"Evening With The Stars" honors "Friends of the College" and recognizes the accomplishments of "Distinguished Alumni".  Please join us in honoring these distinguished members of our community at each year’s event. 

"An Evening With The Stars" - 2012

Saturday, April 28, 2012
6:30 p.m.
El Dorado Conference Center
El Dorado, Arkansas

6:30 p.m. - Cocktails and Dinner - Music by Greg Oden and Friends

7:30 p.m. - Presentation of Honorees

8:00 p.m. - Live Auction

8:30 p.m. - Dance - Music by Keith Owens "Party Machine"

 

For more info, contact Cynthia Reyna at 870.864.7130 or creyna@southark.edu

 

2012 Honorees
 
Honorees for 2012 are:  Jane and D.R. James, "Friend of the College", Patty Cardin and Sheriff Mike McGough, "Distinguished Alumni".

 

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Jane and D.R. James

Patty Cardin

Sheriff Mike McGough

Friend of the College

 Distinguished Alumna

 Distinguished Alumnus

 

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South Arkansas Community College hosted a luncheon reception to honor SouthArk Foundation donors and scholarship recipients. We look forward to acknowledging the generosity of scholarship donors and to give both scholarship recipients and donors the opportunity to meet.

Date: Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Time: Noon

Place: Center for Workforce Development, East Campus

 

pirnique_allan_2For the first time in its 18-year history, South Arkansas Community College will hold winter commencement.

The addition of a second graduation ceremony to the calendar became necessary due to the college’s rapid growth in student population over the last three years, according to administrators. Each of the last several SouthArk classes has been exponentially larger than the previous.

College decision makers felt that having a winter commencement—in addition to the traditional spring one—would better serve both the graduates and their supporters, making it more practical for them to participate in the exercises.

The first ever winter commencement of South Arkansas Community College will take place at 7 p.m. on Dec. 17 at the El Dorado Municipal Auditorium.

The keynote speaker for the event is Dr. Allan Stark Pirnique, who retired from medical practice earlier this year. Pirnique is a Little Rock native who opened his El Dorado practice in 1970, specializing in internal medicine. He moved to the South Arkansas Center on Aging in 2001, where he was the director until his retirement.

Pirnique is a 1964 graduate of the University of Arkansas Medical School in Little Rock with a doctor’s degree and a 1957 graduate of Central High School in Little Rock.

His internship was at Detroit Receiving Hospital in 1964-1965. He spent 1965-1967 as a U.S. Navy medical officer and surgeon, which included time in Vietnam. Returning stateside, Pirnique began a residency at University Hospital Little Rock which would carry into 1970. He was named the Outstanding Medical Resident at the facility.

Pirnique’s professional associations have included the Arkansas Medical Society, the American Geriatric Society, the American Medical Association and the Amercian College of Physicians, among others. His academic writings have been published in numerous medical trade journals and he is an amateur poet, having been featured in editions of SouthArk’s literary magazine Between the Lines.

He also has worked with many organizations such as the El Dorado Chamber of Commerce, 50 for the Future, local chapters of the Boy Scouts of America and the South Arkansas Symphony. He is a member of St. Paul Methodist Church in El Dorado.

Pirnique also is a choral music performer and a member of the U.S. Tennis Association.

He and his wife, the former Jane Kelley, have two children, David Pirnique and Michael Pirnique.
 
PHOTO: Dr. Allan Pirnique

STARS_check_donation

Members of the South Arkansas Community College employee group Support Through Alliance, Resources and Spirit donate $1,000 raised during the annual Taste of SouthArk luncheon to Interfaith Help Services recently. Receiving the check from STARS officer Becky Riggs, third from left, is Interfaith President Mark Day. Also pictured are, from left, STARS member Cynthia Reyna, STARS member Kathy Waldrop, Interfaith Vice President Denise Pesek and STARS member Susan Jordan. Menu items for the luncheon were taken from the cookbook “A Taste of SouthArk,” still available for $15 by calling Diana Hunt at (870) 864-7475.

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Members of the South Arkansas Arboretum Board on Friday break ground on the Arboretum’s new gazebo, a 14-foot-by-14-foot structure that is expected to be complete in about two months.

The gazebo is being paid for by funds from the El Dorado Forward sales tax and will include brick from the Four-Six Building, wrought iron from the Hugh Weatherford Home and tile from the D.R. James Home.

When complete it may be used for parties and weddings, and as a backdrop for photographs.

Autumn at the Arboretum is set for 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Oct. 17 at the South Arkansas Arboretum.

The event will include a Jack-o’-lantern contest for those ages 12 and under and a scarecrow contest for all ages.

Non-monetary prizes will be awarded to the creators of the top-judged Jack-o’-lanterns. There is no fee to enter.

Scarecrow contest winners will be awarded $50 for first prize, $25 for second and $15 for third. Scarecrows must be at least 3 feet tall.

The entry fee is $10. Scarecrows should be delivered to the Arboretum between 2 and 4 p.m. on Oct. 16.

The Alpha Gamma Iota Chapter of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society for two-year colleges will hold its fall induction ceremony for new members at 2 p.m. on Sunday in the South Arkansas Community College Library Auditorium on the West Campus.

Entries are being sought for the creative-writing contest that forms the basis of the South Arkansas Community College literary magazine Writers’ Ink.

The contest is open to all Union County high-school students, and 18 cash prizes will be awarded in three literary genres: poetry, essays and short fiction. First-place winners in each category in both a junior division (ninth and 10th grade) and senior division (11th and 12th grade) will receive $100, second-place winners $75 and third-place winners $50.

The winning manuscripts will be published in the spring in the 14th volume of the magazine with other entries selected by a panel of SouthArk judges. Student authors will receive free copies of the magazine and award certificates.

The deadline for submitting entries is February 18, 2011. Students who wish to enter should contact their English teachers for more information. Home-schooled students are invited to submit manuscripts by enlisting high-school English teachers in Union County to serve as their sponsors.

A complete set of contest rules, submission requirements and editorial guidelines are available on the college’s Web site at www.southark.edu/writersink, where students and teachers also can find creative-writing advice, topics and assignments.

The contest will culminate in the distribution of the new magazine and the cash prizes at the annual awards ceremony in April of next year.

EL DORADO—A new software program recently put into use by enrollment services at South Arkansas Community College in El Dorado will help students and potential students in their search for scholarship money, according to administrators.

The Scholarship Tracking and Review System Online “eliminates scholarship paperwork and reduces the workload for students,” according to dean Dean Inman of enrollment services at SouthArk.

Students fill out one scholarship application, and STARS uses a matching system to link the student’s needs and qualifications to different SouthArk institutional and foundation scholarships.

“Usually within 15 or 20 minutes, the system will recommend scholarships they have a greater chance of being awarded and the student can view, edit and update information at any given time,” Inman said.

That means that students will be much less likely to miss out on applying for SouthArk scholarships for which they might qualify. And with just a few clicks, students can file the one application for any or all of them.

“The software allows the scholarship committee to review all applications on time and rank each individual application; the system then will award scholarships in rank order as long as funds are available,” Inman said.

The system also is a plus as the college continues to become more environmentally “green.” It eliminates required hard copies of paperwork typically required in a scholarship application process.

STARS Online can be found at stars.southark.edu.STARS Online was funded through a U.S. Department of Education Strengthening Institutions grant.

SouthArk’s state-defined official service area is Union, Ashley, Bradley and Chicot Counties.

Writers’ Ink, a literary magazine for Union County high school students, will be published again during the 2010-11 academic year.  The English faculty at South Arkansas Community College founded the magazine in 1998 to encourage creative writing in area schools and to provide a showcase for outstanding student writers.

A creative writing contest will again accompany the publication of the magazine.  Eighteen cash prizes have been funded for first, second, and third place winners in three literary genres--poetry, essays, and short fiction--in both a junior division for ninth and tenth graders and a senior division for eleventh and twelfth graders.  First place winners in each category will receive $100, second place winners $75, and third place winners $50.  The winning manuscripts will be published next spring in the 14th volume of the magazine with other entries that demonstrate excellence in content and style.  Student authors will also receive free copies of the magazine and an award certificate.  The deadline for submitting entries is February 18, 2011.

Students who wish to submit creative writing should contact their English teacher for information on how to enter the contest.  Students being schooled at home are also invited to submit manuscripts for the contest and magazine by enlisting a high school English teacher in Union County to serve as their sponsor.  A complete set of contest rules, submission requirements, and editorial guidelines are available through the college’s web site at www.southark.edu/writersink.  At this same web page, students and teachers may also find creative writing advice, topics, and assignments that will help generate entries in this year’s contest.

The contest will culminate in the distribution of the new magazine and the cash prizes at the annual awards ceremony to be held in April.

For more information, contact Phil Ballard at 864-7156 (FAX 864-7168).

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Representatives of the 71 programs overseen by the Adult Education Division of the Arkansas Department of Career Education, above, including Catherine Garrett of South Arkansas Community College, met the week of Sept. 13-17 at the Capitol in Little Rock in honor of Adult Education Week in Arkansas. General Educational Development Pride Day was on Sept. 15.

Several new non-credit entrepreneurial classes are being offered through the South Arkansas Community College Office of Corporate and Community Education next month.

E-Biz Workshop, with instructor Sherry Howard, is designed to explain how to start an Internet-based business. Basic computer skills and functional understanding of Microsoft Word is required.

The cost is $10. Class meets from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Oct. 2 in Room 105 of the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus.
Your Big Idea! with instructor Orlando Garza is designed to help budding entrepreneurs evaluate their ideas, obtaining licensing information and write business plans.

The cost is $10. Class meets from 10 a.m. to noon on Oct. 2 in Room 121 of the CWD.

The Work-at-Home Woman Workshop is targeted to women who want to start home-based businesses. A panel of women who work at home will instruct the free clinic from 10 a.m. to noon on Oct. 16 in Room 121 of the CWD.

Make Your Mark, with instructor Howard, is aimed at helping small businesses, non-profits, and organizations that operate on small budgets create business cards, brochures, fliers and other print marketing materials. A flash drive and functional understanding of Microsoft Word is required.

The cost is $20. Class meets from 10 a.m. to noon on Oct. 30 and Nov. 6 in Room 105 of the CWD.

DIY Web Design, with instructor Howard, instructs students how to create Web sites with Microsoft Word. Basic computer skills, functional understanding of Word and a flash drive are required.

The cost is $39. Class meets from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Oct. 7, 14, 21 and 28 in Room 105 of the CWD.

For more information about these and other courses, call SouthArk assistant coordinator of Corporate and Community Education Jamie McConathy at (870) 864-8456.

cookbook

The fifth annual Taste of SouthArk luncheon is from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Oct. 11 at the South Arkansas Community College Gymnasium at 300 S. West Ave.

Dishes will be taken from the cookbook “A Taste of SouthArk,” which is available to buy.

Tickets for the event are $8 and proceeds will benefit Interfaith Help Services as well as other community organizations and projects. The luncheon is presented by the SouthArk Support Through Alliance, Resources and Spirit organization.

For more information, contact Val Lewis at (870) 864-7153 or vlewis@southark.edu.
 
PHOTO: Members of SouthArk STARS, above, will host the fifth annual Taste of SouthArk luncheon on Oct. 11. Recipes will be taken from the “A Taste of SouthArk” cookbook, available for sale. Original artwork from the book will be raffled at the event.

Let’s Celebrate! Is a one-day, two-hour course at South Arkansas Community College that is designed to teach participants how to plan creative and memorable birthday parties.

The $10 class is from 10 a.m. to noon on Sept. 25 in Room 121 at the SouthArk Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus with instructor Elaine Strickland, the owner of Special Event Consultants Wedding and Event Planners.

For more information, call Jamie McConathy at (870) 864-8456.

South Arkansas Community College is seeking the names and contact information of living graduates of El Dorado Junior College for recognition at an upcoming event.

The junior college was in operation in the 1920s, 1930s and early 1940s before closing during World War II.

Send pertinent information to marketing and communications coordinator Heath Waldrop at hwaldrop@southark.edu.

The Fairytale Tea Party for girls ages 4 and up is from 10 a.m. to noon on Sept. 18 in Room 121 of the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus of South Arkansas Community College.

Party leader Marta Langston will direct a morning of cooking and crafts. Participants are encouraged to dress as princesses.

The cost is $10 total for each participant and her escort—a mother, grandmother, aunt or someone else.

For more information call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu.

all_02Those who love the outdoors are being summoned to the 12th SouthArk Outdoor Expo, hosted by the South Arkansas Community College Foundation, on Sept. 11.

Demonstrations, games, food, contests and other attractions will be spread across the college’s East Campus at 3696 E. Main in El Dorado.

This year’s headliner is Lucy Mize, a national award-winning Bassmaster angler. The first woman to weigh in on the Bassmaster Classic stage, she has fished professionally for 25 years all across the United States. She is a four-time national champion and a three-time Angler of the Year.

lucy_004"Lucy's the complete package: she's got charisma, a real talent for knowing where the fish are and what they'll bite, and a hell of a competitive instinct,” tournament angler and friend Jay Yelas said. “I've fished with her in tournaments where she'll just bear down and not miss a cast all day. You don't find that kind of mental toughness in many anglers, man or woman."

Arkansas Game and Fish Commission public-affairs coordinator Steve “Wildman” Wilson will be the Outdoor Expo’s master of ceremonies. Wilson’s nickname originated when he became the Commission’s coordinator of Project WILD—Wildlife in Learning Design—a conservation education program.

He began his career with Game and Fish as a hunting safety training officer in 1978, and later was named chief of the Information and Education Division. Along the way, he received the Game and Fish Employee of the Year Award twice, and was the Arkansas Wildlife Federation’s Conservation Communicator of the Year in 1998 and 2009.

Wilson is the host and co-producer of “Talkin’ Outdoors at the Corner Café,” a 30-minute weekly TV program. He’s also the host and producer of “Outdoor Report,” a weekly statewide radio broadcast.

Both guests will be on hand to present seminars and demonstrations, answer questions about fishing and hunting, sign autographs and meet with Expo visitors.

wildman_wilsonOutdoor Expo activities and demonstrations will include bladesmithing, rodeo roping, chainsaw wood carving, model aviation, archery, simulated rock climbing, BB-gun shooting and bait casting, face painting, sidewalk chalk art and others.
Exhibits include the El Dorado Police Department’s robot bomb removal system, David Joyner’s Snake Safety Challenge, Arkansas State Parks’ woodland creatures, Fishers of Men’s fish weigh-in and Ducks Unlimited’s wood duck boxes. A Lifeshare Bloodmobile also will be on hand for a blood drive.

South Arkansas Community College students will sell a variety of breakfast foods, desserts and cold drinks and employees will sell brisket plate lunches. Limited space is available for more vendors and exhibitors; contact Cynthia Reyna at (870) 864-7130, 1-800-955-2289 or creyna@southark.edu for more information.

Back to the Outdoor Expo is the Herring Furniture-Amerigas Propane-Holland Grill Rib Cook-off. Cash prizes and trophies will be awarded to winners, including the top prize of $1,000 to the first-place team. Deadline for team registrations is Aug. 23. For more information, contact Reyna.

The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission is sponsoring a duck-calling contest for youth, adults and adult teams with the top prize of $200 to first place. Registration deadline is Sept. 8. For more information, contact Laura Rogers at (870) 818-6378 or larogers@agfc.state.ar.us.
This year’s SouthArk Outdoor Expo will be dedicated to the nearly 3,000 people who perished in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and in honor of all U.S. armed-service personnel, both past and present.

The event will begin at 9 a.m. Admission is $5 for ages 18 and up, $3 for for ages 12 to 17 and free for anyone under 12. The family rate is $15.

Proceeds from the Outdoor Expo benefit educational opportunities for students and general operations of the SouthArk Foundation.
More information about the SouthArk Outdoor Expo may be found at www.southark.edu/expo.
 
PHOTOS: Mize, Wilson

El Dorado’s famed Hamburger Row will be the topic of the Aug. 18 Noon Symposium at South Arkansas Community College.
From the Garrett Hotel Plumb Down to Skinners Corner will be presented by director Pam Beasley of the Arkansas Museum of Natural Resources in Smackover.

When oil was discovered in El Dorado in 1921, the community did not have the means to handle the huge influx of people who flocked to the area. South Washington Street became an area where shanty huts were erected to accommodate the masses by providing food, supplies and other needs and wants.

This was Hamburger Row.

The event will take place in Room 121 of the SouthArk Center for Workforce Development at 3698 E. Main in El Dorado. Those who are attend are encouraged to bring their lunches with them; drinks and desserts will be furnished.

Noon Symposia are free and open to the public, and are hosted by the SouthArk Office of Corporate and Community Education. For more information call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu.

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PHOTO: SouthArk Upward Bound staff members, from left, Martha Dunn, Debra Mock and Roy Williams, along with the flag and certificates received when the group traveled to Washington.

WASHINGTON—As part of the 2010 Summer Scholars’ Program at South Arkansas Community College, students in Upward Bound traveled here on June 26-July 1.

Participants met with Sens. Mark Pryor and Blanche Lincoln on the steps of the U.S. Capitol, and the flag that flew over the Capitol that day later was presented to SouthArk Upward Bound.

A certificate of authenticity endorsed by American Institute of Architects acting architect of the Capitol Stephen T. Ayers accompanied the flag. Plans for use of the flag are forthcoming.
 

Update on the Archeology at Historic Washington State Park with Dr. Jamie Brandon will be the Noon Symposium on July 21 at South Arkansas Community College.

Brandon is the Arkansas Archeological Survey scientist stationed in southwest Arkansas. Since last year, he has undertaken two major excavations with more digs planned for the future. Brandon will discuss this work, which took place behind the former homes of merchant Abraham Block and politician Grandison Royston.

The free event, hosted by the SouthArk Office of Corporate and Community Education, will be held in Room 121 of the Center for Workforce Development at 3698 E. Main on the East Campus. Drinks and dessert will be furnished by the college.

Call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu for more information.

Digital Cameras 101 at South Arkansas Community College is a one-day class this month offered through the Office of Corporate and Community Education that will cover basics like camera modes and troubleshooting. An outdoor practice session will be included.
Both single-lens reflex and point-and-shoot cameras are acceptable.

The workshop is 10 a.m. to noon on July 24 at the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus with instructor Melissa Laird. The cost is $10 and registration is required by calling (870) 864-7192 or e-mailing ce@southark.edu.

EL DORADO—A wedding planning workshop, ABCs of Wedding Planning, will be held from 10 a.m. to noon on July 17 at the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus of South Arkansas Community College.

Offered by the SouthArk Office of Corporate and Community Education, the $10 workshop will be taught by Elaine Strickland of Special Event Consultants Wedding and Event Planners and will cover basics like photography and wedding cakes. Local wedding professionals will be on hand to offer tips and answer questions.

Space is limited so advanced registration is required. For more information, call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu.

southark-upwardbound

As part of their foreign language class, South Arkansas Community College Upward Bound students perform a French song for residents at Timberlane Rehabilitation Center on Thursday under the direction of Upward Bound staff members Sekou Sangare and April Leamons.

Front row, from left, Gregory Crew, Shaniqua Wilson and Jason Hildreth. Back row, Ceara Jamerson, Zhana Gentle, Dominique Smith, Jasmine Ferguson, Shenequa Moody, Tornell Talley, I’Eisha Shephard and Tyler Steward.

morgan_alexAlex Morgan, a 2009 graduate of Bryant High School, has accepted a Choral Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.
He is the son of Betty Morgan of Smackover.

South Arkansas Community College is seeking input from the community on potential menu items for the El Dorado Conference Center.

The facility will host functions that will require a selection of catering options and will be home to the South Arkansas Community College student center, which will include a cafe. The public will have access to the facility and the cafe will be open to the public.

“We are still in the planning stage of menu design, but didn’t want to move forward until we received some opinions from our student, faculty and staff here at the college, and from the community,” new Conference Center manager Ginny Garner said. “We need to identify some trends on what will be successful.”

The brief survey is available at www.southark.edu/conference.

Cookbook_Paintings_001The South Arkansas Community College STARS (Support Through Alliance Resources and Spirit) organization has collected the best recipes from college staff and faculty, family and friends and compiled them into an attractive keepsake cookbook.  This one-of-a-kind cookbook contains 522 recipes including appetizers, vegetables, main dishes, and desserts.

Profits from cookbook sales will be used for charitable donations to community organizations that support families, children, the elderly and those with special needs.  The cookbook features beautiful and original artwork by Dinah VanHook, SouthArk instructor, and her art students.

The cookbooks are selling for $15.00 and may be purchased by calling Diana Hunt at 870.864.8475 or contacting her at dhunt@southark.edu.  

During July, a series of classes for children called Kid Venture will be offered by the South Arkansas Community College Office of Corporate and Community Education.

Green Thumbs Club, Spanish Adventure, Summer Sparkles, Art Around the World, Music Around the World, Shutterbugs, Cheer Camp, Flag Football Camp and Golf Camp are offered during the month. Dates, times and age divisions vary per class.

For more information call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu. The entire summer schedule is available for download at www.southark.edu.

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Steve Blair

Steve Blair, a 2010 graduate of Smackover High School, has accepted the Trades and Industry Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.

Blair is the son of Steve Blair and Stephanie Brown-Massie, both of Smackover. At Smackover High he was a member of the Future Business Leaders of America, the French Club, the baseball team and the football team.

PHOTO: Student Steve Blair.

“UFOs Over Arkansas: Past and Present” is the topic of this month’s Noon Symposium at South Arkansas Community College, on June 16.
Assistant state director of the Mutual Unidentified Flying Object Network Teddy Sapp will present a history of documented UFO sightings in Arkansas, with a special emphasis on sightings in the south-central Arkansas region. He is a retired U.S. Air Force avionics technician and a licensed private investigator.

Noon Symposia, which are free and open to the public, are hosted by the SouthArk Office of Corporate and Community Education. The event will be held in Room 121 of the Center for Workforce Development at 3698 E. Main. Those who attend are encouraged to bring their own lunches with them; drinks and dessert will be furnished by the college.

For more information, call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu.

Sigma Epsilon, the chapter of Phi Beta Lambda at South Arkansas Community College, will hold a rummage sale from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday at the SouthArk Gymnasium on the college’s West Campus.

Money raised will help fund a trip by 14 qualifying students to compete in the PBL National Leadership Conference in Nashville, Tenn., next month.

A variety of items will be available at the sale, including clothing, electronics, books and furniture.

To donate, contact Donna Hendricks at dhendricks@southark.edu or (870) 864-7177.

South Arkansas Community College has announced its dean’s list for the spring semester:

From Banks, Carol Hawkins.
From Calion, Crystal Carrillo.
From Camden, Amy Cox, Jessica Martin, Denise Rayford, Corey Sharp, Christa Smith and Devin Tate,
From Chidester, Jennifer Toland.
From Crossett, Douglas Baker, Brandon Jones, Clara Watt and Gayla Williams.
From El Dorado, Alison Alderson, Katherine Allen, Keylee Anderson, Amanda Andrews, Joseph Barker, Joshua Barker, James Barksdale, Donna Barnes, Jessee Bearden, Ronald Bibby, Allie Blackwood, Sharon Blann, Micha Boone, Megan Bridges, Sherry Briggs, Tyler Brown, Megan Calaway, Jeffrey Cameron, Tiffany Carter, Ambrosia Caruso, Tiara Caver, Karrah Clark, Lynsey Clemens, Jessica Courtney, Ticia Cox, Shemika Dade, Merari Davis, Courtney Denoon, Matthew Diffie, Lukas Dinstbier, Hanna Donahue, Darryl Driskill, Barbara Ellison, Alexandria Fincher, Devan Foot, Jocelyn Ford, Sheena Ford, Candace Frisby, Kayla Gadberry, Cynthia Garner, Gina Garrett, Maryjo Gatewood, Wylie George, Michelle Gilbert, Nadene Goin, Tanya Golden, Rachel Grossman, Stephanie Hammond, Amy Hampton, Brianna Hargett, Josephine Harris, Zachery Helton, Jerrod Henry, Rosalba Hernandez, Labreshianna Hicks, Shannon Hill, Matt Hodges, Sharen Jahns, Shaquanna Johnson, Tiffany Johnson, Charles Jones, Jennifer Kelley, Tamekia Kesee, Nicolas Kinard, Jennifer Lane, Christopher Leach, Susan Lemon, Cathy Lewis, Savannah Lewis, Jonathon Loftin, Nicole Lovett, Stephanie Lowrey, Bethany Machen, Debra Malone, Justin McAlphin, Kris McCloy, Karen McCullar, Lori McKnight, Rosalee Meeks, Casey Miller, Celes Miller, Rachel Miller, Shawana Miller, Lillie Mitchell, Sharhonda Moody, Tyana Moody, Melissa Moore, Holly Morgan, Kathrine Morgan, Noah Moses, Derik Nash, Christina Navarrete, Amy New, Traci Owen, Caleb Palculict, Christopher Palculict, Jessica Patterson, Samantha Pendleton, Angela Perry, Sandra Prewett, Serena Rainwater, Carmea Ramey, Edna Ramirez, Demetria Raybon, Molly Rice, Tanya Rice, Jonathan Richard, Andrea Richardson, Tina Rivas, Angela Roberson, Ashley Rodriguez, Brittney Rogers, Madison Romine, Stephen Roose, Kernisha Rozier, Britteny Ruff, Alana Scott, Daphne Scott, Jeanne Shew, Timmie Singleton, Angela Smith, Bobbie Smith, Jared Smith, Latonya Smith, Lavoisier Smith, Rodney Smith, Jennifer Spencer, Claire Stringfellow, John Sullivan, John Temple, John Terry, Cassandra Vaughn, Desiree Williams, Kelsey Womack, Julie Wong, Marian Wood and Karen Worth.
From Emerson, Farran Hanson, Jamie Phillips, James Uloth and Whitney Ware.
From Fordyce, Wendy Adams and David Ramsay.
From Hamburg, Mary Wells.
From Hampton, Lacey Thomason.
From Hermitage, Brandi Ashcraft, Heather Hollingsworth, Kelley Hollingsworth,
Hope Lindsey Rose, Whitney Santifer and Kayla Whatley.
From Huttig, Kenya Baker, Courtney Moon and James Pill.
From Junction City, Aime Allgood, Chardia Carroll, Jessica Davis, Mary Nelson, Michael Penix, Chrystal Thurman and Kasie Tolbert.
From Lawson, Maryann Goff and Melissa McMurrian.
From Louann, Jacob McCorvey.
From Magnolia, Derecko Burton, Brandi Clark, Bobby Ford, Lajuana Hamilton, Latunya Jefferson, Steven Jetton, Tecoya Johnson, Makysha Livingston, Brandi Niedjela, Clair Roden and Anna Rogers.
From Monticello, Reginald Binns, Tanya Binns, Brittany Boone, Cristen Chrismond, Dantanese Lamb and Kevin Smith.
From Mount Holly, Carrie Havard and Stephen Havard.
From Murfreesboro, Jonothan Wheeler.
From Norphlet, Marla Benson and Kimberly Wright.
From Okolona, Ricky Clark.
From Prescott, Jazmine Franklin.
From Rison, Carrie Hollis and Leanna McClain.
From Smackover, Kathryn Burson, Britt Galbraith, Faith Hays, Krystal Herring, John Jameson, Lindsey Lawrence, Tequila Lee, Tameka Moore, Jerrick Richardson and Porsha Teasley.
From Stamps, Lindsey Rogers.
From Stephens, Marilyn Hayes, Sharita Jenkins, Cowanza Jones and Danika Torrence.
From Strong, Barbara Brodnax, Anastacia Dismuke, Holly Grice, Miki Manning and Jessica Massey.
From Taylor, Lauren Jennings.
From Waldo, Casey McClure.
From Warren, Courtney Bradley, Phillip Brown, April Cantrell, Carrie Cook, Rhonda Gorman, Dexter Lawrence, Felecia Payne, Barbara Ragland, Ashley Reep, Ronnie Rice, Tiffany Wargo, Alise Washington and Jamie Wolfe.
From Downsville, La., William Cook and Whitney Main.
From Dubach, La., Heather Smith.
From Farmerville, La., Casey Fletcher.
From Lillie, La., Jared Wilson.
From Marion, La., Amanda Brocato, Brittney Bryant, Shayla Fields and Steven Thurston.
From Monroe, La., Markus Lenard and Tanisha Marshall.
From Shongaloo, La., Annysia Martin.
From Spearsville, La., Randall Banks, Sarah Silmon, James Smith and Jessica Weaver.
From West Monroe, La., Karen Reynolds, Aimee Swanner and Dawn Walker.

Beyond the Mission, presented by Hope Landing president Jennifer Wylie, will be the Noon Symposium on Wednesday (May 19) in Room 121 of the South Arkansas Community College Center for Workforce Development at 3698 E. Main.

El Dorado-based Hope Landing, founded in 2005, is a non-profit corporation that seeks to help children with disabilities and their families.
Noon Symposia are hosted by the SouthArk Office of Corporate and Community Education. They are free and open to the public; those who attend are encouraged to bring their own lunches. Drinks and dessert are furnished by SouthArk. For more information, call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu.

EL DORADO, Ark.—Students at South Arkansas Community College will benefit from collaborative efforts between the school and several area universities put into motion on Tuesday, according to SouthArk officials.
Transfer agreements were signed with Southern Arkansas University in Magnolia, Henderson State University in Arkadelphia, the University of Arkansas-Monticello and the University of Louisiana-Monroe.
With these agreements, SouthArk students will have guarantees that their academic coursework will be accepted if they transfer to any of the partnering four-year institutions. Additionally, SouthArk students who transfer will receive joint academic advising, transition assistance and consultation about transfer scholarship opportunities.
Other benefits of these agreements, officials said, include increased retention and graduation rates.
“We are very excited about our partnerships with the universities and about the opportunities this is offering to SouthArk students,” SouthArk director of college transition Christy Wilson said. “SouthArk is ensuring a seamless transfer for students from an associate’s degree to a four-year program.  
SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones said that this collaboration is just one way in which the local college is partnering with other area institutions. SouthArk is cooperating with SAU, UAM and SAU-Tech in East Camden on a new summer advertising campaign, “Complete the Journey,” which prompts potential non-traditional students to return to college to finish their degrees.
“It is widely known that a college education leads to increased economic prosperity, expanded workforce opportunities, engaged citizens and improved quality of life,” Jones read from a proclamation. “We believe that increasing the percent of Arkansans with an associate or bachelor’s degree will help to bring about economic transformation in our state.”
southark-agreement
PHOTO
University of Louisiana-Monroe associate provost Eric Pani, far right, discusses the importance of the transfer agreements between South Arkansas Community College and other area universities signed on Tuesday. Also with Pani are, from left, Arkansas-Monticello chancellor Dr. Jack Lassiter, Henderson State provost Dr. Vernon G. Miles, SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones and Southern Arkansas University president Dr. David Rankin.

EL DORADO—Increasingly, gender plays less of a role in defining occupations. The shift usually is associated with women who enter male-dominated fields, but the opposite also is happening, as South Arkansas Community College student Saul Garay can attest.

When Garay, a 2009 graduate of Hermitage High School and a first-year SouthArk student, chose to enter the college’s cosmetology program, he said, he focused on the opportunity to be creative and help people feel good. The fact that cosmetology has traditionally been dominated by women was not a deterrent.
Garay said that he’s always liked working with his hands, whether doing manual labor such as carpentry, or enjoying a hobby like drawing. Garay said he uses the tools he has to give the client what they desire.
“Cosmetology,” he said, “seems to be the right place for my hands to be used.”   
Garay said that at first he felt a bit awkward working in a room full of women. Coming from a farming family, he said, he also faced some opposition from people who felt that he is going to be doing a woman’s job.
His next challenge, he said, was developing his capabilities and skill. According to SouthArk cosmetology instructor Shannon Rogers, Garay is a motivated and focused student who wants to succeed.
“He’s my prized possession,” Rogers said. “He’s always ready to learn, and he practiced to perfection.”
Garay said that a man can do what a woman can do and that many women prefer a male hairdresser, making cosmetology a good field for a man to be in.
“There will always be challenges and I may stumble,” he said, “but I never give up and always keep going forward.”
Once he graduates from SouthArk, Garay said, he plans to open his own shop or to volunteer abroad, providing his services free of charge to those who cannot afford it in order to help them feel good about themselves.
“When you see the final result and see the person is happy, you feel a satisfaction no one else can give you, that you can only give yourself,” Garay said. “And seeing the person happy and satisfied makes me feel proud of what I am doing.”
Since its inception two years ago, SouthArk’s cosmetology program has seen several males come through the program. According to Rogers, the program had four males participating in the program last year and three this year, including Garay.
Rogers said that some of the best hairdressers in the world are men.
“It’s a business. It’s an industry,” she said. “You make people look good, and when you look good, you feel good.”
SouthArk offers a two-year degree track in cosmetology in which a student can receive a cosmetology license and an associate’s degree with a minor in entrepreneurship. Students also can receive graduate certificates in cosmetology in a year or less.
According to Rogers, the SouthArk program is in great demand. With a maximum limit of 50 students, the program currently has a waiting list. Rogers said that having cosmetology at SouthArk is a great advantage to the community because many students cannot afford to go to the private schools in the area.
Rogers encouraged anyone—female or male—who is considering pursuing training or education in cosmetology to come in and visit with her and to look at the facilities. She can be reached at (870) 864-4926 extension 336, or at srogers@southark.edu.
For other inquiries, contact Larry Andrews at (870) 864-7108 or landrews@southark.edu.

southark-garay

PHOTO - SouthArk cosmetology student Saul Garay, right, cuts the hair of fellow student Gladys Rivas.

 

recipients

PHOTOS: Ricardi, Hughes, Shew, Goin.

Several area students have accepted scholarships to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.

Zoe Ricardi, a senior at Strong-Huttig High School, has accepted the Freshman Recognition Scholarship. She is the daughter of Michael and Alexandra Ricardi of Strong and is a member of the Book Club and French Club, and is the co-captain of the quiz-bowl team.

Priscilla Hughes, a 2010 graduate of Junction City High School, has accepted the President’s Scholarship. She is the daughter of Claudia Sharon Hux of Junction City. She was a member of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America; Future Business Leaders of America; the Student Council; the Character Council; the quiz-bowl team; and the dance team at JCHS.  Hughes also was named to Who’s Who Among American High-School Students and the National Honor Roll, and was Miss FBLA at JCHS.

Becky Shew of El Dorado has accepted the Pro Med Ambulance Scholarship.

Nadene Goin, a 2001 graduate of El Dorado High School, has accepted the Melba Tatom Nursing Endowed Scholarship.
 

South Arkansas Community College has announced its dean’s list for the spring semester:

From Banks, Carol Hawkins.
From Calion, Crystal Carrillo.
From Camden, Amy Cox, Jessica Martin, Denise Rayford, Corey Sharp, Christa Smith and Devin Tate,
From Chidester, Jennifer Toland.
From Crossett, Douglas Baker, Brandon Jones, Clara Watt and Gayla Williams.
From El Dorado, Alison Alderson, Katherine Allen, Keylee Anderson, Amanda Andrews, Joseph Barker, Joshua Barker, James Barksdale, Donna Barnes, Jessee Bearden, Ronald Bibby, Allie Blackwood, Sharon Blann, Micha Boone, Megan Bridges, Sherry Briggs, Tyler Brown, Megan Calaway, Jeffrey Cameron, Tiffany Carter, Ambrosia Caruso, Tiara Caver, Karrah Clark, Lynsey Clemens, Jessica Courtney, Ticia Cox, Shemika Dade, Merari Davis, Courtney Denoon, Matthew Diffie, Lukas Dinstbier, Hanna Donahue, Darryl Driskill, Barbara Ellison, Alexandria Fincher, Devan Foot, Jocelyn Ford, Sheena Ford, Candace Frisby, Kayla Gadberry, Cynthia Garner, Gina Garrett, Maryjo Gatewood, Wylie George, Michelle Gilbert, Nadene Goin, Tanya Golden, Rachel Grossman, Stephanie Hammond, Amy Hampton, Brianna Hargett, Josephine Harris, Zachery Helton, Jerrod Henry, Rosalba Hernandez, Labreshianna Hicks, Shannon Hill, Matt Hodges, Sharen Jahns, Shaquanna Johnson, Tiffany Johnson, Charles Jones, Jennifer Kelley, Tamekia Kesee, Nicolas Kinard, Jennifer Lane, Christopher Leach, Susan Lemon, Cathy Lewis, Savannah Lewis, Jonathon Loftin, Nicole Lovett, Stephanie Lowrey, Bethany Machen, Debra Malone, Justin McAlphin, Kris McCloy, Karen McCullar, Lori McKnight, Rosalee Meeks, Casey Miller, Celes Miller, Rachel Miller, Shawana Miller, Lillie Mitchell, Sharhonda Moody, Tyana Moody, Melissa Moore, Holly Morgan, Kathrine Morgan, Noah Moses, Derik Nash, Christina Navarrete, Amy New, Traci Owen, Caleb Palculict, Christopher Palculict, Jessica Patterson, Samantha Pendleton, Angela Perry, Sandra Prewett, Serena Rainwater, Carmea Ramey, Edna Ramirez, Demetria Raybon, Molly Rice, Tanya Rice, Jonathan Richard, Andrea Richardson, Tina Rivas, Angela Roberson, Ashley Rodriguez, Brittney Rogers, Madison Romine, Stephen Roose, Kernisha Rozier, Britteny Ruff, Alana Scott, Daphne Scott, Jeanne Shew, Timmie Singleton, Angela Smith, Bobbie Smith, Jared Smith, Latonya Smith, Lavoisier Smith, Rodney Smith, Jennifer Spencer, Claire Stringfellow, John Sullivan, John Temple, John Terry, Cassandra Vaughn, Desiree Williams, Kelsey Womack, Julie Wong, Marian Wood and Karen Worth.
From Emerson, Farran Hanson, Jamie Phillips, James Uloth and Whitney Ware.
From Fordyce, Wendy Adams and David Ramsay.
From Hamburg, Mary Wells.
From Hampton, Lacey Thomason.
From Hermitage, Brandi Ashcraft, Heather Hollingsworth, Kelley Hollingsworth,
Hope Lindsey Rose, Whitney Santifer and Kayla Whatley.
From Huttig, Kenya Baker, Courtney Moon and James Pill.
From Junction City, Aime Allgood, Chardia Carroll, Jessica Davis, Mary Nelson, Michael Penix, Chrystal Thurman and Kasie Tolbert.
From Lawson, Maryann Goff and Melissa McMurrian.
From Louann, Jacob McCorvey.
From Magnolia, Derecko Burton, Brandi Clark, Bobby Ford, Lajuana Hamilton, Latunya Jefferson, Steven Jetton, Tecoya Johnson, Makysha Livingston, Brandi Niedjela, Clair Roden and Anna Rogers.
From Monticello, Reginald Binns, Tanya Binns, Brittany Boone, Cristen Chrismond, Dantanese Lamb and Kevin Smith.
From Mount Holly, Carrie Havard and Stephen Havard.
From Murfreesboro, Jonothan Wheeler.
From Norphlet, Marla Benson and Kimberly Wright.
From Okolona, Ricky Clark.
From Prescott, Jazmine Franklin.
From Rison, Carrie Hollis and Leanna McClain.
From Smackover, Kathryn Burson, Britt Galbraith, Faith Hays, Krystal Herring, John Jameson, Lindsey Lawrence, Tequila Lee, Tameka Moore, Jerrick Richardson and Porsha Teasley.
From Stamps, Lindsey Rogers.
From Stephens, Marilyn Hayes, Sharita Jenkins, Cowanza Jones and Danika Torrence.
From Strong, Barbara Brodnax, Anastacia Dismuke, Holly Grice, Miki Manning and Jessica Massey.
From Taylor, Lauren Jennings.
From Waldo, Casey McClure.
From Warren, Courtney Bradley, Phillip Brown, April Cantrell, Carrie Cook, Rhonda Gorman, Dexter Lawrence, Felecia Payne, Barbara Ragland, Ashley Reep, Ronnie Rice, Tiffany Wargo, Alise Washington and Jamie Wolfe.
From Downsville, La., William Cook and Whitney Main.
From Dubach, La., Heather Smith.
From Farmerville, La., Casey Fletcher.
From Lillie, La., Jared Wilson.
From Marion, La., Amanda Brocato, Brittney Bryant, Shayla Fields and Steven Thurston.
From Monroe, La., Markus Lenard and Tanisha Marshall.
From Shongaloo, La., Annysia Martin.
From Spearsville, La., Randall Banks, Sarah Silmon, James Smith and Jessica Weaver.
From West Monroe, La., Karen Reynolds, Aimee Swanner and Dawn Walker.

An introductory watercolor painting class, Intro to Watercolor, will be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursdays on May 27-July 1 at the Center for Workforce Development at South Arkansas Community College. Johnny Whatley will be the instructor of the class, offered by the SouthArk Office of Corporate and Community Education.

No experience is necessary to enter the beginners’ class. The class will cover staining, non-staining, transparent and opaque colors, as well as appropriate brushes, paper and palettes.

The fee is $49. For more information, call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu.

EL DORADO, Ark.—With 552 graduates, the South Arkansas Community College Class of 2010 has eclipsed its previous high in class size set last year.

Here is the list of graduates by town:
El Dorado
Associate’s degrees: Stephen Barker, William D. Bullock, King David Montgomery and Madison E. Romine, general technology; Donna M. Barnes (cum laude), Lynsey Morgan Clemens, Hanna Marissa Donahue, Caitlin Hamilton-Watkins, Kris McCloy and Marian Candice Wood (summa cum laude), physical therapist assistance; Glendora Beasley (cum laude), Tyler Scott Brown, Blake H. Bullard, Courtney S. Caver, Sophilia Q. Davidson, Merari P. Davis, Karen S. Duke (summa cum laude), Lucas J. Forbes, Virginia R. Ford, Jared Garrett, Kiara N. Gill, Kristen E. Hansen, Pamela M. Hilliard, Sherry N. Justus (summa cum laude), Rosalee Isabelle Meeks (cum laude), Serena Rainwater, Rhonda D. Ramey, Monica A. Roberts, Ashley D. Roberts, Michael Wayne Roberts (cum laude), Joseph Brandon Shryock, Bobbie Smith (magna cum laude), Jared Alan Smith, Jordan Elizabeth Tanner, Pina Tanui (cum laude), Christopher M. Vaughan (magna cum laude), Desiree Williams and Jeffrey B. Willis (summa cum laude), arts; Carmon E. Brittain, Felicia A. Drisdle, Amie M. Felton (magna cum laude), Kelly L. Hardenbrook (magna cum laude), Suranee Campbell Horst, Michelle A. Jackson, Kasey L. McClain (magna cum laude), James A. McDaniel (magna cum laude), Jennifer D. McTigrit and Chad L. Shields (cum laude), registered nursing; Tiara M. Caver, Tamekia L. Kesee, Lesia M. Marshall (magna cum laude), James W. Morrow (cum laude), Benita J. Schafer and Tantarras T. Smith, criminal justice administration; Martha L. Dunn, computer information technology; Amy Elizabeth Garner, Shannon Hill, Troy Misenheimer, Jeff Purtle, Stephen Roose and Angela Stratton, teaching, Jasmine ShaNay Green-Harris and Latonya Smith, network security technology; LaBreshianna Hicks and Demetria L. Raybon, radiologic technology; Marcee E. Holly, Kimberly N. House, Cathy Janell Lewis, Michelle Miller and Sheila D. Taylor, administrative assistant technology; Sharen C. Jahns, surgical technology; Jennifer Ann Kelley, Karen A. Ross and Jennifer A. Spencer, occupational therapy assistance; Varonica Kennedy, Lisa Lewis (magna cum laude), Tanya Lanette Rice, Tanui (cum laude), teaching-preschool through fourth grade; Shelcy McGriff (magna cum laude), Brenda Roy and Lakreshia D. Steward, early-childhood education; Brittany Thurlkill, general business administration.
Technical certificates: Crystal Gayle Allen and Wylie George, medical coding; Allen, medical transcription; Jesse M. Amason (high honors), Keylee M. Anderson, Jeanie C. Baker, Erica S. Bland, Amanda L. Graves Boyett, Suzanne L. Brumley, Richard B. Dente (honors), Clayton R. Gadberry (honors), Amanda K. Gaither, Mary Jo Gatewood, Ashley N. Dosch Graves, Whitney B. Foster Hargraves, Rosalba G. Hernandez, Tanya L. Jackson, ShaQuanna N. Johnson, Arnetia Johnson Singleton, Justus (highest honors), Juston. D. Larry, Meagan H. Loftin, Victoria M. Lumsey (high honors), Lynley R. Marshall, Matthew N. Miller, DeQuita L. Miller, Lauren E. Nelson, Chris Palculict, Kelley Porter (honors), Shellie E. Reynolds, Jonathan Richard, Lakeny Roach, Angela Roberson, Brittney Rogers, Alecia R. Harrison Rushing, Daphne Scott, Jonathan B. Smith, Tab L. Spry, Jessica E. Tarver, Derrick Waldrup, Letischa M. Walker (honors) and Karen M. Worth, practical nursing; Tennie T. Bailey, Monica S. Bailey, Beasley (honors), Chris Collins, Angela Curley, Crystal Nichole Deason, Courtney DeNoon, Hernandez, Hilliard (honors), Charles L. Jones Jr., Kennedy, Lumsey (high honors), Jennifer Matlock, Misenheimer, Marsha Moore, Tabitha D. Moore (honors), Angela M. Moore, Lillie Mosley, Simeon L. Norman, Purtle, Rainwater, Tanya L. Rice (honors), Roose (honors), Alicia A. Simpson (high honors), Janie C. Smith, Kalyn Swint (high honors), Tanui, Jennifer Tucker and Julie J. Wong, general studies; Barker, Toronto M. Hicks and Orlando Stewart, industrial equipment maintenance; Sherry Briggs, Kathy D. Modica (highest honors), Tennille Murphy Davis and Beverly J. Pumphrey, administrative assistant technology; Jeffrey O. Cameron, Lukas Dinstbier, Britt J. Galbraith, Zachary W. Helton and Derik A. Nash, emergency medical technology-paramedic; Jessica L. Courtney, general business administration; Holly, Lewis and Melissa A. Moore, accounting; Erik Atkinson, Nicolas Kinard (honors), James Lewis (honors) and Eric Millican, welding technology; LaTona Lovett, Dorneshia Miller, Colonda Pierce, Rainwater (honors), Roy, Angela Smith and Tanui early-childhood education; Marco A. Luebanos, computer-network installation and repair technology; James Eric Rapp, automotive service technology.
Certificates of proficiency: Amanda Andrews, Kristi Gardner, Kesee, Crystal Murry, Joshua Newton, Edna Ramirez and Steven Smith, criminal justice administration; Andrews, Tiara Caver, Kesee, Lesia Marshall, Rosie Rogan, Tantarras Smith and Steven Smith and Daniel Tom, law-enforcement administration; Atkinson, Justin Rankin, Kyle T. Rapp, Fredarrian Robinson, Sawyer Damon Sinclair, Eric Wade Smith, Nathan Sparks and Cornelius Watson, welding technology-gas metal arc welding; Atkinson, Guy M. Ball, Joshua Hudson, James A. Lewis, Boris Miles, Millican and Sparks, welding technology-gas tungsten arc welding; Fabian Ayala, Justin Calloway, Kirby Cox, Windell Davis, Landon B. McMahen, Miles, Sean Mullison, Kimberly Simmons, Shawn W. Utley and Colby Vines, automotive maintenance technology; Barker, Jerry Childs Jr., Toronto M. Hicks, Stewart and Bruce A. Turner, industrial electricity technology-basic; LaTisha Michelle Briggs, ShaQuetta Edwards, Sara E. Mayes, Shenequa Alexandria Moody, Kenya Moore and Shanay Perkins, basic cosmetology-hair care; Jacob Camell, Zac Camell, Tommy Gerrald, Curtis Goodwin, Daniel Heard, Stacy Henry, Marion Zach Lowery, Christopher J. Martindale, Nolan Mock, Kelly B. Peralta, Robinson, Brian A. Smith, Clint Taylor, Justin Tucker and Joel S. Wilson, welding technology-shielded metal arc welding; Jordan Camp, Miles, Dustin Owens, Matt Roberts and Marcus Washington, automotive diagnostics technology; Gene D. Chaffin, Yolanda Gusby, Angela R. Harper, Carla R. Hill, Kayla Jackson, Shunia Kelley, Shakela Danyale Mitchell, Amy A. Murphy, Cordnee L. Nathan and Elena B. Riley, certified nursing assistance; Maribel DeArnold, Kim K. Dismuke, Stacee L. Frazier, Deatrid Glover, Lovett, Brooke McGhee, Alicia Neely, Brandy Purifoy, Rainwater, Angie Rettig, Angela Smith and Karen L. Taylor, early-childhood education; Edwards, Evonne Nicole Gray and Mayes, intermediate cosmetology-nail and skin care; Nate O. Ellen, Patrick L. Fitzgerald, Larry J. Fogle, Michael P. Fontenot, Jason D. Hogue, Daryl R. Nelson, Stormey C. Primm, Hannah R. Senn, Jacob S. Swilley, Mathew C. Talley, Joshua C. Temple and Tequila M. White, emergency medical technology-ambulance; Eleece A. Frazier, administrative assistant technology; Simon Gatewood, Luebanos, Quantia Miller and Maria Pierce and Stacia Willis, network installation and repair technology; Clinton Jas Rodgers and Sparks, welding layout and pipefitting; and Anthony D. Thomas, truck driving.
Banks
Technical certificates: Elizabeth J. Barnes, practical nursing (highest honors).
Certificates of proficiency: Charlotte M. Loomis, emergency medical technology-ambulance.
Calion
Associate’s degrees: Stephanie Ingle, criminal justice administration.
Technical certificates: Lu-Ann Benson, practical nursing.
Certificates of proficiency: Ingle, law-enforcement administration.
Camden
Associate’s degrees: Amy Marie Cox, physical therapist assistance; Elizabeth June Dismuke, arts; Wayne Looney, registered nursing; Jessica S. Martin and Denise Rayford, radiologic technology; Joy Yarbrough, occupational therapy assistance.
Technical certificates: Bradley Floyd, computer information technology; Patricia A. Powell and Scott Vaughan (high honors), practical nursing; Shundrea Walker, administrative assistant technology; Walker, general business.
Certificates of proficiency: Floyd, shielded metal arc welding.
Crossett
Associate’s degrees: Rebecca Lynn Walthall, occupational therapy assistance; Clara Jenece Watt, radiologic technology.
Technical certificates: Douglas Baker and Brandon Jones, emergency medical technology-paramedic; Stephanie L. Chambless, Shannon H. Kinney, Aimee L. Vance Rice (high honors) and Cynthia A. Williams (high honors), practical nursing.
Certificates of proficiency: Ellen M. Miller, emergency medical technology-ambulance; Melanie Stell, certified nursing assistance.
DeWitt
Associate’s degrees: Doyle W. Manis, general technology.
Emerson
Associate’s degrees: Farran L. Hanson, physical therapist assistance; Ashley Shackelford, teaching-preschool through fourth grade.
Technical certificates: Shackelford, general studies.
Certificates of proficiency: Delwyn D. Easter, emergency medical technology-ambulance; Jordan Hansen, law-enforcement administration.
Fordyce
Technical certificates: Wendy C. Adams, medical coding.
Hampton
Associate’s degrees: Lacey D. Thomason (summa cum laude), physical therapist assistance.
Certificate of proficiency, Joseph E. Jones, emergency medical technology-ambulance.
Harrell
Associate’s degrees: Krysta Breazeale, teaching.
Technical certificates, Chukakun T. Williams Nix, general studies.
Hermitage
Associate’s degrees: Mary Carroll, teaching-preschool through fourth grade.
Technical certificates: Hollie A. Wardlaw and Kaci L. Wilkerson (high honors), practical nursing.
Hope
Associate’s degrees: Whitney Santifer, occupational therapy assistance.
Huttig
Associate’s degrees: Kenya Baker, general technology; Faye E. Govan, administrative assistant technology; Neysa J. Watkins (magna cum laude) and Baker, arts.
Technical certificates: Baker and D'Ante Allen Barr, general studies; Govan, administrative assistant technology.
Certificates of proficiency: Baker, industrial controls technology; Baker, industrial electricity technology-basic; Ramiro N. Correa and Nicholas C. Matthews, automotive maintenance technology; Shannon D. Rogers, cosmetology-hair care; Rogers, cosmetology-nail and skin care; Steven Vestal, law enforcement.
Jersey
Technical certificates: Patricia A. Temple (high honors), general studies.
Junction City
Associate’s degrees: Brenda Billings, teaching-preschool through fourth grade; William K. Manning and John Thomas Pope, arts.
Technical certificate: Aime Allgood, Amy E. Baggett, Nicole Blackmon, Melanie S. Davis, Jessica Davis and Brandy S. Mendoza, general studies; Caleb Palculict, practical nursing; Michael S. Penix, emergency medical technology-paramedic.
Certificates of proficiency: Kevin A. Bodine, automotive diagnostics technology; Tracy C. Carrington and Chrystal Thurman, certified nursing assistance; Buddy Lewis and Matthew Tanton, automotive maintenance technology; Samantha McLemore, basic cosmetology-hair care.
Kingsland
Associate’s degrees: Kayla Coston, arts.
Lawson
Associate’s degrees: MaryAnn Goff, criminal justice administration.
Technical certificates: Melissa McMurrian, surgical technology.
Certificates of proficiency: Goff, law-enforcement administration.
Louann
Certificates of proficiency: Sabrina Hinson, basic cosmetology-hair care.
Magnolia
Associate’s degrees: Jordan Butler and Brandi Michelle Clark, occupational therapy assistance; Bobby DeVonne Ford and Brandi Nicole Niedjela, radiologic technology; Ashlee Hayes, teaching-preschool through fourth grade; LaTunya Jefferson (cum laude) and TeCoya Johnson, early-childhood education; Joseph W. Martinez III (cum laude), arts; Brett A. Powell (cum laude), registered nursing.
Technical certificates: Crystal J. Adkins, Janita A. Hartwell, Vonnerdette M. Mclendon Morris (honors) and Martell L. Robinson, practical nursing; Justina Curry Watson, Jefferson (honors) and Johnson, early-childhood education; Lorian D. McGraw and Shaneka Merrell Rhone-Crockett, medical coding; Stephanie Risley, general studies.
Certificates of proficiency: Elyse N. Armstrong, certified nursing assistance; Cortney Burdine, basic cosmetology-hair care; Burdine, intermediate cosmetology-nail and skin care; Derecko Burton, industrial electricity technology-basic; Burton and Jayvian Johnson, welding technology-shielded metal-arc welding; TeCoya Johnson, early-childhood education.
Malvern
Associate’s degrees: Caleb J. Bettis (magna cum laude), emergency medical technology-paramedic.
McNeil
Associate’s degrees: Monty J. Glasscock (summa cum laude), registered nursing; Stephanie Risley, teaching-preschool through fourth grade.
Monticello
Associate’s degrees: Dantanese La Shann Lamb (cum laude), physical therapist assistance.
Technical certificates: Reginald Dewayne Binns, emergency medical technician-paramedic.
Mount Holly
Associate’s degrees: Stephen William Havard and Carrie Havard, physical therapist assistance.
Certificates of proficiency: Otis V. Davis and Morgan L. Thomas, welding technology-gas metal arc welding; Davis, welding technology-gas tungsten arc welding; Michael D. Phillips, industrial controls technology; Phillips, solid state-analog technology; Brittany Williams, certified nursing assistance; Jessica L. Lewis, basic cosmetology-hair care; Lewis, intermediate cosmetology-nail and skin care.
Murfreesboro
Technical certificates: Jonothan R. Wheeler, emergency medical technology-paramedic.
New Edinburg
Certificates of proficiency: Donald Trantham, welding technology-shielded metal arc welding.
Norphlet
Associate’s degrees: Marla Benson (magna cum laude), arts; Amy Elizabeth Lambert, occupational therapy assistance; Vickie L. Palmer McDonald (magna cum laude), registered nursing.
Technical certificates: Brittany Nichole Tucker, general studies.
Certificates of proficiency: Anthony D. Harris, emergency medical technician-ambulance.
Okolona
Technical certificate: Ricky W. Clark, emergency medical technician-paramedic.
Rison
Associate’s degrees: Carrie Jane Hollis, physical therapist assistance.
Technical certificates: Amanda R. Bates (honors), practical nursing.
Smackover
Associate’s degrees: Kathryn Nicole Burson, radiologic technology; Faith P. Hays, physical therapist assistance; John Jameson and Kim Winchester, teaching.
Technical certificates: Karen E. Butler and James R. Jameson (high honors), practical nursing; John Jameson, Rita J. Monk Givens (honors) and Porsha D. Teasley, general studies; Lawrence Ross, industrial equipment maintenance.
Certificates of proficiency: Steve A. Blair, welding technology-gas metal arc welding; Josh Brown, automotive maintenance technology; Michelle Burson, Samantha Davis and Janice Ford, early-childhood education; Paul Hackenberger, emergency medical technology-ambulance; Casey Howe, welding technology-gas tungsten arc welding; Samantha Kemp, basic cosmetology-hair care; Donte McHenry, automotive diagnostics technology; Devonte Roberson, network installation and repair technology; Lawrence Ross, industrial electricity technology-basic.
Star City
Technical certificates: Bridgette A. O'Fallon (high honors), practical nursing.
Stephens
Technical certificates: Sharita Turner-Jenkins, medical coding.
Certificates of proficiency: Chris Riley, welding technology-gas tungsten arc welding.
Strong
Associate’s degrees: Jakiero L. Dismuke, arts; Kristie Morgan and Cody C. Thomas, criminal justice administration; Carrie Neikirk (cum laude), teaching; Neikirk (cum laude), teaching-preschool through fourth grade; Meshelle M. Smith, occupational therapy assistance.
Technical certificates: Courtney D. Benjamin, Dismuke, Neikirk (honors) and Audrey Newton, general studies; Krystal A. Herring, emergency medical technician-paramedic; Samaria RaShone Lumsey, medical coding; Miki K. Manning (honors) and Jessica Massey, practical nursing.
Certificates of proficiency: Kyle Agerton and Morgan R. Jones, automotive diagnostics technology; Jeffrey Evans, Reginald Dominique Evans and Jeffrey Evans, network installation and repair technology; Hunter Keaster, automotive maintenance technology; Morgan and Thomas, law-enforcement administration; Justin R. Poole, welding technology-gas tungsten arc welding.
Waldo
Associate’s degrees: Kadie Lauren Clark, occupational therapy assistance; Casey Nicole McClure, radiologic technology.
Technical certificate: Kezia V. Gobert, practical nursing.
Warren
Associate’s degrees: Dexter Lawrence, network security technology; Ashley Lauren Reep, occupational therapy assistance; Theretha Marie White, radiologic technology.
Technical certificates: Kayla R. Hargrave, Carol Hawkins, Sonja L. Patton (honors), Megan L. Powell, Casey L. Hilpert Rady, Tiffany R. Rawls, Leslie A. Stephens (high honors) and Sha'Mikka Y. Tenner; Felecia Payne (highest honors), medical coding.
Certificates of proficiency: Teresa Davis, certified nursing assistance.
Bernice, La.
Associate’s degrees: Wendy Comfort, early-childhood education; Chad A. Evans (magna cum laude) and Stephanie M. McDonald Horton, registered nursing.
Technical certificates: Comfort, early-childhood education; Samantha D. Harris, practical nursing.
Columbia, La.
Technical certificates: Etoya Davis, emergency medical technology-paramedic.
Downsville, La.
Associate’s degrees: William Dennis Cook, radiologic technology; Whitney Nicole Main (cum laude), physical therapist assistant; Roatess Reeves, arts.
Farmerville, La.
Associate’s degrees: Casey Fletcher, radiologic technology; Heather D. Parson (summa cum laude), registered nursing.
Technical certificates: Brandi K. Burnham (high honors) and Shondra D. Fields, practical nursing.
Haynesville, La.
Technical certificates: Jessica Marie Coleman, medical transcription; Kristi L. Daniel (honors), practical nursing.
Marion, La.
Associate’s degrees: Jessica P. Bankston (summa cum laude), registered nursing;
Paige M. Bryant and Russell Lee Wise, physical therapist assistance; Ruth White, teaching.
Technical certificates: Amanda Brocato (high honors), early-childhood education; Amy R. LeBrun (high honors), practical nursing; White, general studies.
Certificates of proficiency: Brocato, early-childhood education.
Monroe, La.
Associate’s degrees: Beverly A. Mathis, registered nursing.
Technical certificates: Markus Lenard, emergency medical technician-paramedic.
Shongaloo, La.
Technical certificates: Michelle Martin, practical nursing.
Spearsville, La.
Associate’s degrees: Sierra Beaird (cum laude), criminal justice administration; Jessica Lynne Weaver, physical therapist assistance.
Technical certificates: Latasha Michelle Meriman, medical coding; Sarah Silmon, surgical technology; Susan R. Taylor, practical nursing.
Certificates of proficiency: Beaird, law-enforcement administration.
Sterlington, La.
Associate’s degrees: Amy L. Stewart (cum laude), registered nursing.
West Monroe, La.
Associate’s degrees: Karen Michelle Reynolds, physical therapist assistance.
Warrensburg, Mo.
Timothy M. Medlin (magna cum laude), arts.

larkin_foundation

Scott Larkin, right, an English instructor at South Arkansas Community College, is the 2010 recipient of the G. Thomas Baumgardner Students’ Choice Faculty Award. Baumgardner also is pictured. Student votes determine the award winner each year; he or she receives $500 for faculty development. In addition to teaching, Larkin edits the college’s literary magazine Between the Lines and sponsors SouthArk’s chapter of Phi Theta Kappa.

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South Arkansas Community College recently joined the Arkansas Works Initiative to offer career education and counseling to its students. Gov. Mike Beebe launched the initiative in late 2008 with the Governor’s Summit on Education and Economic Development.

The Arkansas Works Initiative includes a College and Career Planning System, which allows students and adults to identify and research their career interests and Arkansas businesses, as well as allowing employers to advertise their business and search for potential employees.

SouthArk TRIO: Student Support Services, Career Pathways and Retention programs utilize the College and Career Planning System to help students identify their skills, interests and values in order to plan their academic and career goals. Through the Web-based system Kuder Journey, students can take assessments, research college majors and careers, link to financial-aid opportunities, research and connect with Arkansas businesses, and build professional resumes and portfolios.

However, the system is not limited to institutions of higher education. High schools, workforce development centers and business are also utilizing the system to educate and counsel future employees and expand job growth in the state of Arkansas. More than 1,500 education, economic development community and business leaders from every county in Arkansas have joined Arkansas Works.
For more information on the Arkansas Works Initiative, visit www.arworks.arkansas.gov or call 1-866-ARWORKS.
 
PHOTO: South Arkansas Community College student services specialist Brooke Burger, center, walks SouthArk non-traditional student Mary Grissom through a Kuder Journey survey on Friday (May 5).

Two Secondary Technical Center students at South Arkansas Community College recently were inducted into the National Technical Honor Society.

Kristen Nelson, a junior at Smackover High School, and Sara Hisaw, a junior at Parkers Chapel High School, both are health-science technology majors.

SouthArk’s Secondary Technical Center trains secondary students from Union County’s six public school districts. They are selected based on their interests and grades, and counselor recommendations.

Selection by NTHS requires instructor nomination, good attendance and at least a 3.2 grade-point average.

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El Dorado High School Juniors, Erin Malone and Antuan George have been nominated by South Ark’s Upward Bound program to serve as Delegates to the Council for Opportunity in Education’s 21st Annual National Student Leadership Congress from June 5-10, 2010 at American University in Washington, D.C. Upward Bound is a federally funded program designed to provide first generation college bound students with opportunities designed to support successful college completion. Malone and George are currently speaking to community organizations about the Upward Bound program and are accepting donations to help defray the costs of travel to and participation in the National Student Leadership Congress.

Anyone wishing to have a presentation or make a donation may call the Upward Bound offices at South Arkansas Community College (870-864-8409).

Make Donation Payable to:
Upward Bound
P.O. Box 7010
El Dorado, Arkansas 71730

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El Dorado High School Junior Vanessa Kilgore has been accepted to the 2010 Pharmacy Summer Camp at the UAMS College of Pharmacy.  Vanessa completed her application through South Ark’s Upward Bound program, a federally funded program designed to provide first generation college bound students with opportunities designed to support successful college completion.  From left to right, Roy Williams, South Ark Upward Bound Coordinator, Vanessa Kilgore, Breanna Kilgore, and Vanessa’s mother, Aneita Kilgore.

garner_ginnyEL DORADO—South Arkansas Community College has named Warren native Ginny Garner the marketer and event planner for the El Dorado Multi-Purpose Conference Center.

Through an agreement between the college and the City of El Dorado, the center will be operated and managed by SouthArk.

Garner, of Casper, Wyo., has spent the last 10 years in various event planning, public relations and marketing roles in the health-care industry, most recently for the Wyoming Behavioral Institute in Casper. She also has extensive experience in hospitality sales and catering with companies like Intercontinental Hotels, Hilton Hotels and Disney.
She is a 2000 graduate of the University of Wyoming in Laramie, Wyo., with a bachelor’s degree in communications. She is a master’s-degree candidate in organizational leadership at Gonzaga University in Spokane, Wash.

“I am excited to move home and become part of the El Dorado community,” Garner said. “Furthermore, I am honored to be chosen to open this amazing and beautiful conference center, and look forward to keeping the center full while marketing El Dorado, Union County and south Arkansas across the state and region.”

Construction of the center is being funded through a 1-cent city sales tax for economic development and a multi-million-dollar gift from Murphy Oil.

“I would like to thank the voters of El Dorado for their confidence and forward thinking in passing the tax to build the conference center; I will work everyday to make them proud and to be a good steward,” Garner said.

SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones spoke highly of Garner.

“We look forward to Ginny Garner’s joining the SouthArk faculty and staff team,” Jones said. “She brings a broad range of education, experience and skills related to hospitality and marketing.”

South Arkansas Community College recently named its Outstanding Employees.

Joe Murray was named Outstanding Classified Staff Member. Murray is the foreman of the SouthArk grounds crew. Becky Riggs was named Outstanding Professional Staff Member. She is the human resources manager.

Business professor Dr. Carolyn Langston was selected as Outstanding Business and Technical Faculty Member. Radiologic technology clinical coordinator Mandi Haynes was named Outstanding Health and Natural Sciences Faculty Member. English associate professor Jessie Wrenn was named Outstanding Liberal Arts Faculty Member. Wrenn also was selected as the Overall Outstanding Faculty Member.

Riggs also was selected as the Outstanding Alumnus.

Four musical entertainers will take the stage at South Arkansas Community College on Friday for the Jam in the Gym, hosted by the Alpha Gamma Iota Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa.

The event begins at 7 p.m. in the SouthArk Gym on the West Campus.

Performing will be local acts Charley Hankins, Chris Loggins, Age of Man and the Unfit Mothers.

Admission is $5. Concessions will be available for purchase.

The South Arkansas Community College Foundation’s Evening With the Stars, which honors supporters and alumni of SouthArk, is set for 6:30 p.m on May 8 at the South Arkansas Arts Center.

Honored this year will be Friend of the College Phil Herring and Distinguished Alumni Larry Andrews and Cheryl  McKinnon.

Herring, a longtime Foundation Board member, has been a major supporter of the Foundation’s annual fundraiser the Outdoor Expo, which features the Phil Herring Rib Cook-Off. The Expo has raised more than $100,000 for scholarships and Foundation operations, according to Foundation President Clara Jones.

Herring is the owner of Herring Furniture Company in Strong and is the sales and service manager for AmeriGas Propane. He is the president of the Arkansas Home Furnishing Association. Herring also is on the boards of Simmons First Bank and Hudson Memorial Nursing Home. He is a member of the El Dorado Civitan Club and a former member of the boards of the United Way of Union County, the El Dorado Chamber of Commerce, Life Touch Hospice, the local Salvation Army and the Union County Industrial Board. He received the Spirit of El Dorado Award from the Chamber of Commerce in 2007.  

Andrews is SouthArk’s student retention coordinator. He graduated from SouthArk in 2003 and later graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Southern Arkansas University in Magnolia and a master’s degree from the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. Andrews then was employed by the El Dorado School District before accepting his position at SouthArk and becoming an adjunct professor at SAU.

Andrews has been a member of the Arkansas Division of Volunteerism Advisory Council, the Union County Water Conservation Board and the Union County Fair Board. He also has been a 4-H leader and a member of the Sunshine Riding Club, the El Dorado Municipal Auditorium Committee and the Wildwood Water Association.

McKinnon is a licensed practical nursing instructor at SouthArk. She graduated from the college as the Outstanding Student in the LPN Class of 2000. She graduated magna cum laude with an associate’s degree in nursing from SAU in 2002 and magna cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Arkansas Tech University in Russellville in 2009.

Before becoming an adjunct clinical instructor at SouthArk in 2006, she was a staff nurse at the Medical Center of South Arkansas. McKinnon still is a professional nurse
She has been a volunteer at the Victory Bible Youth Camp in Carthage for the past 16 summers and is a leader in her church’s community growth groups and children’s activities.

“We look forward to acknowledging the philanthropic work of Phil Herring and celebrating the achievements of our outstanding alumni Larry Andrews and Cheryl McKinnon,” SouthArk President Dr. Barbara Jones said.

Tickets for the event are $50 per person. To buy tickets, contact Cynthia Reyna at (870) 864-7130 or creyna@southark.edu.

LITTLE ROCK—Fourteen South Arkansas Community College students qualified for national competition in the 2010 Arkansas Phi Beta Lambda Spring Leadership Conference here earlier this month.

Additionally SouthArk’s Marla Benson was named the Arkansas PBL Member of the Year.

The Sigma Epsilon Chapter won a Gold sweepstakes award. Individual first-place finishers among the many entries from the chapter were Pam Hilliard (client service), Noah Moses (computer concepts), Bobby Freeman (networking concepts, cyber security), Jordan Hanson (justice administration), Jennie Harris (annual business report), LaSandra Malone (administrative services), Kevin McKinlay, (business math), Traci Owen (computerized accounting, medical transcription) and Benson (machine transcription). The team of Moses and Jasmine Harris took first in network design, and the team of Benson and Kayla Whatley was first in desktop publishing.

Individual second-place finishers were Owen (business math), Bobbie Smith (computer applications), Moses (computer operation systems), Benson (computerized accounting), Cathy Lewis (machine transcription), Lisa Sipes (medical transcription), Dexter Lawrence (networking concepts, telecommunications), Serena Cannon (scrabook), Barbara Hill (administrative services) and McKinlay (statistical analysis). The team of Whatley and Hannah Colvin took second in Web site development and the team of Jennie Harris and Sarah Smith was second in desktop publishing.

Individual third-place finishers were Ashley Brown (business math), Sipes (business English), Natalie Harris (computerized accounting), Kelly Jones (machine transcription), Sarah Smith (medical transcription), McKinlay (microeconomics), Jasmine Harris (network design, network concepts), Daniel Tom (project management, information management), Bobbie Smith (statistical anaylsis) and Tyler Brown (word processing). The team of Benson and Sarah Smith finished third in community service and the team of Colvin and Brittany Jerry Thurlkill took third in desktop publishing.

Individual fourth-place finishers were Justin McAlphin (administrative services), Turlkill (business English, project management), Sherry Briggs (computer concepts) and Jennie Harris (fact test). The team of Jay Henard and Lauren Jennings was fourth in emerging business issues.
Individual fifth-place finishers were Freeman (advertising), Jennie Harris (business communications) and Ashley Brown (statistical analysis).
Benson, Moses, Tyler Brown and Sarah Smith all also were recognized as Who’s Who in PBL.

The PBL 2010 National Leadership Conference is set for July 9-12 in Nashville, Tenn.

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March 18, 2010 - Dr. Kermit Parks, left, presents the Dr. Kermit M. Parks Public Service Endowed Scholarship to South Arkansas Community College criminal justice major Amanda Andrews of El Dorado recently. The new scholarship is bestowed to a SouthArk student who is planning a career in public service and is involved in political or community activities. An applicant also must submit an essay. Parks taught political science at SouthArk for 28 years.

HOT SPRINGS—Three South Arkansas Community College automotive service students placed in the recent SkillsUSA Arkansas State Championships here.

Jordan Camp was first in secondary auto service, Dakota Tucker was first in post-secondary auto service and Lawrence Dexter was first in post-secondary auto parts.

The three qualified to compete in the National Leadership and Skills Conference on June 20-25 in Kansas City, Mo. Their advisors are Karsten Tidwell and Doyle Manis.

Forty-seven Union County high school students have been selected for publication in the 13th annual volume of Writers’ Ink, a literary magazine published by South Arkansas Community College and edited by the SouthArk English faculty.

During the 2009-‘10 academic year, high school students were invited through their English teachers to submit original poems, essays and-or short stories as entries in a creative writing contest with the best submissions to be published in Writers’ Ink. Cash prizes were offered as an additional incentive to enter the contest—$100 for first place, $75 for second and $50 for third in three literary genres and two age divisions, ninth and 10th grades and 11th and 12th grades.  

The prizes in this year’s contest will be awarded and the magazines distributed at a ceremony on at 2 p.m. on April 25 in the SouthArk Library Auditorium on the college’s West Campus. The awards ceremony will be followed by a reception in the library gallery in honor of the student authors and their English teachers. The public is invited to attend.

In the junior division poetry contest, Haley Corley, a ninth-grade student of Aprile Richardson at Smackover High School, won first prize with “Seven.” Second prize went to Kaitlyn Cardin, a 10th-grade student of Carol Rankin at Parkers Chapel High School, for “Poetry Doubts.” Lexi Benedetti, a ninth-grade student of Stacy Kendrick at Parkers Chapel, won third prize with her poem “I Am...”
Winning honorable mention for junior division poetry were Ashley Wilson, Josh Harpole and Nicole Martin ninth-grade students at Smackover; Haley Brotherton, Molly Jones and Leah Spaun, 10th-grade students at Parkers Chapel; Wesley Houldridge, a ninth-grade student at Junction City; Darby Gathright, Ashley Haning and Allyson Meeks, ninth-grade students at Parkers Chapel; and Michael Welch, a 10th-grade student at Strong-Huttig.

In the junior division short fiction contest, Leah Spaun, a 10th-grade student of Rankin at Parkers Chapel, won first prize for “Broken Dreams.” Second prize went to “A Real Queen” by Jessica Jones, a ninth grader at Parkers Chapel and a student of Kendrick; and third prize went to “Family Heirlooms” by Mallory Smiley, a 10th grader at Parkers Chapel and a student of Rankin.
Honorable mention went to Sawyer Williams, a 10th grader at Parkers Chapel; Karen Williams, a 10th grader at Strong-Huttig; and Katelyn Phillips, a 10th grader at Smackover.

In the junior division essay contest, Philip Hay, a ninth grader at Parkers Chapel and a student of Kendrick, won first prize for “Sword Fighting: A Tale of Two Swords.” Second prize went to “Hilarious Moments” by Audrey Kemp, a ninth grader at Smackover and a student of Richardson. Third prize went to “Find a New Dream” by Benedetti, a ninth grader at Parkers Chapel and a student of Kendrick.
Honorable mention went to Parkers Chapel ninth-grade writers Jessica Jones and Meeks and to Junction City High 10th grader Hunter Hightower.

In the senior division poetry contest, honorable mention went to Daniel Polk, Connor Phillips, Sarah Weldon and Katy Callaway, all seniors at El Dorado High School; Rodney Hill, a junior at El Dorado; Kalan Hammett and Kayela Holland, juniors at Junction City; Kyra Jerry, a senior at Junction City; and McKinley Hudson, Timothy Heath Sims and Taylor McClelland, all seniors at Parkers Chapel.

In the senior division short story contest, Kelsie Hodge won first prize for “Normal.” She is a junior at Junction City and a student of Mindy Sparks. Taylor Stinson, a senior at Parkers Chapel and a student of Becki Schultz, won second prize for “With All My Heart,” and Tillie Watkins, a junior at Strong-Huttig and a student of Deborah Hammons, won third prize for “John Doe.”  Honorable mention went to Mallory Slaughter, Alex Wynn and Summer Day, seniors at Parkers Chapel; and to Alba Martinez, a senior at Smackover.

In the senior essay contest, Kristen Crawley, a junior at El Dorado and a student of Anwar Fairley, won first prize for “Glen.” McKinley Hudson won second prize for “A Love Not Reciprocated.” McKinley is a senior at Parkers Chapel and a student of Schultz. Jacob Pumphrey won third prize for “More than Just a Game.” He is a senior at Junction City and a student of Beth Endel.

Honorable mention went to Hollis Anthony and Katie Eckart, both juniors at El Dorado; Allison McKinnon and Ashley Jackson, both juniors at Parkers Chapel; Kayela Holland, a junior at Junction City; and Roger McKinzie, a senior at Junction City.

Student authors published in Writers’ Ink will receive free copies. Additional copies will be available to the general public and will go on sale in late April for $5 each at the South Arkansas Community College Bookstore on the West Campus at 300 South West Avenue.

The craft of glass etching will be taught in Holiday Glass Etching, a new non-credit class at South Arkansas Community College. Students will create a holiday-themed votive.

The class is $12, which includes supplies, and will be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Nov. 11 in Room 138 of the Center for Workforce Development.
Call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu for more information.

Creative pumpkin decoration is the basis for the Pumpkin-Patch Workshop from 10 to noon on Oct. 9 in Room 121 of the South Arkansas Community College Center for Workforce Development at 3698 E. Main.

The class also will cover how to build a scarecrow and how to make caramel apples.

The workshop is open for anyone age 4 and older. The cost is $10 and will admit two individuals ($5 for each additional individual). Parents and children are encouraged to attend in pairs.

Participants should bring pumpkins and apples.

Call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu for more information.

 

Thousands of people are trying to quit smoking tobacco, and to help local men and women who are seeking to achieve that goal, the South Arkansas Community College Office of Corporate and Community Education will host the free Smoking Cessation Workshop from 10 a.m. to noon on Aug. 21.

Hosted by certified drug- and alcohol-abuse counselor Teresa Pribilsky, the workshop will cover the history of tobacco, pros and cons of quitting and the barriers and strategies to overcome them. She also will provide participants with information about Quitline and how to utilize it.

The workshop, to be held in Room 121 of the Center for Workforce Development at 3698 E. Main in El Dorado, is open to the public but registration is required. For more information call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu. The first 20 to register will receive a gift bag from the Arkansas Department of Health.

Forty-seven Union County high school students have been selected for publication in the thirteenth annual volume of Writers’ Ink, a literary magazine published by South Arkansas Community College and edited by the SouthArk English faculty. 

            During the 2009-10 academic year, high school students were invited through their English teachers to submit original poems, essays, and/or short stories as entries in a creative writing contest with the best submissions to be published in Writers’ Ink. Cash prizes were offered as an additional incentive to enter the contest--$100 for first place, $75 for second, and $50 for third in three literary genres and two age divisions, ninth/tenth grades and eleventh/twelfth grades.   

            The prizes in this year’s contest will be awarded and the magazines distributed at a ceremony on Sunday, April 25, at 2:00 p.m. in the library auditorium on the college’s west campus.  The awards ceremony will be followed by a reception in the library gallery in honor of the student authors and their English teachers.  The public is invited.

            In the junior division poetry contest, Haley Corley, a ninth grade student of Aprile Richardson at Smackover, won first prize with “Seven.”  Second prize went to Kaitlyn Cardin, a tenth grade student of Carol Rankin at Parkers Chapel, for “Poetry Doubts,” and Lexi Benedetti, a ninth grade student of Stacy Kendrick at Parkers Chapel, won third prize with her poem “I am . . .” 

            Winning honorable mention for junior division poetry were Ashley Wilson, Josh Harpole, and Nicole Martin, ninth grade students of Ms. Richardson at Smackover; Haley Brotherton, Molly Jones, and Leah Spaun, tenth grade students of Carol Rankin at Parkers Chapel; Wesley Houldridge, a ninth grade student of Ms. Cardin at Junction City; Darby Gathright, Ashley Haning, and Allyson Meeks, ninth grade students of Ms. Kendrick at Parkers Chapel; and Michael Welch, a tenth grade student of Ms. Forga at Strong-Huttig.

            In the junior division short fiction contest, Leah Spaun, a tenth grade student of Ms. Rankin at Parkers Chapel, won first prize for “Broken Dreams.”  Second prize went to “A Real Queen” by Jessica Jones, a ninth grader at Parkers Chapel and a student of Ms. Kendrick; and third prize went to “Family Heirlooms” by Mallory Smiley, a tenth grader at Parkers Chapel and a student of Ms. Rankin. 

Honorable mention went to Sawyer Williams, a tenth grader at Parkers Chapel and a student of Ms. Rankin; Karen Williams, a tenth grader at Strong-Huttig and a student of Ms. Forga; and Katelyn Phillips, a tenth grader at Smackover and a student of Ms. Richardson.

In the junior division essay contest, Philip Hay, a ninth grader at Parkers Chapel and a student of Ms. Kendrick, won first prize for “Sword Fighting: A Tale of Two Swords.”  Second prize went to “Hilarious Moments” by Audrey Kemp, a ninth grader at Smackover and a student of Ms. Richardson.  Third prize went to “Find a New Dream” by Lexi Benedetti, a ninth grader at Parkers Chapel and a student of Ms Kendrick.

Honorable mention went to two Parkers Chapel writers: Jessica Jones and Allyson Meeks, ninth grade students of Ms. Kendrick and to Hunter Hightower, a tenth grade student of Ms. Endel at Junction City.

            In the senior division poetry contest, honorable mention went to Daniel Polk, Connor Phillips, Sarah Weldon, and Katy Callaway, all seniors at El Dorado and students of Ms. Allen; Rodney Hill, a junior at El Dorado and a student of Mr. Butler; Kalan Hammett and Kayela Holland, juniors at Junction City and students of Ms. Sparks; Kyra Jerry, a senior at Junction City and a student of Ms. Endel; as well as McKinley Hudson, Timothy Heath Sims, and Taylor McClelland, all seniors at Parkers Chapel and students of Ms. Schultz.

            In the senior division short story contest, Kelsie Hodge won first prize for “Normal.”  Kelsie is a junior at Junction City and a student of Ms. Sparks.  Taylor Stinson, a senior at Parkers Chapel and a student of Ms. Schultz, won second prize for “With All My Heart,” and Tillie Watkins, a junior at Strong-Huttig and a student of Ms. Hammons, won third prize for “John Doe.”

            Honorable mention went to Mallory Slaughter, Alex Wynn, and Summer Day, seniors at Parkers Chapel and students of Ms. Schultz and to Alba Martinez, a senior at Smackover and a student of Mr. Ray.

            In the senior essay contest, Kristen Crawley, a junior at El Dorado and a student of Mr. Fairley, won first prize for “Glen.”  McKinley Hudson won second prize for “A Love Not Reciprocated.”  McKinley is a senior at Parkers Chapel and a student of Ms. Schultz.  Jacob Pumphrey won third prize for “More than Just a Game.”  He is a senior at Junction City and a student of Ms. Endel.

Honorable mention went to Hollis Anthony and Katie Eckart, both juniors at El Dorado and students of Mr. Fairley; Allison McKinnon and Ashley Jackson, both juniors at Parkers Chapel and students of Ms. Rankin; Kayela Holland, a junior at Junction City and a student of Ms. Sparks; and Roger McKinzie, a senior at Junction City and a student of Ms. Endel.

            Student authors published in Writers’ Ink will receive free copies.  Additional copies will be available to the general public and will go on sale in late April for $5.00 each at the South Arkansas Community College Bookstore on the west campus at 300 South West Avenue.

Songwriters’ Showcase has lineup of nine performers

EL DORADO, Ark.—Nine singer-songwriters from across the region will take the stage to share their music in the Songwriters’ Showcase from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. on April 9 at the historic Rialto Music Hall downtown here. The event is being hosted by South Arkansas Community College.

The hefty lineup includes a variety of performers and recording artists who come from different musical backgrounds:

David St. Romain of Alexandria, La., was a finalist on the country-music-singing competition “Nashville Star” in 2007 but counts among his influences Boyz II Men and Guns ‘N’ Roses. He has toured the region for seven years on the strength of his album “DSR” and his latest single, “That’s Love.” A new album is due to be released from St. Romain in April.

Brad Wells, a Monroe, La., radio show host, began his interest in performing music at age 14, playing his mother’s acoustic guitar by ear. His interests moved more to an electric, hard-rock sound as he entered high school, but Wells mellowed his music when he began doing solo performances and gigs with a cover band in more recent years. His original music is influenced by Hootie and the Blowfish, the Gin Blossoms and popular musicians of today.


Chris Loggins of El Dorado spent most of his 20s traveling and recording as the lead singer of a harder-edged rock band, but then decided to go solo and strip down his sound, recording his album “Thirty Years” in 2005. He moved back to his hometown, playing a cerebral brand of rock with a noticeable blues influence. Loggins also has a new acoustic album in the works.

General Patterson of Monroe has found recent success with the locally-popular single “North Louisiana Redneck,” but Patterson has been a musician for nearly 40 years, starting out in Nashville, Tenn., in the early 1970s. He currently is recording tracks for a new album and also is writing a novel. Patterson, a grandfather several times over, spent eight years as an archeologist.

Carson Thompson of Delhi, La., began his musical career in church as a teenager. He penned his first song at age 18. Thompson’s music slants toward southern rock, as he calls the Black Crowes one of his biggest musical influences. Thompson plays gigs throughout Louisiana.

Bradley Bridges hails from the northeastern Louisiana area and also began writing songs while still a teenager. Bridges said that he draws inspiration from all types of music, as well as from his Southern upbringing. His first album is nearing release.

Ben Coulter is from Montrose, an Ashley County town of fewer than 500 residents, but has for the last six years traveled throughout the South and Midwest performing the music that he labels “Delta country”—country music infused with Delta blues. He began playing in Christian praise and worship bands as a college student, eventually moving to Branson, Mo., in 2004, performing there for three years and recording several albums. In 2007 he relocated to Nashville, when he cut “Cuzz Volume III: Feel Like Goin’ Home.” And that’s just what Coulter did, moving back to Arkansas and performing at venues like Riverfest in Little Rock, the Louisiana Hayride in Shreveport, La., and the Jammin’ at the Delta Blues Festival in Clarksdale, Miss.

Monty Russell, a Ruston, La., radio personality, first began playing music at age 8 and throughout more than 30 years of performing has shared the stage with artists like Willie Nelson, Dwight Yoakam, David Alan Coe, Blues Traveler, Merle Haggard and Cross Canadian Ragweed. His sound is influenced by honky-tonk and gospel. Russell also acts as a mentor of sorts for younger artists around the region; Thompson and Bridges both list him among their biggest inspirations.

Trey Hawkins of Crossett has been touring and performing around the region for the last dozen years, and has a new live album on its way to release. Hawkins lists among his influences Lynyrd Skynyrd, the Allman Brothers and the Dave Matthews Band. He has played El Dorado’s Musicfest and last year won the New Music Showdown in Little Rock.

Tickets for the Songwriters’ Showcase are $5 and are available in advance at the SouthArk Bookstore at 300 S. West Ave. and at the SouthArk Center for Workforce Development at 3698 E. Main. They also may be purchased over the phone by calling (870) 864-7163. Tickets will be available at the door on the night of the event, but advanced purchase allows for early admittance and provides passes to meet the performers.

Only those 21 and older will be admitted.

PHOTOS:
Coulter, Hawkins, Loggins, Patterson, Russell, St. Romain, Wells.

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Anthony Jones and Lisa Mason of South Arkansas Substance Abuse, third and fourth from left respectively, receive a donation in the amount of $1,000 for their organization from members of Support Through Alliance, Resources and Spirit at South Arkansas Community College recently. The funds were raised through a recent pancake breakfast in El Dorado. The donation is earmarked for the new Specialized Women’s Services treatment center at 123 Hudson.

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March 18, 2010 - Dr. Kermit Parks, left, presents the Dr. Kermit M. Parks Public Service Endowed Scholarship to South Arkansas Community College criminal justice major Amanda Andrews of El Dorado recently. The new scholarship is bestowed to a SouthArk student who is planning a career in public service and is involved in political or community activities. An applicant also must submit an essay. Parks taught political science at SouthArk for 28 years.

Nearly 20 writers from around the region are featured in Between the Lines, the literary journal of South Arkansas Community College. A reading of the 12th volume will take place at 2 p.m. on Dec. 12 at the Library Auditorium on the West Campus.

Those whose work appears in the publication are Richard Allen Ball Jr., Jessica Wayne Jewell-Bristol, Gordon Byrd, Christy Edmonds, Lativia Hall, Robert Love, Cindy Mabry, Richard Mason, Kristen Pope, Edna Isela Ramirez, Janet Ryan, Marcia Wadlington and Elsie Warnock, all of El Dorado; Jim Barton of Huttig; Pat Durmon of Ozark; Pat Kenney of Farmerville, La.; and Troy Lynn Pritt of Warren.

The public is invited to attend the reading.

The South Arkansas Community College music department will transform South Arkansas Arts Center into a medieval dining hall for the Madrigal Feaste, at 6 p.m. on Dec. 14.

This night of eating, drinking, singing and acting is presented in full costume. The evening begins with the town crier’s announcement of incoming guests, performances by strolling musicians and entertainment by the jester. The gourmet food courses will be served by faculty and staff of SouthArk dressed as serving wenches, nuns and monks.

The SouthArk singers will sit at the royal table surrounding a king and queen appointed for the feaste. Local thespians will act out adventures, members of the audience are sentenced to the pillory (released by raising money for scholarships) and a short concert of madrigals will be presented.

The proceeds from the evening go to the SouthArk foundation for choral scholarships.   

Tickets are $50 and are available to buy at the SouthArk Bookstore at 300 S. West Ave.

Ken’s Discount in El Dorado recently donated these two picnic tables to the South Arkansas Community College Foundation for use at the college. From left are SouthArk’s Alene Drummond, Ken Discount’s Ken Blackmon and SouthArk’s Tom Posey.

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gorman-brettBrett Gorman, a 2010 graduate of Junction City High School, has accepted an Albert W. Loftin Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.

He is the son of Monica Gorman and Scotty Gorman of Junction City and was a member of the football and baseball teams at JCHS.

More than 50 scholarships have been awarded by the Union County Single-Parent Scholarship Fund Board of Directors for the Spring 2010 semester.

South Arkansas Community College students Angie Aaron, Takarra Artis, Jennifer Aubrey, Monica Bailey, Jeanie Baker, Dana Bibby, Kyna Booker, Joyce Brock, Kendra Brock, Andrea Brown, Christie Choate, Shavonne Collins, Heather Conley, Jazzilyn Curley, Tomeaka Fields, Eleece Frazier, Ratisha Gill, Deatred Glover, Nadene Goin, Lativia Hall, Brianna Hargett, Jay Henard, Kimberly Henry, Stephanie Ingle, Tina Jackson, Michael Jinks, Kelly Jones, Majuna Jones, Tamekia Kesee, Tequila Lee, Kashama Loggins, Ashley Lowery, Deborah Lumsey, Victoria Lumsey, Kristie Morgan, Melissa Moore, Keelie Murphy, Inez Robinson, Brittney Rogers, Kristerica Scott, Bobbie Smith, Chazney Smith, Kinetra Swift, Porsha Teasley, Chrystal Thurman, Romona Tolbert, Jeff Purtle, Kemia Watson, Roxanne White, Marion Wood and Karen Worth each received an award.

To be eligible, a student must live in Union County, be enrolled in any college or university and be a single parent providing support of a dependent child or children under the age of 18 in the household.  

For more information about donating to the scholarship fund or applying for a scholarship, contact the Financial Aid Office at South Arkansas Community College at (870) 864-7150.

Deadline for the fall 2010 semester is Sept. 1.

Ken’s Discount in El Dorado recently donated these two picnic tables to the South Arkansas Community College Foundation for use at the college. From left are SouthArk’s Alene Drummond, Ken Discount’s Ken Blackmon and SouthArk’s Tom Posey.

picnictables

Janet_Notre_DameDr. Janet Ply, co-founder of Pendére in 1993, specializes in building effective software and system delivery practices for Fortune 500 clients.  She has 20+ years experience managing large, complex software solutions domestically and internationally and has taught software project management classes to hundreds of people.  Janet is currently the program director of a $660M program to redesign the electric grid for the state of Texas.

Janet is a frequent speaker at numerous Information Systems conferences, the latest being in Paris, France and San Jose, CA. 

She has a BS in mathematics, an MS in Engineering, MS in Procurement and Acquisition Management, and PhD in Information Technology. She is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) through the Project Management Institute and is certified by the Software Engineering Institute as to assess organizational software processes.    Janet is an instrument-rated pilot, getting her private pilot’s license in 1979 out of Conway, Arkansas.  She frequently flies patients for medical treatment as a member of the South Central Chapter of Angel Flight.

 

womens_history-small

March is National Women’s History Month, and SouthArk will celebrate the role of women in American history and society with a book display in the library, an exhibit in the atrium of the Whitfield Building and in the student center of the McGehee Building, and a panel discussion called “A Celebration of Women’s History” on March 17 in the gym between 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. 

The panel will consist of Ms. Carolyn Dykes, a former police detective with the El Dorado Police Department; Dr. Kristi Mitchell Elia, a local dentist; and Ms. Diane Tatum, the Regional Customer Service Manager for Entergy Arkansas in Pine Bluff. 

They will discuss the women from American history whom they admire, the women from their own lives who have inspired them, and the changes they have observed firsthand in the role of
women in American society. 

At the end of the program, the panelists will take questions from the audience.  The public is invited.

Follow these links to places on the web where a wealth of information is available on the role of women in American history.

1.         National Women’s History Project: http://www.nwhp.org/

2.         Women’s History Month: http://womenshistorymonth.gov/

3.         Teaching Resources for Women’s History Month:  http://www.free.ed.gov/resource.cfm?resource_id=2126

4.         National Women’s Hall of Fame:  http://www.greatwomen.org/

5.         Cengage Learning’s National Women’s History Month Page:  http://www.gale.cengage.com/free_resources/whm/

 

 

 

On March 10th, enjoy a poetry reading featuring original works by Poets of the Pines while learning more about poetry and this wonderful group. 

Program begins at Noon

SouthArk Center for Workforce Development, 3698 E. Main

South Arkansas Poets of the Pines was organized in June 2009 at Barton Library by Jim Barton as a branch of Poets Roundtable of Arkansas. Jim has been a member of PRA since 2007, and he wanted to offer a poetry avenue for the southern portion of Arkansas. The purpose of the organization is to teach, study and celebrate the art and craft of poetry and to support poets and poetry especially in our home state of Arkansas.  Poets of the Pines currently boasts 16 members from El Dorado, Camden, Hampton, Bearden, Silver Hill, Quinn and Huttig who study poetic forms, critique work, share their writing, hold contests and try to spread the joy of good poetry through community outreach. 

Poets of the Pines are helping to sponsor five contests for Arkansas students this year, as well as a contest for all Arkansas residents in the annual Arkansas Poetry Day celebration in October.

Bring your lunch and spend your break learning something new!  Drinks & desserts furnished by SouthArk.

South Arkansas Community College will be participating in the annual African-American Read-In on Wednesday, February 24 from 3-4 PM in the South Arkansas Community College Library Auditorium.  The event is being held as part of a nationwide celebration by the National Council of Teachers of English to commemorate great African-American writers and poets. 

“We are proud to present the Read-In as part of our efforts to promote literacy and to inspire students and the community alike with beautiful words by writers past and present,” noted Dr. Ken Bridges, History Professor at the college and organizer for the event at SouthArk. 

In 2009, more than one million people participated in the African-American Read-In in events held across the United States and Canada.  This will be the twenty-first year that the Read-In is held nationally and the fifth year at SouthArk. 

“Art knows no boundary of race,” Bridges added.  “This is a celebration for the whole community, and everyone is welcome.”

The college is also asking for volunteer readers from the community to participate in reading a selection to the audience.  Admission to the Feb. 24 Read-In is free and open to the public.  For more information on attending or reading for the event, contact Ken Bridges at 862-8131, ext. 126 or at kbridges@southark.edu.  

 

EL DORADO, Ark.—Tickets now are on sale for the Save the Date Bridal and Special Events Fair, set for 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on April 3 at the Center for Workforce Development, 3698 E. Main on the East Campus of South Arkansas Community College here.

A variety of exhibits on wedding planning, bridal fashions and special-event catering will be on display and networking opportunities with industry professionals will be available. Door prizes also will be given.

Tickets are $5 and are available at the CWD and at the SouthArk Bookstore, 300 S. West Ave. on the West Campus. Children under age 12 are admitted free and parents with strollers are welcome.

For more information call (870) 864-7192, e-mail ce@southark.edu or visit tiny.cc/savethedate.

Sue Nash of the Radiation Therapy Center of the Medical Center of South Arkansas, far right, accepts newly-styled wigs from Shannon Rogers, far left, and the students in one of her cosmetology classes at South Arkansas Community College last week. The wigs, which are free to use by women suffering from hair loss due to medical conditions, needed updating, Nash said. She contacted SouthArk’s cosmetology department, which fixed the wigs as a skill-building exercise for its students.

cosmetology_wigs

SouthArk-hands12A collaborative effort among the South Arkansas Community College Employee Club, the SouthArk chapter of Phi Beta Lamba and Northwest Environmental Studies Academy let to Helping Hands for Haiti, which raised funds for those affected by the recent earthquake in that country.

A total of $1,200 was raised and split evenly between the Employee Club and PBL; the club donated its half to the Haiti Education Foundation while PBL donated to the Red Cross Haiti Relief and Development Fund.

“Anything we can do to increase student activity and help our community come together makes me feel good,” Employee Club President Dr. Tim Kirk said.

Northwest also lent a hand in the fundraising—actually more than a hundred of them. Students at the school traced their hands on construction paper and cut them out. In turn, one of these was placed on a replica of the Haitian flag each time that someone donated money. The flag was displayed in the Whitfield Building Atrium on SouthArk’s West Campus.

Additionally, members of the Sigma Epsilon Chapter of PBL at SouthArk distributed more than 500 Red Cross fact sheets throughout the area.

PHOTOS
SouthArk Hands 1: Christin English, a student in Cara Jobe’s second-grade class at Northwest Environmental Studies Academy, cuts out a silhouette of her hand for use in the Helping Hands for Haiti project at South Arkansas Community College.

SouthArk-hands1
 
SouthArk Hands 2: From left, SouthArk Phi Beta Lambda members Tiona Bradley, Noah Moses and Jessica Murry distribute Red Cross information.

On behalf of Dr. Jones (who is heading out of town on business), I am sharing with you the news that the lease agreement between SouthArk and the City of El Dorado for management and occupation of the new conference center was signed about an hour and a half ago (see photo).

This document was agreed to by both parties some weeks before Christmas but needed official state approval. That approval now has been received, allowing the college and city to move forward with signing off on the agreement formally this morning.

Congratulations are in order. And as we all have been able to see as construction progresses across the street from the Whitfield Building, the new center will be a wonderful venue for SouthArk, the city and the area as a whole.

signing

In the attached image are, from left, El Dorado Mayor Mike Dumas, SouthArk attorney Matthew Shepherd and our own Dr. Barbara Jones, in Shepherd’s El Dorado office this morning.

Calling South Arkansas Community College “a big part of the national education strategy,” Arkansas Sen. Mark Pryor visited SouthArk’s West Campus on Wednesday and was apprised of some of the college’s new and ongoing projects.

Touring the campus, Pryor was shown the future sites of the Health Science Center and the El Dorado Conference Center, both currently under construction, which will be utilized by the college.

Pryor asked a number of questions of both president Dr. Barbara Jones and vice president of learning Dr. Val Cantu, who took him on the tour. He showed particular interest in local partnership efforts with area businesses and industries.

“A community college can tailor to the education needs of a community,” Pryor said.

Earlier Pryor met with a group of SouthArk employees and students. He learned of a new $3.5 million grant, South Arkansas Healthcare Opportunities, provided through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act that SouthArk had been awarded just a few days prior. Health and natural sciences dean Dr. George Roberts gave the senator an overview of the projects that the grant will cover.

Pryor also fielded a few questions from those in attendance and provided some information about his activities in Washington as they relate to higher education in general and community colleges specifically.

mark_pryor
 
PHOTO: SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones, far right, discusses new college building projects with Arkansas Sen. Mark Pryor, center, in front of the Whitfield Building on Wednesday. Vice president Dr. Val Cantu also looks on.

Upward Bound at South Arkansas Community College will host its second annual GospelFest at 6 p.m. on March 6 at the SouthArk Gymnasium. Tickets are $5. Contact Debra Mock at (870) 864-7100 or dmock@southark.edu for more information.

 

 

The South Arkansas Community College emergency medical services program has been awarded two grants from the Arkansas Department of Health that total nearly $10,000.

The first grant is provided to all participating advanced-level training sites under the Medicare Rural Hospital Grant Program. The MRHG funds total $4,190 and are divided into advanced training equipment purchases and paramedic scholarships.

The second grant provides $5,462 for the initial training of basic emergency medicine students and is funded by the Arkansas Trauma System.

“In working to pass legislation establishing a statewide trauma system, one immediate need that was identified was the shortage of EMTs and paramedics across the state,” SouthArk EMS program director Ken Kelley said. “With the funding provided under these grants, SouthArk will be able to continue our efforts to supply highly-trained, well-qualified EMS personnel throughout the service area. For our students, this opens the door for career opportunities in emergency medical services.”

Kelley is a member of the Governor’s Trauma Advisory Council.

SouthArk’s state-defined service area includes Ashley, Union, Bradley and Chicot Counties.

kelley
 
PHOTO: SouthArk emergency medicine program director Ken Kelley, far right, demonstrates with a volunteer “victim” how to use an automatic external defibrillator recently.

Before a crowd that braved late-winter snows on Feb. 11 to see and hear him, noted community developer Bill Strickland stated upon his introduction that he did not have a lecture to present.

Since Strickland had been brought to SouthArk to give the final address in the 2009-2010 SouthArk Lecture Series, the statement might have taken some of those in attendance by surprise.

But in short order, Strickland clarified.

“I stopped writing prepared speeches. I find that people were more interested in the length of the speech than its content,” he said. “I believe in being a person, and telling what your story is.”

And so the Pittsburgh native told his story, explaining how his innovative approach to reaching the disenfranchised poor has achieved such success that it now is being mimicked in a number of places all over the country.

Strickland said the he was a flunking high-school student himself before a ceramics teacher’s craft caught his eye. His developing interest in this artistic pursuit was enough to keep him in school, but his grades still were not great. The teacher insisted that he had too much talent not to further his education, so Strickland took the SAT—and tanked.

He was able to enter the University of Pittsburgh only on probationary measures, but then, finding his niche, soared to success.

Now Strickland is a member of Pittsburgh’s board of trustees.

“I actually sit on the board that let me in on probation,” Strickland said.

While still a university student, Strickland began the Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild as an after-school program in 1968. His successes in reaching out to and training inner-city young people in this poor Pittsburgh neighborhood encouraged the directors of the nearby Bidwell Training Center to approach him about assuming leadership of that organization in 1972. Strickland did, and saw similar successes in training young disenfranchised adult workers.

The success of both projects prompted Strickland to launch a capital campaign in the late 1980s that grew Manchester Bidwell into a vocational and arts center with separate divisions that focus on culinary training, pharmaceutical research, jazz music, horticulture and a wide array of other disciplines, partnering with regional and national industries.

Strickland showed pride in the beauty and majesty of the MCG facilities. Utilizing a photographic slide show, the speaker said that his institution’s students deserve to attend school in a beautiful environment even though they are in a poor inner-city area.

“It’s in the toughest neighborhood in Pittsburgh...deliberately,” Strickland said of MCG. “People are a function of their environments.

Attitude and environment drive behavior.”

The speaker said that he added serene courtyards, fountains and live flowers to MCG because the poor students who he caters to need them and take pride in them...and that on some level, it inspires them to want more from life.

Strickland said that society’s poor do not lack talent, but need to be shown a clear route out of their situations. The training that they have received at MCG has helped students find jobs and become productive citizens, Strickland said, or to go on to college—something that he said happens at a very high rate.

“I’ve got it figured out: The thing that children need the most is hope,” Strickland said. “I’m in the attitude business, not just the training business.”

Now Strickland’s model is being used in places all over the country...and possibly in the future, will be imitated throughout the world.

“The only thing that happens to be wrong with poor people is that they don’t have any money,” Strickland said.

strickland

Bill Strickland shakes hands with the public after his speech.

aedSouth Arkansas Community College has taken steps to make its campuses safer in the event of medical emergencies by adding automatic external defibrillators.

AEDs are electronic devices that help restore the pumping action of the heart for victims of sudden cardiac arrest. Each year, more than 600,000 people die of heart disease, and a large majority of them die before reaching a hospital. But communities have seen a reduction in these deaths when AEDs, used to "shock" the heart back into an organized rhythm, are available.

SouthArk has placed one AED on its East Campus and one on its West Campus. The AED on the East Campus is in Room 103 of the McGehee Building; the one on the West Campus is in the receptionist office of the Whitfield Building. Either is accessible to anyone who needs one of the devices in an emergency situation.

Any bystander willing to assist a victim of heart trauma can follow the three-step instructions printed on the AED’s case, and the machine’s audio prompts.
A commitment already has been made to add AEDs as SouthArk expands. The devices cost about $1,300.

“Having AEDs on campus demonstrates SouthArk's commitment to providing no only a heart safe campus, but also helps in providing a heart safe community,” SouthArk emergency medicine program director Ken Kelley said.
 
PHOTO: SouthArk emergency medicine program director Ken Kelley, left, demonstrates on a volunteer “victim” how to use an automatic external defibrillator at the Whitfield Building Atrium on the West Campus recently.

SouthArk's annual African-American Read-In will be held on Wednesday, February 24 from 3-4 PM in the Library Auditorium here on campus.  This is a part of a nationwide effort to celebrate great African-American writers and poets during African-American History Month.  This event has been held at SouthArk each February for the last couple of years, and it has been a very popular cultural event each time.

As part of the Read-In, we need volunteer readers.  We are asking for readers both inside and outside the college community.  We need you!  If you have a short piece in mind and would like to present it, please contact me.  If you wish to participate but are unsure of what you may want to read, please contact Prof. Jennifer Baine at jbaine@southark.edu or at ext. 221.

South Ark Stars will be hosting a pancake fundraiser on March 13th, 2010 at St Mary’s Parish hall.

Time 7:30 am to 11am

Tickets will be $5 in advance; $6 at the door.

We will be serving pancakes, sausage, coffee, orange juice, and water.

Proceeds to benefit the South Arkansas Substance Abuse Women and Children’s Half-way House.

Please contact Kathy Waldrop at 864-8433 or Valerie Lewis 864-7153 for ticket information.

The Cheer Dance Clinic will be held for two age groups, 6 to 10 and 11 to 15, from 9 to noon on Sept. 18 at the South Arkansas Community College Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus.

Instructor Caylie Covas, a member of the Southern Arkansas University dance team, will along with assistants teach students one fight song and one dance and pinpoint ways to improve form and skill.

The cost is $15.

For more information call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu.

Circle THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4th in red on your calendars. That’s the day SouthArk will join the

American Heart Association (AHA)’s fight against heart disease by holding Wear Red Day. We encourage everyone to participate by wearing red to work to help the AHA raise women’s (and men’s) awareness of cardiovascular disease and empower women to reduce their risk. Seventy-three percent of SouthArk’s 1800 students are women. Seventy percent of the full- and part-time faculty and staff at SouthArk are women. Similar to many of you, I have family members and friends that have suffered and died from various types of heart disease.  We must be aware of risks and consider lifestyle changes to improve our health.

We are proud to be join the AHA and concerned companies and organizations across America in the fight against the #1 killer of women – as well as of men. Wear Red Day is a chance for us to arm ourselves with knowledge about this devastating disease. We are not collecting donations at SouthArk this year, but if you choose to donate to AHA (see below), funds will help the AHA advance its research and education efforts.

As part of the awareness, the Health and Natural Science Division will host blood pressure screenings and provide informational brochures on ways to prevent heart disease at the East and West Campus as noted below:

8:00- 10:00 A  - East Campus – Billy McGhee Building Student Center

10:00A-12:00 – West Campus – Whitfield Classroom Building Atrium

Thanks for showing your support by wearing RED next Thursday.

The Rialto Music Hall: It’s Past, Present and Future is the topic of the Feb. 17 Noon Symposium at South Arkansas Community College, hosted by the Office of Corporate and Community Education in Room 121 of the SouthArk Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus.

City of El Dorado downtown businessman Richard Mason will be the featured speaker. He and his wife Vertis Mason have restored 17 buildings in El Dorado.

The event is free and open to the public, but reservations are required. Those who attend are encouraged to bring lunches with them. Drinks and dessert will be provided by SouthArk.

For more information, call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu.

The Sigma Epsilon Chapter of Phi Beta Lambda at South Arkansas Community College recently presented a check for $650 as well as boxes of food valued at more than $500 to the domestic-abuse crisis center Turning Point of South Arkansas. 

PBL selected Turning Point as the beneficiary of one of its primary community-service projects of the year because some of its members said that they have been victimized by domestic violence themselves, either directly or indirectly.

Future Business Leaders of America-Phi Beta Lambda is a non-profit education association with a quarter million students who are preparing for careers in business and business-related fields.


pbl-turning-point


PHOTO: SouthArk Phi Beta Lambda representatives Martha Dunn, far left, and Marla Benson, far right, donate items to Turning Point’s Glendora Lee, second from left, and Barbara Biddle.

A variety of dance classes will be offered through the South Arkansas Community College Office of Corporate and Community Education in upcoming weeks, including East-coast swing, country two-step, beginner three-step and advanced waltz.
For more information, download the 2010 winter-spring catalog, available at www.southark.edu under the “Corporate and Community Education” link; call (870) 864-7192; or e-mail ce@southark.edu.

Four new entrepreneurship classes are being offered by the South Arkansas Community College Office of Corporate and Community Education in the coming weeks.

Make Your Mark, Fundamental Selling, Introduction to Online Social Networking and Blog for Business are introductory-level courses geared toward budding entrepreneurs and small-business owners who are seeking growth opportunities.
For more information, download the 2010 winter-spring catalog, available at www.southark.edu under the “Corporate and Community Education” link; call (870) 864-7192; or e-mail ce@southark.edu.

American University Tutorial Test                             Name:

Spring 2010                                                                         Instructor:

Email address:

 

After completing the American University Tutorial, complete this test and submit it to Francis Kuykendall fkuykendall@southark.edu . On the subject line type: Student – Ballard.

 

Circle the letter of the best answer in the following multiple choice questions.

 

  1. How has the volume of heroin production changed over the past 10 years?
    1. This question is too broad.
    2. This question is too narrow.
    3. This question cannot be answered.
    4. This question is a good research question.

 

  1. How many females are professors in the People’s Republic of China?
    1. Question is too broad.
    2. The question cannot be answered.
    3. Question is too narrow.
    4. This is a good research question.

 

  1. Should religious schools be permitted under charter school programs?
    1. This question is a good research question.
    2. This question is too broad.
    3. This question is too narrow.
    4. This question cannot be answered.

 

  1. What are the causes of poverty?
    1. This question is too broad.
    2. This question is too narrow.
    3. This question cannot be answered.
    4. This is a good research question.

 

  1. Good Housekeeping is a
    1. Scholarly journal
    2. Magazine
    3. Trade / Professional journal

 

  1. Journal of American History is a
    1. Scholarly journal
    2. Magazine
    3. Trade / professional journal

 

 

 

 

 

 

Circle the letter (s) of the types of sources that would be most useful for getting the information needed. (You can choose more than one.)

 

  1. What is the latest position of the United Auto Workers on nationalized healthcare?
    1. Book
    2. Scholarly journal article
    3. Magazine article
    4. Trade / Professional Journal article
    5. Newspaper article
    6. UAW Web site

 

  1. What does the latest scientific research reveal about the problems in formulating an AIDS / HIV vaccine?
    1. Book
    2. Scholarly Journal article
    3. Magazine article
    4. Trade / Professional Journal article
    5. Newspaper article
    6. World Health Organization Web site

 

  1. Does online education work for students with relational learning styles?
    1. Book
    2. Scholarly Journal article
    3. Magazine article
    4. Professional / Trade Journal article
    5. Newspaper article
    6. Web site by a distant education student

 

You are writing a paper on the research question: Should libraries censor the Internet? Fort this project you are supposed to use only scholarly sources. Evaluate the following citations and circle the letter (s) of the answers. (There can be more than one answer. Circle the letter  for all of them)

 

  1. Jennifer Doe, Professor of Biology. “Libraries and the First Amendment” in Time Magazine.
    1. Author lacks authority
    2. Source is not intended for a scholarly audience
    3. Source is likely to be biased
    4. None of the above

 

  1. Jeremy Doe, Professor of Communication. Free Speech and the Internet: A Postmodern Conflict, published by American University Press.
    1. Author lacks authority
    2. Source is not intended for a scholarly audience
    3. Source is likely to be biased
    4. None of the above

 

 

 

  1. Jan Doe, Library Director at a University Library. “Get off Our Backs!: Freedom, Libraries and the Patriot Act” in the Unabashed Librarian.
    1. Author lacks authority
    2. Source is not intended for a scholarly audience
    3. Source is likely to be biased
    4. None of the above

 

Answer the questions concerning where citations are needed in the following paragraphs.

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), passed by the United States Congress in 1998, makes any attempt to bypass software intended to protect copyright on digital files a criminal offense. (1)  The DMCA is intended to help combat the serious problem of intellectual property theft in the international arena, such as the estimated $245 million of lost revenue resulting from pirated software in India in 2001. (2)

 

According to Adam Disgrau of the American Library Association, the DMCA changed the emphasis from whether people use information in such a way as to violate copyright to prohibitions about how they access information. (3)  Many legal scholars, such as Cassandra Imfeld, believe the DMCA as written is unconstitutional and unjust. (4)  “By punishing the actual offenders instead of the individuals who provide the tools, fair use can encourage the dissemination of information and protect the First Amendment rights of freedom of speech and the press.” (5)

 

  1. Do you need a citation at (1)?
    1. Yes, a citation is needed here.
    2. No, a citation is not needed here.

 

  1. 14. Do you need a citation at (2)?
    1. Yes, a citation is needed here.
    2. No, a citation is not needed here.

 

  1. Do you need a citation at (3)?
    1. Yes, a citation is needed here.
    2. No, a citation is not needed here.

 

  1. Do you need a citation at (4)?
    1. Yes, a citation is needed here.
    2. No, a citation is not needed here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2010-winterspring-noncreditThe Winter / Spring edition of the 2010 Non-Credit course schedule is available for download.  Get your copy of the Winter / Spring Non-Credit Catalog here.

stricklandCommunity developer Bill Strickland of Pittsburgh will be the third and final speaker in the 2009-2010 South Arkansas Community College Lecture Series at 7 p.m. on Feb. 11 at the SouthArk Gymnasium.

Strickland will present “The Art of Leadership and the Business of Social Change” and afterwards take questions from the audience and autograph copies of his book “Make the Impossible Possible,” which will be available to buy. A reception will follow.
The event is free and open to the public.

Strickland is the president of Manchester Bidwell Corporation, which in part uses the arts to inspire inner-city young people to achieve success in all areas of their lives. Another component of the corporation is job training. Strickland won the MacArthur Fellowship (also known as the “Genius Award”) for these efforts.

Born in 1947, he grew up in inner-city Pittsburgh (in a neighborhood that his program would bear later, Manchester). Strickland credits the inspiration of a high-school art teacher who was skilled with pottery for changing his life. From that grew the Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild, a subsidiary of Manchester Bidwell, which Strickland began as an after-school arts program while still in college.
Strickland is a 1969 cum laude graduate of the University of Pittsburgh with a bachelor’s degree in American history and foreign relations.
The decline of the steel industry brought widespread unemployment to the Pittsburgh area in the early 1970s and because of his successes at MCG, Strickland was asked in 1971 to assume leadership of Bidwell Training Center (now also a subsidiary of Manchester Bidwell), which offered vocational training to displaced workers.

Today, MCG Youth draws about 3,900 young people annually through classes and workshops; MCG Arts brings in artists of national stature through lectures and visits; MCG Jazz promotes and preserves jazz music; and BTC provides market-driven career education through partnerships with local industries.

Strickland has been asked to replicate Manchester Bidwell’s model throughout the country.

“If this country has a future, it’s because of the ability to form visions and partnerships,” Strickland said. “I believe that we can change the United States of America in my lifetime. We’ve got to change the way this country sees itself.”

The SouthArk Lecture Series began during the 2006-2007 academic year as an educational and cultural program that would present noteworthy speakers from a variety of disciplines to the college and the community at large.

PHOTO: Strickland

spring2010schedulesicon Spring 2010 Schedule

Course schedules for the Spring 2010 semester have been completed and are available for download here or you may obtain a print copy at the admissions office.

2009-2010 CatalogSouthArk produces a new catalog every year. It provides critical information on admissions requirements, financial obligations, and graduation requirements. To view the current catalog, please click below.

 Catalogs are in Adobe .pdf format.   You must have Adobe Reader installed on your computer to view these pages.  If you need Adobe Reader, you can download it here.

 

 

SouthArk Trustees Announce President Search Committee

Steve Cousins, South Arkansas Community College Board Chair, has announced formation of the SouthArk Presidential Search Committee. 

The fifteen-person committee is made up of college and community representatives.  The committee will review all applications for the SouthArk presidency, recently vacated by Alan Rasco, who accepted a position with Texarkana Community College effective March 30. 

Within four to six weeks, the search committee is scheduled to submit semi-finalists to the SouthArk Board of Trustees, who will narrow the field to finalists.

Finalists will visit SouthArk and the community and be interviewed in person. Interim President Dr. Terry Puckett, who will facilitate the search process, noted that “While the Board hopes to choose and announce a new president by mid-summer, the most important thing is to find a good fit.  Hiring a new president is the most important thing a college Board of Trustees will ever do.”

Acknowledging the hard work and extensive time commitment required, Cousins said “The Board of Trustees is very pleased and grateful that such high caliber and very busy people have agreed to serve the college on and perform the important work of the Presidential Search Committee.”

SouthArk Presidential Search Committee
Approved by the SouthArk Board of Trustees 3.31.09

SouthArk Board of Trustee Representatives (4)
 
 Trustee Chair Steve Cousins
 Trustee Steve Cameron*
 Trustee David Ross
 Trustee Charlie Thomas*

 Trustees appointed by the Chair

SouthArk Representatives (5)
 
 Administrative Staff  Vernie Meador  
 Professional Staff Becky Riggs    
 Classified Staff Susan Jordan   
 Faculty-Academic Dr. Carolyn Langston*
 Faculty-Technical Mark Nelson

 NOTE:  Staff were recommended by Interim President Puckett who is facilitating
 the President Search. Faculty representatives were elected by their peers; one
 faculty representing academic courses and one representing technical courses.

Community Representatives (5)

 Wayne Gibson* – Murphy Oil Corp.
 Joe Hurst – City of  El Dorado
 Chuck Long – Medical Center of South Arkansas
 Deborah Nolan* – Niehuss Land Co.
 Mark Smith – Mark Smith Communications 

Nominated by the Board of Trustees PSC Process Committee:  John Dews, Sherrel Johnson & David Ross

Ex-Officio Representative (1)
 
 Interim President (non-voting) Dr. Terry Puckett

*SouthArk Foundation Board
fieldsshayla reeveserin
Shayla Fields Erin Reeves

EL DORADO, Ark.—Shayla Fields, a 2001 graduate of Marion High School, and Erin Reeves, a 2010 graduate of home schooling, have accepted scholarships to attend South Arkansas Community College here in the fall.
Fields received the Employee Club Scholarship and Reeves the President’s Scholarship.
 
PHOTOS: Reeves, Fields.

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  Steve Blair

Steve Blair, a 2010 graduate of Smackover High School, has accepted the Trades and Industry Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.

Blair is the son of Steve Blair and Stephanie Brown-Massie, both of Smackover. At Smackover High he was a member of the Future Business Leaders of America, the French Club, the baseball team and the football team.
 
PHOTO: Student Steve Blair.


 
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Shana Welch of El Dorado, left, and Keri Shankles of Hampton, occupational therapy students at South Arkansas Community College, create messages in shaving cream on a mirror as part of a lab on Monday. The lab was designed to teach sense recognition to the students.

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Alicia Simpson, right, of El Dorado pulls Alison North of Marion, La., on a wheeled sled used in occupational therapy during a sensory lab at South Arkansas Community College on Monday. The two are students in SouthArk’s occupational therapy assistant program. The lab was designed to teach students how to recognize which sets of senses are used in a variety of activities.

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Dr. Bill Scurlock of El Dorado, center, donates copies of his devotional book “The Exam Room” to, from left, South Arkansas Community College health-science faculty members Keitha Davidson, Dr. George Roberts and Nita Green; and SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones. Scurlock recently donated 50 copies that will be kept in the offices of health-science instructors and available for student use.

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Seven years ago, this year’s Jodie Mahony Scholarship recipient was praying for guidance about taking a job with Halliburton that would relocate her to Kuwait City.

Barbara “Barbi” Brodnax—then Barbara Pratt—had worked for two years as a warehouse inventory clerk for the construction companies that built Entegra-Union Power Station just outside of El Dorado. When the power plant was completed, she accepted a temporary position to help transfer construction inventory to the permanent warehouse on the power plant site.

The Halliburton job would be lucrative and exciting, but potentially dangerous. At age 46, Brodnax had lived her entire life in small Union County towns, mostly in Strong. The change would be dramatic and come just two years following the tragic death of her 16-year-old daughter in a four-wheeler accident.

Divorced in 1999, she met John Brodnax while both were working at the power plant site. Today John is an engineering specialist for Union Power. While on a Saturday afternoon date, John was at Barbi’s side when the Hallibuton e-mail arrived advising her when and where to report for training before leaving the states. John looked at her and said, “I love you, and I don’t want you to go.”  

They married shortly thereafter and Barbi Broadnax returned to Herring Furniture, where she had worked off and on for many years.  

“Entegra is dear to me,” said Brodnax.  “While employed by the construction companies that built it, I met the love of my life there, and still feel as though I am a part of the power plant family. Bill and Glenda O'Brien are two of the most wonderful people I know. As the recipient of this scholarship, it is an honor for me to be photographed with Bill.”

Driven to improve herself, Barbi Brodnax at age 52 enrolled at South Arkansas Community College in the fall of 2009. During that first semester and with her confidence buoyed by a 4.0 grade-point average, she decided to complete an associate’s degree in order to transfer to a four-year school and pursue a degree in music education, a career that would combine her love for playing the piano and teaching children.

“Teaching music in my home to the children of my community has been a joy, but I feel that I owe my students more than what I can give them today,” she said. “To be able to teach music in schools will allow me to give back to my community something that we desperately need:  the appreciation and love of music. “

Mrs. Brodnax applied for multiple scholarships, and in the Spring of this year was one of several finalists for the Jodie Mahony Scholarship. The endowed scholarship covers books, tuition and fees for students enrolled in associate of arts degree programs at SouthArk—programs that provide the first two years of a four-year degree—and is based on academic achievement.

Mahony’s friends, colleagues and family established the scholarship in 2007 through the SouthArk Foundation to honor his 36 years of public service to the community and state. Barbi Brodnax is the third scholarship recipient, and the first recipient following Mahony’s death from cancer in December of last year.

In mid April of this year, SouthArk instructors Mary Pat Cook and Bettie Mahony (wife of the late Mr. Mahony) and SouthArk Board member Sherrel Johnson, who led the scholarship fundraising effort, interviewed scholarship finalists.  

Mrs. Brodnax did not know of Jodie’s connection to the power plant where she once worked.

“It was clear in the interview that Barbi had no idea how much Jodie had to do with the power plant being able to locate and operate in Union County. Nor was she aware that Union Power was the lead donor for Jodie’s scholarship fund,” said Johnson, who as a former chief executive of the El Dorado Chamber of Commerce had worked closely with Jodie Mahony on legislation and other state agency issues related to the power plant. “The situation added a great deal of charm to the interview.”

Bettie Mahony said that Barbi Brodnax is exactly the kind of student that the Mahony Scholarship was designed to help.

“She is hard working, enthusiastic and committed to learning,” Bettie Mahony said. “In addition, she hopes to teach in a public elementary school when she graduates, something that would please Jodie since strengthening public education in Arkansas was his passion. Those of us at SouthArk love having students like Barbi in our classes. She reminds us why we went into teaching, and I am delighted she was selected for the scholarship.”

SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones said that the local community has impressed her with its generosity.

“I had the distinct privilege last fall of spending time on a couple of occasions talking education with Jodie Mahony. The conversations we had assisted me in becoming familiar with SouthArk and the community,” Jones said. “They also provided significant insight and broadened my perspective of higher education and relevant education legislation in Arkansas.

“Mrs. Brodnax is the good fit for Jodie Mahony’s scholarship, and she is representative of all the opportunities SouthArk can offer a non-traditional student.“

PHOTO: From left, SouthArk instructor Bettie Ann Mahony, wife of the late Jodie Mahony; SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones; Entegra vice president of engineering and operations Bill O’Brien; Emon Mahony, brother of Jodie Mahony; scholarship recipient Barbara Brodnax; SouthArk Foundation Board member Dr. Carolyn Langston; SouthArk instructor Mary Pat Cook; and Mahony Scholarship fundraising coordinator Sherrel Johnson.

Classic New Orleans, a cajun-creole cooking class, is from 6 to 8 p.m. on Sept. 30 in the kitchen at the South Arkansas Community College Gymnasium on the West Campus.

Instructor Cathy Harrell, born and raised in the Crescent City, said that “many cookbooks nowadays add unnecessary ingredients” to the dishes of the region, and so she strips recipes down to what would have been available during the time of her great-grandmother.

The class will cover crawfish etoufee and red beans and rice.

For more information call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu.