters in the United States and abroad. It offers its members leadership training, education and fellowship to assist and enhance their local and national philanthropic work.
“Our chapter members like to have fun in raising money for the various charities we support. Some of the projects we raise money for are St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital, Arkansas Children’s Hospital, El Dorado Boys and Girls Club, UCAPS, Turning Point Violence Intervention, Life Touch Hospice, Salvation Army, Hope Landing, Easter Seals, Hannah Medical Center, Habitat for Humanity and many others,” Alpha Xi member Ann Southall said.” “Our endowed scholarship for SouthArk students is one of our philanthropic projects and we are proud that we can support students who want to get their education close to home.”
The $5 raffle tickets  may be purchased during the month of September from any Alpha Xi member, at Cook's Jewelry or Anthony Forest, or at the Alpha Xi booth at Outdoor Expo. The drawing will be on Sept. 30.

painting_donation

For more information, contact Ann Southall at (870) 814.9024 or asouthall@southark.edu.

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Explore in greater depth courtesy of Don Wheeler and Louisiana Delta Community College

egyptianTALK LIKE AN EGYPTIAN

NOON SYMPOSIUM

Wednesday, January 13

Program begins at Noon

Center for Workforce Development, 3698 E. Main, Room 121

Call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu for more information

Please join us for the first of our exciting new 2010 Noon Symposia Series, “Talk Like an Egyptian”, presented by Dr. Monica M. Bontty.

Dr. Bontty received her Ph.D. in Near Eastern Languages and Cultures from UCLA.  She is an Assistant Professor of History at ULM and an expert in ancient Egyptian language, literature and history.

The published author of several articles and book reviews on ancient Egyptian language and cultures, Dr. Bontty currently teaches ancient history and archaeology. 

Don’t miss this rare opportunity to hear an entertaining, intriguing topic while learning to speak Egyptian!  

 

textbookbuybackThe SouthArk Bookstore provides students with spirit items, college supplies, and of course textbooks. Visit the friendly staff for assistance. Please call the bookstore for assistance at 870-864-7163 or by e-mail to rarnold@southark.edu This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

In addition to textbooks and general school supplies, t-shirts, shorts, hats, book bags, and other supplies are available in the Bookstore. Cash, check, Visa, MasterCard, and American Express are accepted. Used book buy-backs are held at the end of the Fall, Spring, and Second Summer terms. Refund policies are posted in the Bookstore and available by phone.

The Bookstore is located in the Whitfield Classroom Building.

 

Buyback for the Fall 2009 Semester will be held during Finals week. Buyback schedule is as follows:

Monday, December 14, 2009 - Thursday, December 17, 2009:                                                     9:00 am - 12:00 pm                                                                                                           1:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Friday, December 18, 2009:                                                                                              9:00 am - 12:00 pm  

                 

Prices shown in Book List are estimates and subject to change without notice.

 

Bookstore Hours
Monday – Friday
8:00 am – 4:00 pm
870-864-7163

registerDon't forget to register for the Spring Semester 2010. Now is the time! Registration begins Monday, December 14th and run through Thursday, January 7th.

The Spring 2010 Course Schedule

The Spring 2010 Course Schedule contains information about courses offered by the College.
The schedule shows when a course is offered, where it will be conducted, and the instructor.

Note: You may need to refresh the page in your browser or clear your cache to view the latest course schedule.

The Spring 2010 Course Schedule is available in .pdf format, but may not contain recently added classes or course sections

Spring 2010 Schedule Online

Final Exam Schedule

CLASS EXAM DAY EXAM DATE EXAM TIME
MW 8:10 MON MAY 10 8:00 – 10:00
TR 8:10 WED MAY 12 8:00 – 10:00
MW 9:35 WED MAY 12 8:00 – 10:00
TR 9:35 THUR MAY 13 8:00 – 10:00
MW 11:00 MON MAY 10 10:00 – 12:00
TR 11:00 TUE MAY 11 10:00 – 12:00
MW 1:00 WED MAY 12 10:00 – 12:00
TR 1:00 THUR MAY 13 1:00 – 3:00
MW 2:35 MON MAY 10 1:00 – 3:00
TR 2:35 TUE MAY 11 1:00 – 3:00
MW 4:00 WED MAY 12 3:00 – 5:00
TR 4:00 THUR MAY 13 3:00 – 5:00
MW 5:30 MON MAY 10 5:00 – 7:00
TR 5:30 TUE MAY 11 5:00 – 7:00
MW 7:00 WED MAY 12 5:00 – 7:00
TR 7:00 THUR MAY 13 5:00 – 7:00

Spring 2010 Calendar

Financial Aid Priority Deadline November 1
Academic Advising for Current Students
Please see Advisors
November 3-5
Early Registration via Campus Connect November 3-January 7
Payment Arrangements Available Online-FACTS November 3-January 7
New Student Orientation, Advising and Registration January 11
Early Registration Payment Deadline or Payment Arrangements
Deadline 4 p.m. – classes will be dropped for non-payment.
January 7
Regular Registration via Campus Connect January 6-15
Payments or payment arrangements must be made by 4 p.m. on the date that the student registers, or classes will be dropped.
College Closed January 12
On Campus Registration January 13-15
Last Day of Registration via Campus Connect January 14
First Day of Classes Tuesday, January 19
Last Day to Add Classes January 21
Graduation Applications Due February 19
Spring Break March 22-26
College Closed March 24-26
Last Day of Class May 6
Final Exams May 10-13
Graduation Friday, May 14
Grades Available via Campus Connect May 19

gibillAre you waiting for your VA Education Benefits?

The Department of Veterans Affairs has made funds available for Veteran students who are still awaiting their education benefit claim to be processed. Eligible veterans can receive up to a $3000 advance, which will be recouped from future benefit payments. If you are a student who applied for one of VA’s education programs and have not yet received your monthly benefit payment for the Fall 2009 term, you can request a one-time advance payment at your local VA Regional Office or through VA’s website, www.va.gov.

soundsoftheseasonCome join us for our delightful annual presentation of holiday season music led by Victoria Harden and the SouthArk students. The SouthArk Singers will perform along with instrumental music including a guitar, flute and piano. Light refreshments will be served.

Date: Thursday, December 10, 2009
Time: Program is at Noon
Location: 3698 E. Main, Center for Workforce Development

Requires Advance Registration
For more information, call (870)864-7192 or email cd@southark.edu

music-staff

Laura Allen worked in Little Rock, Arkansas for the magazine “At Home in Arkansas” for the past nine years, six of which she was the editor. Laura and her family have moved to El Dorado where she still does some of her own freelance work. Laura was recently featured in a May edition of the El Dorado News-Times for her time with the magazine. Come and hear the ins and outs of what it was like working for a well known magazine.

The symposium will be held at noon in Room 121 of the Center for Workforce Development at 3698 E. Main. The event is free and open to the public but reservations are required;
contact (870) 864-7192 or ce@southark.edu.

Those who attend are encouraged to bring their own lunches. SouthArk will provide drinks and dessert.

November_NS

magazine_editorLaura Allen worked in Little Rock, Arkansas for the magazine “At Home in Arkansas” for the past nine years, six of which she was the editor.

She and her family have moved to El Dorado where she still does some of her own freelance work.

Laura was recently featured in a May edition of the El Dorado News-Times for her time with the magazine.

Come and hear the ins and outs of what it was like working for a well known magazine.

For this noon symposium please bring your own brown bag lunch, SouthArk will provide cookies and drinks. Program begins at noon.

Date: Wednesday, November 18, 2009

Time: Program is at 12:00 p.m.

Location: 3698 E. Main, Center for Workforce Development, Rm. 121

Speaker: Laura Allen

 

South Arkansas Community College recently received a grant from the Department of Health and Human Services and the Health Resources and Services Administration in the amount of $235,620. The Health Care and Other Facilities funds will be used to help with the construction of a 38,378-square-foot health sciences building that will house all of the health programs offered by SouthArk.

Since 1998, assistance provided under HHS appropriations has supported the construction, renovation and equipment needs at facilities such as hospitals, outpatient clinics, skilled nursing facilities, research centers, drug-abuse centers and college academic programs through the HCOF earmarked program. Funding is limited to earmarked entities and the purposes identified in the annual HRSA appropriation.

The total estimated project cost for the new SouthArk building is $8,914,868. Approximately 80 percent of the project cost—an amount of $7,179,278—will be financed by non-governmental sources. The $235,620 federal funding award totals approximately 3 percent of the total costs of the building.

“It is through Congressman Mike Ross’ efforts in this special congressional appropriation and his commitment to higher education that SouthArk was designated as a recipient of these funds,” SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones said. “They will help enable us to provide quality training for health-care professions in a state-of-the-art facility.”

southark-earmarked20funds

PHOTO: U.S. Rep. Mike Ross of Arkansas, center, with SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones, far right, and SouthArk Foundation director Cynthia Reyna.

DuPont El Dorado Plant manager Don Kuhlmann, center, presents a check for $2,500 to SouthArk Foundation executive director Cynthia Reyna, left, and South Arkansas Community College president Dr. Barbara Jones on Monday from the DuPont Community Fund. The grant will be used to help fund the SouthArk Outdoor Expo on Sept. 12. The Foundation, which provides scholarships for SouthArk students, hosts the Expo.

LeBryant Crew, a business marketing major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted the ProMed Ambulance Scholarship for the fall semester. Crew is the son of Wayne and Jenenda Crew of El Dorado and a 2007 graduate of El Dorado High School.
South Arkansas Community College student Marla Benson of Norphlet, center, has accepted the James Family Scholarship from Anne James, left, and Dick James. The scholarship is awarded to a student who is seeking a degree in the accounting field.
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South Arkansas Community College student Marla Benson of Norphlet, center, has accepted the James Family Scholarship from Anne James, left, and Dick James. The scholarship is awarded to a student who is seeking a degree in the accounting field.

South Arkansas Community College student Tanya Rice, left, recently accepted the Charles E. Cowger Endowed Scholarship. She stands with Betty Cowger.

Jeanie Baker, a registered nursing major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted the Employee Club Scholarship to attend SouthArk this fall.

Baker is the daughter of Bertha Mitchell and Ira Baker Jr. and is a 2006 graduate of El Dorado High School.

Georgeanna Jeanette Dickens, a 1972 graduate of El Dorado High School, has accepted the James M. Moore Jr. Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College. Dickens, of El Dorado, is an education major at SouthArk.

Noah Eugene Moses III, a radiologic technology major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted the Employee Club Scholarship to attend SouthArk this fall.

Moses is the daughter of Melanie and Noah Moses of El Dorado.

free_enterprise_dayFederal Reserve Bank of St. Louis representative Billy Britt will be the featured speaker for Free Enterprise Day, sponsored by Phi Beta Lambda at South Arkansas Community College.

The event will take place at 9:30 a.m. on Wednesday at the SouthArk Gymnasium. The public is invited and admission is free.

Britt is the economic education specialist for the Little Rock Branch of the bank. He will discuss the Federal Reserve’s role in the nation’s economy.

Throughout November, PBL and Future Business Leaders of America Chapters across the country note Free Enterprise Day, which celebrates the freedom of Americans to buy, sell and trade without governmental control.

PBL and FBLA are non-profit student organizations that prepare students for careers in business and business education.

For more information about this event, call Dr. Carolyn Langston at (870) 864-7178 or Donna Hendricks at (870) 864-7177.

jointgroundbreakingEEDB given copies of Notice to Proceed for beginning of construction on facility
By: Tia Lyons - El Dorado News Times - Published: 09/23/2009

Mayor Mike Dumas on Tuesday distributed copies of a Notice to Proceed for the multipurpose conference center to members of the El Dorado Economic Development Board.

The memo, dated Sept. 14, authorizes contractor CDI to get started on construction of the more than 50,000-square-foot facility, which will be built on South West Avenue, just south of Locust, across from South Arkansas Community College.

The city of El Dorado, SouthArk and Murphy Oil Corp. are the responsible parties for the $14.4 project, which is largely being funded by the city’s one-cent sales tax for economic development.

Murphy pledged $5 million toward the project, and the money will be doled out upon various phases of completion.

SouthArk will operate and maintain the facility, which will include a banquet hall and a college bookstore, student union and administrative offices. The city and college are working on an O&M agreement.

According to the NTP, Dec. 14, 2010, is the anticipated completion date for the conference center, future change orders notwithstanding. Dumas also handed out a square-footage breakdown for the two-story building.

groundbreaking600Total square footage is 50,764 feet. A total of 29,542 square feet will be dedicated to the city – 27,050 feet on the first floor and 2,492 square feet (mechanical room) on the second floor.

SouthArk will utilize 8,449 square feet on the first floor and 12,773 square feet on the second floor.

Dumas said SouthArk President Dr. Barbara Jones has formed a task force to work on a groundbreaking ceremony for the conference center and the college’s new health sciences building, which will be built just south of the conference center site.

Jones said a formal announcement about the date and time of the ceremony, tentatively set for Oct. 16, is forthcoming.

El Dorado Alderman Billy Blann asked if a billboard will be posted announcing that the site will serve as home to the future conference center, and Jones said CDI will post such signage during construction.

She also said SouthArk plans to display a banner in its gymnasium where large speaking engagements are held.

Alderman Matt Thomas said the El Dorado Advertising and Promotion Commission and the El Dorado Marketing Implementation Task Force are working with the Diamond (advertising) Agency on a design for the type of billboard Blann described.

Robert Dudley, a member of the city’s conference center task force, asked if any architectural renderings of the conference center were on display in any public buildings in the city, and Jones said the college is looking to put a rendering on display following the groundbreaking ceremony.

Robert Reynolds, chairman of the EEDB, said an architectural rendering can be viewed on the city’s website, www.GoElDorado.com. also said SouthArk is working on a job description to hire a manager for the conference center, telling the group that she plans to speak with Dumas about the matter this week.

Jones

“We have to decide if this person is going to be an employee of the city or an employee of the college,” Dumas said.

Prior to the start of the discussion about the conference center, the EEDB approved a request by Richard and Vertis Mason for an extension for an architectural and structural engineering study of the Four-Six building on Locust Street.

On Sept. 8, the EEDB granted the Masons, downtown developers, 30 days to see if the building could be saved and if an alternate use could be found. The building and the adjacent Chinese laundromat were two of the commercial and residential properties the city purchased in the area and planned to raze to make way for the conference center.

However, the Four-Six building was included in the original plans for the conference center. Dumas and Reynolds have said the architects and contractor would like the building removed because it would make for easier access for construction equipment.

The Masons said Tuesday that a Little Rock restoration architect will be in town on Thursday to examine the Four-Six building, and he is bringing a structural engineer with him.

Vertis Mason also said that she has hired a contractor to come up with a cost estimate to raze the building.

The Masons referred to comments made last week by Roger Brooks, who specializes in tourism, community branding, and economic development and who has worked with 800 communities in the U.S. and Canada.

Brooks made a presentation to a roomful of city officials, community leaders and merchants on Sept. 17. He gave his impression of the city and offered ideas and suggestions for improvements.

While in town, he toured the Four-Six building and said it could be used as a public market or serve some other function to work in tandem with the conference center.

The Masons said they have no plans or ideas for the building.

Richard Mason said Brooks made two observations about the building that struck him: there is an expansion of steel beams that creates a total, open space with no columns and if it is used for a public market, renovation costs would be minimal.

“It’s kind of an ugly duckling, I think we all realize that, but it could be the goose that lays the golden egg,” Richard Mason told members of the EEDB.

The Masons said they will be leaving on vacation the first week of October, and they will not have all of the information from the architectural and engineering study to present before then, so they asked for and were granted an extension until the EEDB’s Nov. 3 meeting.

Board member Alan Gober asked the Masons if they would include in their presentation an education on how public markets are run and policed.

More conversation was held about Brooks’ presentation, with Thomas pointing out improvements the city could begin making, at a fairly low cost, on gateways and signage.

Brooks, like others who have studied the community, talked about the need for improved gateways, saying they don’t necessarily have to start at the city limits. He showed examples of how the ideas he presented have worked in other communities in North America.

Dudley inquired about a group that was previously formed to come up with ideas for gateway improvements, and Blann said he sat on the task force, explaining that the group met about three times and came up with low-cost ways to get started.

Blann said the group understood that while there is money in the El Dorado Forward economic development plan for gateway improvements, all economic development tax dollars will be committed to the conference center until construction is completed.

Thomas, also chairman of the EAPC, said the commission has discussed taking over the design phase of a gateway improvement project and possibly focusing on one gateway a year for improvement.

EEDB member Kenny Van Hook said such improvements should be put on hold until the U.S. 167 highway expansion is completed before tackling the city’s east gateways, and Thomas said the group could start on the west, Hillsboro entrance.

Thomas also said wayfinding signs, which were mentioned by Brooks, could be posted at a relatively low cost. The signage could point visitors to the downtown area, the South Arkansas Arboretum, city parks and other such amenities.

Gober said that since the EEDB now has a firm cost for the conference center, he will do a cash flow projection for economic development dollars over the next 15 months “to see how much money we’ll have.”

lottery2Tiffanie Perry of Camden, a non-traditional student at South Arkansas Community College, was among the first-day buyers of tickets in the Arkansas Scholarship Lottery on Monday.

Perry bought two tickets at Missile Mart at the corner of West Avenue and 10th Street here, one of them for herself and one on behalf of SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones. The convenience store is one of many outlets that sell the tickets.

Proceeds from the state lottery go to support scholarships to Arkansas students in state colleges and universities.

Perry’s ticket broke even; she spent $5 and won $5 back, which she cashed immediately. Jones’ ticket did not win money back…at least not directly, she said.
“Each ticket sold in the Arkansas Scholarship Lottery supports higher-education objectives for students across our state...some of whom are right here in our area,” South Arkansas Community College president Dr. Jones said on Monday. “And truly, all of Arkansas’ citizens benefit when the shared goal is to improve education.”
Non-traditional students like Perry, as well as traditional students, stand to gain from the scholarship lottery.

PHOTO: SouthArk student Tiffanie Perry scratches off spaces on a lottery ticked for SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones on Monday

writersinkEl Dorado, Arkansas.  September 30, 2009 - Writers’ Ink, a literary magazine for Union County high school students, will be published again during the 2009-10 academic year.  The English faculty at South Arkansas Community College founded the magazine in 1998 to encourage creative writing in area schools and to provide a showcase for outstanding student writers.
A contest will again accompany the publication of the magazine.  Eighteen cash prizes have been funded for first, second, and third place winners in three literary genres--poetry, essays, and short fiction--in both a junior division for ninth and tenth graders and a senior division for eleventh and twelfth graders.  First place winners in each category will receive $100, second place winners $75, and third place winners $50.  The winning manuscripts will be published next spring in the 12th volume of the magazine with other entries that demonstrate excellence in content and style.  Student authors will also receive free copies of the magazine and an award certificate.  The deadline for submitting entries is February 19, 2010.

Students who wish to submit creative writing should contact their English teacher for information on how to enter the contest.  Students being schooled at home are also invited to submit manuscripts for the contest and magazine by enlisting a high school English teacher in Union County to serve as their sponsor.  A complete set of contest rules, submission requirements, and editorial guidelines are available through the college’s web site under the Writers’ Ink link on the Liberal Arts and Business page under Academic Departments. 

On Tuesday afternoon, October 27, at 4:00, in the Board Room of the SouthArk Administration Building, the college English faculty will host a workshop for Union County high school English teachers to suggest ways for them to involve their students in creative writing.  The topic of the workshop is “Strategies for Writing Personal Essays: A Journalist’s Perspective.”  The leader, Joan Hershberger, reports for the El Dorado News-Times and writes charming personal essays that often appear on the op-ed pages.  She will give the group pointers on how to find good essay ideas in everyday life and develop these topics into interesting, fun-to-read essays.  

On Tuesday afternoon, November 17, at 4:00, Becki Schultz, who teaches English at Parkers Chapel High School, will conduct a second workshop on the topic “Tips for Guiding Students through the Short Story Writing Process.” Ms. Schultz’s students have been entering short fiction in the Writers’ Ink contest for years and have won many prizes, so she plans to share some of her teaching techniques with the group.   This workshop will be held in Room 214 of the Whitfield Classroom Building on West Campus.  Refreshments will be served at both workshops.

For more information, contact Phil Ballard at 864-7156 (FAX 864-7168).

collegenight2Union County College Night is scheduled for Monday, Oct. 19, 6-8 pm, in the SouthArk Gym.

Prior to College Night, there will be an Early Bird Financial-Aid Seminar in the Library Auditorium at 5:30 pm!

Institutions represented include:  South Arkansas Community College, Arkansas State University, Arkansas State University, Arkansas Student Loan Authority, Bancorp South, Central Baptist College, Ed America, Harding University, Henderson State University, Hendrix College, Lane College, Louisiana State University-Shreveport, Louisian Tech Univeristy, Lyon College, Nashville Auto-Diesel College, Ouachita Baptist University, Simmons First Bank, Southern Arkansas University, Southern Arkansas University Tech, U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, U.S. National Guard, University of Arkansas, University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff, University of Arkansas-Little Rock, University of Arkansas-Monticello, University of Central Arkansas, University of Arkansas Community COllege-Batesville, University of Arkansas Community College-Hope, University of the Ozarks, Wesley College

 

July 2, 2009

civitan

Jim Warnock, left, and Scott Walker, third from right, of the El Dorado Civitan Club, donate a check in the amount of $2,000 to South Arkansas Community College in El Dorado. The donation was made Thursday to Cynthia Reyna, second from left, Sue Kelley (Walker), Dean Inman and Dr. Ken Bridges.

June 9, 2009

About 50 health-care professionals from around south Arkansas and north Louisiana were in attendance for Tuesday’s Health-Care Industry Forum, hosted by South Arkansas Community College and the SouthArk Foundation, at the Medical Center of South Arkansas. The forum’s purpose, according to Dr. George Roberts, SouthArk’s dean of health and natural sciences, was for the college to receive feedback from the area’s health-industry professionals in order to further develop program curricula. “Our idea is to be proactive and let you tell us what it is you need from us,” Roberts said, noting that such dialogues are a necessity if success is to be achieved by either the educational arm or the professional arm of the health-care industry. Shirley White, the director of human resources at Ashley County Medical Center in Crossett, told SouthArk representatives that the college is doing a superlative job at educating its health-sciences students. “I’ve learned from the past that you do listen,” she said in the meeting. “Keep up the good work, please.” White’s compliments were echoed by other health-care professionals who were represented, ranging from optometrists to respiratory therapists. “We think we do a good job, most of you tell us that we are doing a good job, in the quality of students that we turn out to you,” Roberts said. Bob LaPage, a health-care consultant at Clements Group, conducted the forum, calling it an opportunity for “alignment” between SouthArk and the area’s service providers. “Today’s session is listening and learning from you as health-care leaders,” LaPage said. Discussed in the forum were both current and future challenges for the industry, as well as changes in health-care demands, in the area. More than 40 percent of South Arkansas Community College students are in health-sciences programs, according to vice president of academic affairs Dr. Val Cantu. “If we have a niche, that’s our niche,” he said. Among other features, SouthArk provides the only physical-therapist assistant program in the region, recently received accreditation for its surgical technology program and boasts the largest enrollment for its emergency medical technician program of any institution in the State of Arkansas. Additionally, a new health-sciences building is set to break ground at the college soon. Union, Bradley, Ashley and Chicot Counties are part of SouthArk’s state-defined service area.

southark-roberts-ferrell-250 southark-lapage-hand-250 southark-white-250
South Arkansas Community College health-sciences dean Dr. George Roberts, far left, greets Medical Center of South Arkansas chief executive America Ferrell, far right, at the SouthArk Health-Care Industry Forum on Tuesday, as MCSA respiratory department director Don Senterfitt looks on. Bob LaPage of the Clements Group, a health-care consultant, moderates the South Arkansas Community College Health-Care Industry Forum in El Dorado on Tuesday. Cynthia Reyna, Foundation Executive Director, greets Shirley White, Ashley County Medical Center human resource director.

 

hazelwoodaward-250May 18, 2009

Dr. Val Cantu, Vice-President of Academic Affairs and Student Services, congratulates Charlie Hazelwood, who was named the South Arkansas Community College Alumnus of the Year during a recent meeting of the Board of Trustees.

bridgesscholarship2-250May 5, 2009

South Arkansas Community College history professor Dr. Kenneth Bridges has established a scholarship in concert with the SouthArk Foundation to cover books, tuition and fees for students who qualify.  Bobbie Smith of El Dorado, a business major with an emphasis in management information systems, recently was selected as the first recipient of this scholarship.  Bridges said, “We lose too many great minds because high college costs force students to drop out.  It is a privilege to be able to help those who are helping build the future.”

February 11, 2009

First_Financial_major_gift_017-500

News-Times/Larry Singer Check presentation Chris Hegi, from left, Steve Cameron, chief executive officer of First Financial Bank, Dr. Steve Smart, John Milam, Bob Merkle, Dr. Mickey Murfee, Knox White, Gary Sewell, Margy Niel and Dr. Alan Rasco take part in the presentation of a donation of $100,000 from First Financial to South Arkansas Community College to help fund the construction of the new Health and Natural Sciences building. The presentation was made Tuesday morning at SouthArk.

simmonsfirst_capcam_giftJanuary 9, 2009

Simmons First of El Dorado recently made a very generous donation to The South Arkansas Community College Foundation, Inc., according to Cynthia Reyna, Executive Director of the Foundation.  The $50,000 gift was bestowed for the purpose of supporting and expanding learning opportunities of SouthArk students.

John Dews, Chairman and CEO of Simmons First Bank, said “Simmons First is committed to education and the difference it can make in the future of our community and its citizens.  We are proud of our partnership with SouthArk and its commitment to bringing affordable and convenient educational opportunities to our community.  This gift moves Simmons First’s investment in SouthArk over the $100,000 level and reconfirms our commitment to the college and its leadership.” 

 “SouthArk Trustees and Foundation Directors acknowledge Simmons First Bank‘s generous support of education in South Arkansas over many years.  In addition to providing a fully endowed scholarship for students, Simmons First has sponsored numerous student fine arts exhibits and concerts, including the Madrigal Feaste and Outdoor Expo, and they have fully equipped a classroom with a computerized teaching piano lab” said Dr. Alan Rasco, South Arkansas Community College President.  “We are proud to have Simmons First as a collaborative partner in providing educational support and other valuable learning opportunities to the citizens of South Arkansas.” 

Seated (l to r) John Dews, Chairman and CEO Simmons First, Dr. Alan, South Arkansas Community College President,

Standing (l to r) Scott Fife, President Simmons First, Clara Jones, SouthArk Foundation board president and Charles Thomas, SouthArk Foundation board member.

groundbreaking3Multi-Purpose Conference Center and Health-Science Center
10 a.m. Oct. 16
Reception at 9:30 a.m.

The public is encouraged to attend this exciting partnership effort between South Arkansas Community College and the City of El Dorado!

Grant for Health-Sciences BuildingSouth Arkansas Community College recently received a grant from the Department of Health and Human Services and the Health Resources and Services Administration in the amount of $235,620. The Health Care and Other Facilities funds will be used to help with the construction of a 38,378-square-foot health sciences building that will house all of the health programs offered by SouthArk. 

 

Since 1998, assistance provided under HHS appropriations has supported the construction, renovation and equipment needs at facilities such as hospitals, outpatient clinics, skilled nursing facilities, research centers, drug-abuse centers and college academic programs through the HCOF earmarked program. Funding is limited to earmarked entities and the purposes identified in the annual HRSA appropriation.

 

The total estimated project cost for the new SouthArk building is $8,914,868. Approximately 80 percent of the project cost—an amount of $7,179,278—will be financed by non-governmental sources. The $235,620 federal funding award totals approximately 3 percent of the total costs of the building.

 

“It is through Congressman Mike Ross’ efforts in this special congressional appropriation and his commitment to higher education that SouthArk was designated as a recipient of these funds,” SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones said. “They will help enable us to provide quality training for health-care professions in a state-of-the-art facility.”

 

PHOTO: U.S. Rep. Mike Ross of Arkansas, center, with SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones, far right, and SouthArk Foundation director Cynthia Reyna.

Charlaine HarrisBest-selling author Charlaine Harris, whose novels are the basis for the runaway HBO hit “True Blood,” will be the first speaker in the 2009-2010 South Arkansas Community College Lecture Series.

“A Southern Novelist Discusses Her Creative Process: An Evening With Charlaine Harris,” a free event open to the public, will be held at 7 p.m. on Sept. 17 at the SouthArk Gym at 300 S. West Ave. in El Dorado.

Harris, of Magnolia, is a Mississippi native who has been writing mysteries for more than 20 years. She published the Harper Connelly series, the Aurora Teagarden series and the Lily Bard series. Those works were well-received.
But it was her novels about Sookie Stackhouse, a telepathic barmaid in northern Louisiana, that skyrocketed her to fame over the last year. After the debut of “True Blood,” Harris’ Southern Vampire novels often occupied multiple spots on the New York Times’ best-seller list at the same time.

“True Blood” was nominated for a Golden Globe for best TV drama last year, and its star, Anna Paquin (who plays Stackhouse) won the Golden Globe for best dramatic actress.
The first book in Harris’ Southern Vampire series, “Dead Until Dark,” won the 2001 Anthony Award for best paperback mystery. She has gone on to publish eight more, translated into multiple languages. A 10th Southern Vampire novel is due next year.

Harris is a member of the Mystery Writers of America and the American Crime Writers League. She is on the board of Sisters in Crime, and alternates with Joan Hess as president of the Arkansas Mystery Writers Alliance.
For more information about this event, call (870) 864-7107.

lottery2Tiffanie Perry of Camden, a non-traditional student at South Arkansas Community College, was among the first-day buyers of tickets in the Arkansas Scholarship Lottery on Monday.

Perry bought two tickets at Missile Mart at the corner of West Avenue and 10th Street here, one of them for herself and one on behalf of SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones. The convenience store is one of many outlets that sell the tickets.

Proceeds from the state lottery go to support scholarships to Arkansas students in state colleges and universities.

Perry’s ticket broke even; she spent $5 and won $5 back, which she cashed immediately. Jones’ ticket did not win money back…at least not directly, she said.
“Each ticket sold in the Arkansas Scholarship Lottery supports higher-education objectives for students across our state...some of whom are right here in our area,” South Arkansas Community College president Dr. Jones said on Monday. “And truly, all of Arkansas’ citizens benefit when the shared goal is to improve education.”
Non-traditional students like Perry, as well as traditional students, stand to gain from the scholarship lottery.

PHOTO: SouthArk student Tiffanie Perry scratches off spaces on a lottery ticked for SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones on Monday

7 Women Who Fear No Art7 Women Who “Fear No Art”
 
An artist reception hosted by the South Arkansas Community College Foundation will be held in the Merkle and Price Galleries at the South Arkansas Arts Center on Saturday, August 8, from 6-8 p.m.
 
Each of the artists approach their work from very different viewpoints, but with one common goal…to create.
Dinah Van Hook teaches art at SouthArk Community College and says she paints when time allows.
 
Sandra Walker is a transplanted Texas artist and gallery owner who loves the creative process of turning her mind’s visions into a complete painting.
 
Mary Staples said, “For someone to appreciate the way I express myself when I paint means so much to me.”
 
Mary Ellen Wilson is a counselor at SouthArk Community College and serves as the “unofficial counselor” for the painters’ group.
 
Pat Daw said, “I lose all stress when I paint; I see shapes and colors, feel the stimulus and respond to the energy.”
 
Rebecca Berzas-Reed said, “I am a multimedia artist. I love all media, from ceramic to watercolor to acrylic to beads. Sometimes I mix it all together.  There is art in everyone. Everyone is capable of art.”
 
Janelle Decossas summed the exhibition up with, “I’m fulfilling an old dream.”

AETN on CampusThe Arkansas Educational Television Network will be on our campus today through Thursday to interview veterans of World War II.

The videotaped interviews will be compiled for use on a Web site, www.intheirwords.org, and possibly for use in later AETN documentaries for televised broadcast.

The interviews will be held in a study room at the SouthArk library. While the set will be closed, library patrons should notice little intrusion. Please thank the library staff for going the extra mile in helping with this worthwhile project.

There is a valid reason why Tom Brokaw termed this generation of Americans “The Greatest Generation.” The United States and the world owes much to these men and women.

Greetings from Dr. Barbara JonesDear SouthArk Faculty and Staff

It is an honor and privilege to be selected to serve as the next President at South Arkansas Community College. I enjoyed having the opportunity to meet and speak with several of you during the interview process. With just a short time on campus, I could recognize easily that SouthArk has a very caring faculty and staff. I look forward to the opportunity for us to meet, visit, and get to know each other better over the next months. I will be on campus to begin the transition process with Dr. Terry Puckett and other College leaders in July. I will begin officially at SouthArk in August.

I will be spending the first few months of my presidency listening and learning about the College and the community. I intend to listen and ask questions so that I may gain knowledge of all that the College has to offer and all that the community needs from our institution. I will be listening to students, faculty, staff, and administrators of SouthArk; Board of Trustee members; community leaders; local employers; elected officials; K-12 and university partners, and state and local agencies. The insight gained will allow me to learn the College “story,” it will allow us to make informed decisions about the College based on the information gathered, and it will enlighten us so that we might work together to develop a clear vision for the future.

I look forward to serving with and for you at South Arkansas Community College. I hope you have a safe and enjoyable summer. See you around campus in a few weeks! 

 

Dr. Barbara Jones

 

June 9, 2009

About 50 health-care professionals from around south Arkansas and north Louisiana were in attendance for Tuesday’s Health-Care Industry Forum, hosted by South Arkansas Community College and the SouthArk Foundation, at the Medical Center of South Arkansas. The forum’s purpose, according to Dr. George Roberts, SouthArk’s dean of health and natural sciences, was for the college to receive feedback from the area’s health-industry professionals in order to further develop program curricula. “Our idea is to be proactive and let you tell us what it is you need from us,” Roberts said, noting that such dialogues are a necessity if success is to be achieved by either the educational arm or the professional arm of the health-care industry. Shirley White, the director of human resources at Ashley County Medical Center in Crossett, told SouthArk representatives that the college is doing a superlative job at educating its health-sciences students. “I’ve learned from the past that you do listen,” she said in the meeting. “Keep up the good work, please.” White’s compliments were echoed by other health-care professionals who were represented, ranging from optometrists to respiratory therapists. “We think we do a good job, most of you tell us that we are doing a good job, in the quality of students that we turn out to you,” Roberts said. Bob LaPage, a health-care consultant at Clements Group, conducted the forum, calling it an opportunity for “alignment” between SouthArk and the area’s service providers. “Today’s session is listening and learning from you as health-care leaders,” LaPage said. Discussed in the forum were both current and future challenges for the industry, as well as changes in health-care demands, in the area. More than 40 percent of South Arkansas Community College students are in health-sciences programs, according to vice president of academic affairs Dr. Val Cantu. “If we have a niche, that’s our niche,” he said. Among other features, SouthArk provides the only physical-therapist assistant program in the region, recently received accreditation for its surgical technology program and boasts the largest enrollment for its emergency medical technician program of any institution in the State of Arkansas. Additionally, a new health-sciences building is set to break ground at the college soon. Union, Bradley, Ashley and Chicot Counties are part of SouthArk’s state-defined service area.

southark-roberts-ferrell-250 southark-lapage-hand-250 southark-white-250
South Arkansas Community College health-sciences dean Dr. George Roberts, far left, greets Medical Center of South Arkansas chief executive America Ferrell, far right, at the SouthArk Health-Care Industry Forum on Tuesday, as MCSA respiratory department director Don Senterfitt looks on. Bob LaPage of the Clements Group, a health-care consultant, moderates the South Arkansas Community College Health-Care Industry Forum in El Dorado on Tuesday. Cynthia Reyna, Foundation Executive Director, greets Shirley White, Ashley County Medical Center human resource director.

 

Mary Pat Cook, the director of the teacher education program at South Arkansas Community College, has received the 2009 Outstanding Arkansas Friend of Head Start Award.

Cook accepted the award last month at the Annual Meeting of the Arkansas Head Start Institute in Springdale. She was nominated by Families and Children Together, a seven-county not-for-profit organization that is a local agency for Head Start.
Cook described her longstanding relationship with Head Start, through FACT, as symbiotic. Her college students often take part in Head Start activities as part of their instructional coursework. FACT, in turn, has hired a number of SouthArk’s educational program graduates.
Cook sits on FACT’s Education Advisory Committee, but she also routinely consults with FACT’s administrators for the college’s program.
“It’s a partnership, and we’re pretty dependent upon each other,” Cook said.
FACT executive director Dr. Brenda Holder said that the relationship between Cook’s program at SouthArk and her institution is mutually beneficial.
“She uses our classrooms as model classrooms for her students, and many of her students go on to become some of our best employees,” Holder said in a nominating essay.

Shaneil Yarbrough, FACT’s education advisor, in another nominating essay spoke of Cook’s contribution to local Head Start efforts.
“When Mary Pat Cook visits an early-childhood program, she is not only there to observe her college students,” Yarbrough wrote. “If the opportunity arises, she will ‘wow’ the children with her creative activities that date back to her days as a classroom teacher.
“With a passion for children and a heart for persons’ seeking a career in early-childhood education, Mary Pat is nothing short of a blessing. If she is needed as a consultant, an ear to listen, a voice to speak or hands to work, she is available.”
Calling child care “the infrastructure of a community,” Cook expressed gratitude for the award.
“This is what I do every day, and it’s nice to be recognized for what you do day in and day out,” she said.
Cook also was named SouthArk’s Outstanding Faculty Member for 2009.
Steve Cousins, South Arkansas Community College Board Chair, has announced formation of the SouthArk Presidential Search Committee. 

The fifteen-person committee is made up of college and community representatives.  The committee will review all applications for the SouthArk presidency, recently vacated by Alan Rasco, who accepted a position with Texarkana Community College effective March 30. 

Within four to six weeks, the search committee is scheduled to submit semi-finalists to the SouthArk Board of Trustees, who will narrow the field to finalists.

Finalists will visit SouthArk and the community and be interviewed in person. Interim President Dr. Terry Puckett, who will facilitate the search process, noted that “While the Board hopes to choose and announce a new president by mid-summer, the most important thing is to find a good fit.  Hiring a new president is the most important thing a college Board of Trustees will ever do.”

Acknowledging the hard work and extensive time commitment required, Cousins said “The Board of Trustees is very pleased and grateful that such high caliber and very busy people have agreed to serve the college on and perform the important work of the Presidential Search Committee.”

SouthArk Presidential Search Committee
Approved by the SouthArk Board of Trustees 3.31.09

SouthArk Board of Trustee Representatives (4)
 
 Trustee Chair Steve Cousins
 Trustee Steve Cameron*
 Trustee David Ross
 Trustee Charlie Thomas*

 Trustees appointed by the Chair

SouthArk Representatives (5)
 
 Administrative Staff  Vernie Meador  
 Professional Staff Becky Riggs    
 Classified Staff Susan Jordan   
 Faculty-Academic Dr. Carolyn Langston*
 Faculty-Technical Mark Nelson

 NOTE:  Staff were recommended by Interim President Puckett who is facilitating
 the President Search. Faculty representatives were elected by their peers; one
 faculty representing academic courses and one representing technical courses.

Community Representatives (5)

 Wayne Gibson* – Murphy Oil Corp.
 Joe Hurst – City of  El Dorado
 Chuck Long – Medical Center of South Arkansas
 Deborah Nolan* – Niehuss Land Co.
 Mark Smith – Mark Smith Communications 

Nominated by the Board of Trustees PSC Process Committee:  John Dews, Sherrel Johnson & David Ross

Ex-Officio Representative (1)
 
 Interim President (non-voting) Dr. Terry Puckett

*SouthArk Foundation Board

April 17

IMG_8776-600 

The SouthArk Singers perform the Mendelssohn oratorio “Elijah” at First Presbyterian Church.

March 19, 2009

Two long-time South Arkansas Community College leaders were honored by the college foundation on Thursday (March 19) with portraits by painter and SouthArk art instructor Dinah Van Hook.
Dr. Carolyn Langston, a faculty member who was the first employee hired at the college when it opened its doors as Southern Arkansas University-El Dorado Branch in 1975; and Charlie Thomas, a former SouthArk professor who is a member of the college’s board of trustees, each received a portrait in a ceremonial unveiling and reception at the home of Foundation Board member Steve Cameron.
Both recipients were deserving of the honor and have demonstrated exceptional support of SouthArk through many years, according to SouthArk Foundation executive director Cynthia Reyna.
“Dr. Langston has distinguished herself through her dedication to student learning, career achievements and professional development, which bring prestige and pride to the college. Mr. Thomas helped lead the campaign to merge Oil Belt and SAU-El Dorado into SouthArk and served as the first chair of the South Arkansas Community College Board of Trustees, where he continues to serve today,” Reyna said.
A 33-year SouthArk veteran in the business department, Langston was the first doctorate-holder on the college’s staff. Hired to teach, she nonetheless worked in a variety of capacities as the institution was being established, including hiring employees and enrolling students, according to Reyna.
Langston’s influence has extended into financial philanthropy as well, as she has established two different fully-endowed scholarships for student learning.

“From her role in the stark conditions of the early days of SouthArk, with a job description that read ‘whatever needs to be done’; to her long list of academic and professional credentials, I see a foundation carefully laid that would support a life and career committed to serving this college and its students,” Foundation Board member John Dews said on Thursday.

Thomas taught anthropology at the school in 1985-’97 and in addition to his SouthArk Board position, has had a lengthy term on the Foundation’s Board of Directors. “I cannot think of South Arkansas Community College—the twig, the branch, or the full-grown tree—without conjuring up pictures of Charlie,” Foundation Board President Clara Jones said before Thomas’ portrait was revealed. “He's been here from the beginning, and I don't think it an exaggeration to say that he's one of a handful of people, along with Carolyn Langston, without whom this college would not exist.”

Van Hook, an art professor at the college for 25 years, worked on the painted portraits over recent months. She called it the high point of her career.  I was deeply honored to have the privilege of painting the portraits of these two outstanding benefactors,” Van Hook said. “Having known both Carolyn and Charlie for many years, I have seen the monumental impact each has had on education in south Arkansas.”

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