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Shane Broadway, the interim director of the Arkansas Department of Higher Education, will deliver the keynote address at fall commencement exercises of South Arkansas Community College.

The event will take place at 7 p.m. on Dec. 16 at the El Dorado Municipal Auditorium. College administrators decided to hold commencement at the auditorium to better accommodate the large class of 380 graduates and theirwell wishers.

Broadway has been with the ADHE since January of this year. He is a member of Gov. Mike Beebe’s full cabinet as well as the Governor’s Workforce Cabinet, an appointed group of state government leaders charged with creating 21st-Century jobs and skilled workers.

Broadway’s primary responsibility is oversight of staff whose jobs are to carry out the policy directives of the Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board and to develop funding recommendations for the state’s 11 public universities and 22 public two-year colleges as well as several other post-secondary entities. In addition, the agency is responsible for distributing approximately $170 million annually from state revenues and lottery funds intended to ease the financial burden of students seeking an education beyond high school.

An Arkansas State University alumnus, Broadway served three terms as a representative for Pulaski and Saline Counties, and two terms in the senate. He was elected speaker of the House by his colleagues in 2001.

While serving in the General Assembly, Broadway was on the Education Committee every term except when he was speaker of the House. He previously was the chairman of the 15-state Southern Legislative Conference and chairman of the SLC’s Education Committee. Beebe appointed Broadway to the advisory board of the Southern Regional Education Board in 2007.

Broadway currently is president of the Saline County Economic Development Corporation Board of Directors. He and his wife Debbie Broadway were recipients of the 2001 Hope Award by the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Arkansas.

Degree Audit is an online advising tool that helps students find the best academic path to complete their degree.

You can log into Degree Audit through Campus Connect.

Using Degree Audit, a student can view degree and certificate requirements at SouthArk and track their completed coursework towards their chosen degree or certificate program.

It can also show students how their completed coursework could apply toward a different degree or certificate program.

Students with questions concerning the Degree Audit should speak with their Academic Advisor.

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Amanda Garcia of El Dorado has accepted the Medical Center of South Arkansas-BettyWhite Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College this fall.

She is a practical nursing major at SouthArk and a member of Phi Beta Lambda and Phi Theta Kappa at the college

Valena Galbraith, a 2000 graduate of El Dorado High School, has accepted a Pro MedAmbulance Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College this fall.

She is a surgical technology major.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

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At the Arkansas Association of Two-Year Colleges annual conference here last month, it was announced that the Career Pathways program at South Arkansas Community College will receive $30,302 in performance-based student-support funds.
The award was based on the program's meeting established goals for enrollment of students, completion of certificates and degrees and employment placement and retention.
Arkansas Department of Higher Education interim director Shane Broadway made the announcement and presented a plaque to commemorate the achievement to the Career Pathways staff.
The money will be used to provide additional direct benefits to students at SouthArk who qualify for the program.
Career Pathways is an initiative at all two-year colleges in Arkansas designed to help qualifying students reach their educational goals and become employed in their chosen fields. To qualify, students must be Arkansas residents and have children in their homes under the age of 21. They also must receive any one of a list of several different government welfareservices, or have an annual family income below 250 percent of federal poverty level (about $46,325 annually for a family of three). Benefits of the program can include limited tuition assistance, textbook assistance, gas vouchers, child-care assistance, laptop loaners, career counseling and assistance with career placement.
For more information, contact Angela Bacchus at (870) 864-8457 or Tammi McKinnon at (870) 864-8459.
 
PHOTO
Presenting a plaque to the South Arkansas Community College Career Pathways staff is, second from left, Arkansas Department of Higher Education interim director Shane Broadway. Receiving are SouthArk employees Kathy Reaves, Tammi McKinnon and Angela Kimsey Bachuss. Also pictured is SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones, far left.
 

ZUMBA TONING HOLIDAY MINI SERIES

Mondays,  November 21-December 12
6pm-6:45pm

$36/4 sessions.

*Supplies Needed:  Toning Sticks Required (Call 864-7192 for specific information about purchasing)

SouthArk Center for Workforce Development, 3698 East Main Room 121

Requirements: Pre-registration only

REGISTRATION DEADLINE:  November 14
Register at the SouthArk Bookstore or by calling 864-7163

When it comes to body sculpting, Zumba® Toning raises the bar (or rather, the toning stick). It combines targeted body-sculpting exercises and high-energy cardio work with Latin-infused Zumba® moves to create a calorie-torching, strength-training dance fitness-party. Students learn how to use lightweight, maraca-like Toning Sticks to enhance rhythm and tone all their target zones, including arms, abs and thighs. Zumba® Toning is the perfect way for enthusiasts to sculpt their bodies naturally while having a total blast!

Call 864-7192 or email ce@southark.edu for more information.

Valena Galbraith, a 2000 graduate of El Dorado High School, has accepted a Pro MedAmbulance Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College this fall.

She is a surgical technology major.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Parks_Dr._Jenniferinman_dean Dr. Jennifer Parks, the director of the physical therapist assistant program at South Arkansas Community College, has been elected the office ofpresident-elect of the board of the Arkansas Association of Two-Year Colleges.

The election was held at the organization’s annual conference here in October. Parks has been on the AATYC Board for four years. No representative from South Arkansas Community College has held the office of president-elect previously.

SouthArk dean of enrollment services Dean Inman also was elected to the 12-person board for the first time. SouthArk trustee Veronica Creer recently completed her tenure on the AATYC Board.

Dr. Barbara Jones, the president of the college, is the board’s sitting vice chair of presidents and chancellors.

“We are very proud to have two SouthArk employees to be elected to serve on theBoard of Directors for AATYC,” Jones said. “What an honor.”

PHOTOS

Parks, Inman

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Receiving the donated AEDs are, far left, SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones and far right, SouthArk emergency medical technology program director Ken Kelley. In the middle are Great Lakes Solutions representatives, from left, Frank DiCristina, Patty Cardin and Randy Evans.

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Great Lakes Solutions recently donated two automatic external defibrillators to South Arkansas Community College for use at the El Dorado Conference Center and at the Health Science Center, the college’s two newest facilities.

AEDs are technologically-advanced electronic devices that help restore the pumping action of the heart for victims of sudden cardiac arrest.

“We understand the importance of having equipment like AEDs assessable in areas of high traffic, like we have at SouthArk and the conference center,” plant manager Frank DiCristina said. “Great Lakes appreciates the opportunity to contribute to the college and community in this respect.”

On behalf of the college, SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones expressed gratitude for the donation, calling Great Lakes Solutions “One of our industry partners.”

“These safety devices are essential for these new facilities for students and visitors; however, we hope there is never a need for use,” she said.

The college already has two other AEDs in place, one at each of its El Dorado campuses.

PHOTO

Receiving the donated AEDs are, far left, SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones and far right, SouthArk emergency medical technology program director Ken Kelley. In the middle are Great Lakes Solutions representatives, from left, Frank DiCristina, Patty Cardin and Randy Evans.

More than 20 area writers will be featured in the upcoming annual volume of Between the Lines, the South Arkansas Community College literary magazine.
A panel of judges selected the works for publication. Writers from the college’s service area of Union, Ashley, Bradley and Chicot Counties as well as from Calhoun County and Union, Claiborne and Webster Parishes were eligible to submit.
A public reading by the writers will be held at 2 p.m. on Dec. 4 at the El Dorado Conference Center. Copies of the magazine will be available.
Writers featured in the publication this year are Ken Bridges, Gordon Byrd, CarolynDykes, Moriah Hicks, Marilyn Joyner, Chris Loggins, Cindy Mabry, Catherine Moran, Allan Pirnique, Jack Ryan, Janet Ryan, Shelby Spears and Heath Waldrop of El Dorado; Jim Barton of Huttig; Rebecca Freeman of Crossett; Gregory Jones and Brett Powell of Magnolia; Helen Pennington of Pine Bluff; Troy Lynn Pritt of Warren; Angela Schanzlin of Camden; Harding Stedler of Mayflower; Francis Bennett of Spearsville, La.; and Cynthia Sample of Dallas.
The Noon Symposium A Mirage of Democracy and an Illusion of a People: The Case of Cameroon, with Cameroon native Joseph Kwo, is set for Nov. 15 at South Arkansas Community College.
The guest speaker will discuss the political and socio-cultural landscape of his native country, specifically issues related to its 1960 independence from France and Great Britain.
Kwo has master’s degrees in diplomacy from Norwich University in Northfield, Vt., and French as a foreign language from the University of Buea (Cameroon). A multiple-award-winning educator, he recently relocated to south Arkansas from Houston. Held in Room 121 of the Center for Workforce Development at 3698 E. Main, the free event will begin with a light lunch at noon followed by the start of the program at 12:15 p.m.
Register by calling (870) 864-7192 or e-mailing ce@southark.edu.
Crossett’s Rebecca Freeman is among the more than 20 area writers to be featured in the upcoming annual volume of Between the Lines, the South Arkansas Community College literary magazine.
Freeman’s piece is titled “Shattered Innocence.”
A panel of judges selected the works for publication. Writers from the college’s service area of Union, Ashley, Bradley and Chicot Counties as well as from Calhoun County and Union, Claiborne and Webster Parishes were eligible to submit.
A public reading by the writers will be held at 2 p.m. on Dec. 4 at the El Dorado Conference Center. Copies of the magazine will be available.
In addition to Freeman, writers featured in the publication this year are Ken Bridges, Gordon Byrd, Carolyn Dykes, Moriah Hicks, Marilyn Joyner, Chris Loggins, Cindy Mabry, Catherine Moran, Allan Pirnique, Jack Ryan, Janet Ryan, Shelby Spears and Heath Waldrop of El Dorado; Jim Barton of Huttig; GregoryJones and Brett Powell of Magnolia; Helen Pennington of Pine Bluff; Troy Lynn Pritt of Warren; Angela Schanzlin of Camden; Harding Stedler of Mayflower; Francis Bennett of Spearsville, La.; and Cynthia Sample of Dallas.

southark-sipesHOT SPRINGS—Lisa Sipes of El Dorado, a radiologic technology major at South Arkansas Community College, was named an Academic All-Star here at the annual conference of the Arkansas Association of Two-Year Colleges earlier this month.

She along with the 21 other All-Stars was awarded two scholarships: one worth $500 to complete an associate’s degree and a second full-tuition scholarship to any of the 11 Arkansas public four-year universities or two of its private colleges to complete a bachelor’s degree.

“These scholarships will enable our best and brightest students to reach for their dreams at any of Arkansas’ 11 public four-year universities, and now two private universities,” said AATYC executive director Dr. Ed Franklin. “Many of these students are studying hard to maintain excellent grades while also working and handling family responsibilities, which makestheir accomplishments even more impressive. These students deserve our recognition, and these scholarships are a fine way to help them achieve their goals.”

Each of the 22 public two-year colleges names one student as an Academic All-Star. These students maintain cumulative grade-point averages of no less than 3.25 and have completed a minimum of 24 credit hours in pursuit of associate’s degrees.

 

PHOTO: SouthArk Academic All-Star Lisa Sipes, left, and SouthArk President Dr. Barbara Jones.

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CONWAY—Dr. Jennifer Parks, the director of the physical therapist assistant program at South Arkansas Community College, recently was recognized for more than 20 years of membership in the American Physical Therapy Association at the fall meeting of the Arkansas Physical Therapy Association at the University of Central Arkansas.

 

PHOTO: Parks.

Driver’s Permit Test Prep, a non-credit course at South Arkansas Community College, is designed to prepare students to take the written examination for Arkansas driving certification. The class is from 6 p.m to 8 p.m. on Nov. 8 and 15.

The instructors are Ronnie and Belinda Hall, owners of ArkLa Driving Academy who together have 65 years of experience in classroom teaching.

The class will be held at the Center for Workforce Development at 3698 E. Main on the East Campus. The cost is $29; students register at the SouthArk Bookstore or by calling (870) 864-7163.

Addison Preston, a 2011 graduate of Smackover High School, has accepted the SimmonsFirst Bank Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.

He is the son of Larry Preston and Diane Hamilton, both of Smackover. He was amember of the football and baseball teams and of the choir in high school.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Addison Preston, a 2011 graduate of Smackover High School, has accepted the SimmonsFirst Bank Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.

He is the son of Larry Preston and Diane Hamilton, both of Smackover. He was amember of the football and baseball teams and of the choir in high school.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

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The South Arkansas Community College Foundation has been awarded a $25,000 Sept. 11 National Day of Service and Remembrance 10th Anniversary Challenge grant from the Corporation for National andCommunity Service, a federal agency.

The award announcement comes following the unveiling of the Arkansas 9.11 Memorial as part of the SouthArk Foundation’s Outdoor Expo, held on Sept. 10.

The grant, funded over a three-year frame, will support the inclusion of an observance of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States as a permanent component of the Expo; the memorial as an educational destination for area citizens; and the organization of annual SouthArk service projects.

“I congratulate the SouthArk Foundation for its commitment to community service and its dedication that led to this award,” said Robert Velasco II, acting chief executive of the Corporation for National and Community Service. “It set a great example for the community, proving that the drive of a few can make a big difference for many.”

The Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act established Sept. 11 as a National Day of Service and Remembrance and authorized CNCS with supporting service and remembrance activities to honor this day. To promote broad participation in the day of service, CNCS launched the September 11 National Day of Service and Remembrance 10th Anniversary Challenge. Through this initiative, organizations were challenged to bring Americans together in service projects on and around Sept. 11.

Nearly 140 organizations participated in the Challenge, competing for grants that can be used over three years to implement future Sept. 11 projects on a larger scale to benefit their communities. Engaging more than150,000 total volunteers, grants were awarded to the organizations that were determined to have the largest numbers of volunteers in each of their respective categories.

The Foundation grant proposal noted that upwards of 2,000 volunteers are expected to help carry out the grant’s components.

The Corporation for National and Community Service includes agencies like AmeriCorps and Learn and Serve America.

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The South Arkansas Community College Foundation has been awarded a $25,000 Sept. 11 National Day of Service and Remembrance 10th Anniversary Challenge grant from the Corporation for National andCommunity Service, a federal agency.

The award announcement comes following the unveiling of the Arkansas 9.11 Memorial as part of the SouthArk Foundation’s Outdoor Expo, held on Sept. 10.

The grant, funded over a three-year frame, will support the inclusion of an observance of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States as a permanent component of the Expo; the memorial as an educational destination for area citizens; and the organization of annual SouthArk service projects.

“I congratulate the SouthArk Foundation for its commitment to community service and its dedication that led to this award,” said Robert Velasco II, acting chief executive of the Corporation for National and Community Service. “It set a great example for the community, proving that the drive of a few can make a big difference for many.”

The Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act established Sept. 11 as a National Day of Service and Remembrance and authorized CNCS with supporting service and remembrance activities to honor this day. To promote broad participation in the day of service, CNCS launched the September 11 National Day of Service and Remembrance 10th Anniversary Challenge. Through this initiative, organizations were challenged to bring Americans together in service projects on and around Sept. 11.

Nearly 140 organizations participated in the Challenge, competing for grants that can be used over three years to implement future Sept. 11 projects on a larger scale to benefit their communities. Engaging more than150,000 total volunteers, grants were awarded to the organizations that were determined to have the largest numbers of volunteers in each of their respective categories.

The Foundation grant proposal noted that upwards of 2,000 volunteers are expected to help carry out the grant’s components.

The Corporation for National and Community Service includes agencies like AmeriCorps and Learn and Serve America.

Jyran Dancy of Summerfield, La., a business major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted the William Jammillous Terry Scholarship to attend SouthArk this fall.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Jyran Dancy of Summerfield, La., a business major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted the William Jammillous Terry Scholarship to attend SouthArk this fall.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

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As the current economic recession continues and unemployment remains high, the issue of jobs is top on everyone’s list of concerns at a local, state and national level. Economic distress also has driven an ongoing enrollment surge at thenation’s community colleges—an increase of almost 17 percent nationally and an increase of 35 percent over the past five years at South Arkansas CommunityCollege.

Nationally, community colleges already educate almost half of all undergraduates. And they educate higher proportions of minority, low-income and adult learners—groups experts say will make up the bulk of our future workforce. SouthArk’s students reflect the population of the area counties with minority enrollment of more than 40 percent.

Hard economic times have brought new students to our campus. These deserving andsometimes desperate learners see education as the lifeline to a better future. State funding for community colleges throughout the nation has declined such thatdelivery of higher education has become more difficult as colleges provide to more with limited resources.

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has said that we must educate our way torecovery and he, like many business, policy and philanthropic leaders, seescommunity colleges as the affordable and workable solution to get more people ready for the workplace—now and into the future. Good-paying jobs do exist, but workers need the right skills. In a recent study, workplace expert Anthony Carnevale looked at worker trends over the next eight years and found that the majority of jobs in high-growth industries will require some training beyond high school. This is the kind of education community colleges excel in delivering—everything from nursing to welding to computer technology to business management.

Here at SouthArk, we are proud to offer almost 1,800 students the opportunity tosecure a quality education which will lead to high-wage, high-skills jobs or transfer to four-year universities. The college offers 14 health-care programs that,depending on the program, may be completed in only about two years, or evenless, depending of the program. Graduates of many of these programs earn wages that exceed $40,000 a year. Other programs are offered in the areas of computer technology, automotive service, cosmetology, process technology, welding, industrial equipment, business and accounting, which prepare students to work in business and industry. As a comprehensive community college, SouthArk also offers transferable general-education courses and degrees in teaching, criminal justice and liberal arts.

Research by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development indicates that the United States now ranks ninth out of 36 countries with only 42 percent of adults ages 24 to 34 having tertiary education. Arkansas ranks 50th among all states with only 26 percent with tertiary education. In fall of 2010, President Obama challenged all colleges and universities to double the number of students to complete degrees or certificates within the next decade. Gov. Mike Beebe has challenged the state colleges and universities as well. He noted that efforts to increase college completion “will improve our workforce readiness and increase economic-development opportunities for our state.”

We at SouthArk take these challenges seriously.

Despite the many challenges that face colleges, communities and students, SouthArk and other higher-education institutions are accepting President Obama’s and Gov. Beebe’s directives. Arkansas legislators have provided resources for academically-qualified students to attend college through the Arkansas Challenge Scholarship program. Murphy’s El Dorado Promise and many new community scholarship programs are providingresources for our students. Federal funding for Pell grants for needy students was approved for the coming year, although the future of this worthwhile program is uncertain. Around the country, college leaders, governing boards and college employees are signing pledges of commitment to meet the nation’s need to help more students enter and complete college.

Gov. Beebe joined with the SouthArk Board of Trustees, Student Government Association, faculty and staff in signing on to a campaign for college completion, “Go. Grow. Graduate.” Our pledge: “In recognition of the central role that South Arkansas Community College has in meeting the educational and training needs in our community and, more broadly, in contributing to an educated U.S. citizenry and a competitive workforce, we pledge to do our part to increase in the number of Americans with high-quality postsecondary degrees and certifications to fulfill critical local, state and national goals. With the “completion agenda” as a national and state imperative, SouthArk has an obligation to meet the challenge while holding firmly to traditional values of access, opportunity and quality.”

We ask you, our partners—K-through-12 institutions, community members, businesses and industries—to join us in this work to help students to succeed and help to build a stronger and more competitive workforce for Arkansas.

(Dr. Barbara Jones is the president of South Arkansas Community College.)

 

PHOTO: Student Government President Lisa Sipes signs her name to a pledge to support the completion agenda while, from left, Board Chair Steve Cousins, faculty representative Dr. Ken Bridges and college president Dr. Barbara Jones look on.

 

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Shaye Boykin, a biology student at South Arkansas Community College, reveals an aquatic invertebrate collected during sampling of the larger pond at the South Arkansas Arboretum last week. The biology students use the arboretum as a sort of “living laboratory,” according to instructor Matthew Connior, and are holding several classes there this month. The college manages the arboretum.

Autumn at the Arboretum is from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Oct. 23 at the South Arkansas Arboretum.

The event includes a pumpkin-pie contest as well as a scarecrow contest. Winners of the free-to-enter pie contest will receive ribbons. The scarecrow contest carries a $10 entry fee. Entries must be at least 4 feet tall and be presented at theArboretum between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. on Oct. 22. First prize is $50, second is $25 and third is $15.

collegenight2011
Union County College Night
Tuesday, Oct. 25, 6 to 8 p.m.
El Dorado Conference Center 311 S. West Ave.
High-school students, parents and others interested in college
and financial aid are encouraged to attend!
Plus...
Early-Bird Financial-Aid Seminar
5:30 p.m.
Institutions represented
* South Arkansas Community College * Arkansas State University * Arkansas Tech University * Central Baptist College
* Harding University * Henderson State University * Hendrix College * Louisiana State University-Shreveport
* Louisiana Tech University * Lyon College * Nashville Auto-Diesel College * Ouachita Baptist University
* Southern Arkansas University * Southern Arkansas University Tech * U.S. Army * U.S. Air Force * U.S. Marines
* U.S. National Guard * University of Arkansas * University of Arkansas-Fort Smith
* University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences * University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff * University of Arkansas-Little Rock
* University of Arkansas-Monticello * University of Central Arkansas * University of Arkansas Community College-Hope * University of Louisiana-Monroe * University of
seniorday2011
Senior Day
What’s it like to be a SouthArk student?
Maybe different than you think.
Tue. Nov. 8, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
For all area high-school seniors
El Dorado Conference Center 311 S. West Ave.
To register, contact Randy Jerry at
rjerry@southark.edu or log on to
www.southark.edu/seniorday

Officers for Phi Beta Lambda at South Arkansas Community College recently were elected.

The president is Anne Moses. Other officers are Vice President Andy Pulido, Secretary Jasmine Ferguson, Treasurer Lakeetra Candley, Director of Community Service Janice Shelton, Parliamentarian Bobby Freeman, Director of Communication Latifah Majied, Director of Hospitality Dylan Laster, Photographer Kelsey Webb, Director of Membership Jay Henard, Historian Callie Cain and Director of Fundraising Shquita Hicks.

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Representatives of the 71 programs overseen by the Adult Education Division of the ArkansasDepartment of Career Education, above, including Catherine Garrett of SouthArkansas Community College, met the week of Oct. 10-14 at the Capitol in Little Rock in honor of Adult Education Week in Arkansas. General Educational Development Pride Day was on Oct. 10.

 

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Members of the Student Government Association at South Arkansas Community College recently were installed by SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones. Front row, from left, Sen. Jyran Dancy, Treasurer Lakeetra Candley, Sen. Beth Moses, Sen. Ann Moses, President Lisa Sipes, Vice President Sara Smeltzer, Sen. Regan Carlton and Sen. Jazzilyn Curley. Back row, student services vice presidentDr. Curtis Hill, Jones and recruiting coordinator Randy Jerry.

 

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Arkansas Gov. Mike Beebe, center, meets with South Arkansas Community College president Dr. Barbara Jones, left, and SouthArk Student Government Association President Lisa Sipes on Sept. 22 concerning the state’s College Completion Agenda. SouthArk is implementing the agenda through an initiative called Go, Grow, Graduate, in which students sign a pledge to complete college with a degree or graduate certificate. Beebe added his signature, along with the signatures of SouthArk employees, to a pledge of support for the initiative.

 

southark-ptaNan Bowlin of Magnolia, right, a student in the physical therapist assistant program at South Arkansas Community College in El Dorado, demonstrates on SaraHisaw of El Dorado, a nursing student at the college, how to transfer a patient safely from a bed to a wheelchair by using the advantages of leverage. Eric Jermany of Magnolia, background, also a PTA student, looks on. The PTA students were giving this and other similar demonstrations for the nursing students on Monday.

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A total of 429 pounds of food was collected and donated to Interfaith Help Services as a result of the SouthArk Outdoor Expo on Sept. 10.

Visitors to the free event, which raises funds for the South Arkansas Community College Foundation, were encouraged to bring food for the donation.

“To honor those first responders who worked to save lives during the 9-11 attack, we chose to give back through community service and remembrance by collecting food donations at Expo,” Expo chair Greg Withrow said.

“We joined with others around the nation by volunteering and supporting a deserving charitable organization such as theInterfaith Help Services food pantry,” SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones said.

The pantry had been running low on inventory,Withrow said.

The Rev. Chuck Chapman of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in El Dorado, which houses the pantry, said that need in the area increased with the beginning of the economic downturn several years ago.

“Whereas once IHS could get by on the food donated in food drives from various churches and schools around town, it now must purchase much of what is given out from its food bank,” Chapman said. “The food donated through the Outdoor Expo will definitely help make a difference in IHS' ability to meet some of the needs of people in our area. South Arkansas Community College is to be thanked for thinking of its needy fellow citizens in this way, as are the people who attended the Expo and donated.”

PHOTO:

 

Interfaith Help Services Board members Bob Allen, front row, second from right; Mark Day, back row, second from right; and Lucy Bawel, front row, third from left; receive the food donation collectedthrough the SouthArk Outdoor Expo from SouthArk Foundation director CynthiaReyna, front row, between Bawel and Allen. Others pictured are event coordinators, from left, Laura Rogers, Greg Withrow, Lewis Whatley, Robin Carroll, Dean Inman and Dr. Barbara Jones.

joyner_davidDavid W. Joyner, a 1975 graduate of El Dorado High School, has accepted a Full-Time Choral Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

He is a general education major.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

joyner_davidDavid W. Joyner, a 1975 graduate of El Dorado High School, has accepted a Full-Time Choral Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

He is a general education major.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

southark-sim1What unfolded was a scenario that could have played out in a hospital just about anywhere.

“Doc…I’m having trouble breathing,” the voice spoke, and then a little more urgently, “I’m feeling very anxious.”

Multiple figures frocked in the attire of nurses scrambled around the bed to tend to the patient—checking vital signs, providing comforting words, consulting one another.

“Hurry up, please…I can’t breathe!” the voice implored.

As things began to appear bleak, suddenly the tension in the room broke with some chuckles among the attendants, who were told that they had missed a few important steps in dealing with the patient. And even though the he said that he could not breathe any easier, his attendants—actually nursing students at South Arkansas Community College—certainly could.

Because this scenario did not play out at a hospital, and this patient, with his robotic vocal tones and unchanging, agape expression, is not actually a human being. In fact, “he” is not even a living thing at all.

He, and several others like him at SouthArk’s Health Science Center, is a simulator, a life-sized and incredibly realistic teaching tool that can be programmed to replicate an infinite number of diseases, health emergencies and conditions.

In this case, the plastic-and-rubber sim man was supposed to be a patient with the lung affliction COPD—chronic obstructive pulmonary disease—and the students were instructed to tend to him in their first work with such a realistic simulation.

“We call it a ‘simulation’ because we’re simulating the real thing,” new SouthArk nursing director Keitha Davidson reminded her students. If they needed another reminder, they were given it by the sim man’s consistent nasal trickle, which required most of a box of facial tissue to keep at bay. That’s right: the sim also sometimes needs his nose cleared of “mucus” (actually a petroleum-jelly-like substitute).

southark-sim2The sims have computerized “brains,” and information for specific scenarios is uploaded into them via a laptop or other external device. This allows instructors to have control over the direction of the scenarios.

The nursing program at SouthArk has four human patient simulators. Besides the sim man, two of them are geared specifically toward checking vital signs and a third is capable of simulating birth.

“[She] actually can deliver the baby,” said SouthArk nursing instructor Tara Sadler. “I would have loved to have seen that when I was in school. I’ve been out of school a little while, and we just had plain dummies that didn’t do anything.”

Besides the “gee whiz” factor involved with the simulators, they provide incredible instructional opportunities, Davidson said.

“It allows [our students] to work in a non-threatening environment, because your patient is not real, but helps them to practice. But it also gives them a chance to experience things that they might not in a clinical setting,” Davidson said. “For instance, during their clinical internships they might never see a patient with COPD. They should be more proficient and comfortable when they work with a real patient because of this.”

Lorrie Rapp of El Dorado, a practical nursing major at SouthArk, said that workingwith the advanced technology has been helpful to her learning experience.

“They give you a lot of ‘normals’ so you’ll know what you’ll be seeing on a regular basis, and you’ll know the ‘abnormals’ when you see them,” she said.

southark-sim3She called the sims interesting and at times humorous.

“It’s kind of like a robot,” she said. “They say a lot of funny things, because you can make them say anything. The other day, one of them was saying ‘I feel like an elephant is sitting on me.’

“It really actually surprised me to see the technology that we do have right here, because a lot of colleges don’t have it.”

The simulators were paid for through a matching grant provided by the El Dorado-based SHARE Foundation.

Sadler said that having such technology puts SouthArk students ahead of the curve.

“I think that it’s going to be really good for them,” she said. “It sets SouthArk apart because our students have that experience.”

 

PHOTOS

 

Sim 1: SouthArk practical nursing student LaShunda White of El Dorado responds to the pleas of a patient simulator during lab work this week as Health-Science Professional Development Center project director Matthew Jeffers, background, enters commands into the sim. Jeffers is the coordinator of the SHARE Foundation matching grant received by the college last year that helped pay for the nursing skills lab, which includes the simulation technology.

 

Sim 2: SouthArk practical nursing students Lorrie Rapp of El Dorado, left, and Lori Simpson of Magnolia work with one of the simulators.

 

Sim 3: With numerous used tissues in front of him, a simulator is tended to by SouthArk practical nursing students Crystal Newton, left, and Pamela Muse.

Phi Beta Lambda at South Arkansas Community College is selling chicken spaghetti from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Oct. 21 to raise money for an annual PBL community service project.

Each lunch, which includes a roll and vegetable, is $6. Pre-paid orders also will receive dessert. Delivery is available on orders of eight or more.

To pre-order, call Donna Hendricks at (870) 862-8131.

Profits will benefit Turning Point of South Arkansas domestic-abuse crisis center.

southark-surg_tech

Officers were elected recently for the surgical technology Class of 2012 at South Arkansas Community College in El Dorado. These are President Shawana Boswell, center left, of Banks; Vice President John Miles, center right, of El Dorado; and Secretary Amy LeBlanc, far left, of Norphlet. With them from left are classmates Angela Schanzlin of Camden, Ashley Jenkins of El Dorado, Marion Evans of Urbana, Valeria Galbraith of Smackover, Sandra Cooper of Magnolia and Ashley Ford of El Dorado. Andrea Brown of El Dorado is not pictured.

Jyran Dancy of Summerfield, La., a business major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted the William Jammillous Terry Scholarship to attend SouthArk this fall.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Pizza and Defensive Driving for Teens is a four-hour crash course (not literally) in safe driving habits and attitudes for young drivers offered by South Arkansas Community College.

The class, which meets from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Oct. 4 at the SouthArk Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus, covers recognizing situations that result in wrecks and prevention of traffic violations. Some car insurance providers will reduce the rates of teens who complete the course. Pizza will be provided.

Teens who do not yet have drivers’ licenses may take the course, but they will not receive a National Safety Council certificate upon completion.

The class is $45. Students may register at the SouthArk Bookstore or by calling (870)864-7163.

A ceremony to induct new members into the National Technical Honor Society at South Arkansas Community College will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Sept. 25 at the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus of the college. A reception will follow.

EL DORADO, Ark.-Entrepreneur and published author Warren Brown, who left behind a career in law to start a bakery, will speak at 7 p.m. on Sept. 29 at the El Dorado Conference Center in the first event of the 2011-2012 South Arkansas Community College Lecture Series.
The speaking engagement, "CakeLove: Find Your Passion, Follow Your Calling" is open to the public and free to attend.
Brown's CakeLove chain of bakeries specializes in cakes made from scratch. His successes, which include having the two-time best bakery in Washington D.C. according to Washington Post reader surveys, led to a stint as host of "Sugar Rush" on Food Network.
Brown's two cookbooks, "CakeLove: How to Bake Cakes From Scratch" and "United Cakes of America," will be on sale that night at the SouthArk Bookstore, and Brown will be available to sign them during a reception immediately following the lecture.
The SouthArk Lecture Series will continue on Nov. 17 with actor Michael York's "From Shakespeare to Austin Powers: The Life of an Actor" and end on April 12, 2012, with Collins Tuohy's "Behind 'The Blind Side': Overcoming Obstacles in the Face of Adversity." These events are also open to the public and free of charge.
The Lecture Series was begun in 2006 as an educational program for the students, faculty and staff at South Arkansas Community College and as a community outreach project designed to bring to the campus and city recognized speakers.
brown_warrenEL DORADO, Ark.-Entrepreneur and published author Warren Brown, who left behind a career in law to start a bakery, will speak at 7 p.m. on Sept. 29 at the El Dorado Conference Center in the first event of the 2011-2012 South Arkansas Community College Lecture Series.
The speaking engagement, "CakeLove: Find Your Passion, Follow Your Calling" is open to the public and free to attend.
Brown's CakeLove chain of bakeries specializes in cakes made from scratch. His successes, which include having the two-time best bakery in Washington D.C. according to Washington Post reader surveys, led to a stint as host of "Sugar Rush" on Food Network.
Brown's two cookbooks, "CakeLove: How to Bake Cakes From Scratch" and "United Cakes of America," will be on sale that night at the SouthArk Bookstore, and Brown will be available to sign them during a reception immediately following the lecture.
The SouthArk Lecture Series will continue on Nov. 17 with actor Michael York's "From Shakespeare to Austin Powers: The Life of an Actor" and end on April 12, 2012, with Collins Tuohy's "Behind 'The Blind Side': Overcoming Obstacles in the Face of Adversity." These events are also open to the public and free of charge.
The Lecture Series was begun in 2006 as an educational program for the students, faculty and staff at South Arkansas Community College and as a community outreach project designed to bring to the campus and city recognized speakers.

A non-credit class in video production is scheduled for 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. every Tuesday on Sept. 27-Nov. 15 at the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus of South Arkansas Community College.

The introductory course is designed to teach the basic principles of video production for those who wish to develop videography skills for profit or just to make home videos look better.

The instructor is Chris Franklin, the owner of C&M Video Productions.

Cost is $89 and a video camera is required. Register at the SouthArk Bookstore or by calling (870) 864-7163.

Entries are being sought for the creative-writing contest that forms the basis of the South Arkansas Community College literary magazine Writers’ Ink.

The contest is open to all Union County high-school students, and 18 cash prizes will be awarded in three literary genres: poetry, essays and short fiction. First-place winners in each category in both a junior division (ninth and 10th grade) and senior division (11th and 12th grade) will receive $100, second-place winners $75 and third-place winners $50.

The winning manuscripts will be published in the spring in the 15th volume of the magazine with other entries selected by a panel of SouthArk judges. Student authors will receive free copies of the magazine and award certificates.

The deadline for submitting entries is February 17, 2012. Students who wish to enter should contact their English teachers for more information. Home-schooled students are invited to submit manuscripts by enlisting high-school English teachers in Union County to serve as their sponsors.

A complete set of contest rules, submission requirements and editorial guidelines are available on the college’s Web site at www.southark.edu/writersink, where students and teachers also can find creative-writing advice, topics and assignments.

The contest will culminate in the distribution of the new magazine and the cash prizes at the annual awards ceremony in April of next year.

EL DORADO, Ark.—Submissions are being sought for Between the Lines, the literary magazine of South ArkansasCommunity College.

Stories, poetry and essays submitted by writers 18 years and older who live in the college’s service area of Ashley, Bradley, Calhoun, Chicot and Union Counties, as well as Union, Claiborne and Webster Parishes in Louisiana, are encouraged to participate.
Manuscripts are due by Oct. 7 by e-mail to Scott Larkin at slarkin@southark.edu. A panel of judges will determine which works will be published; writers whosework is accepted will be notified and invited to participate in a public reading, and will receive two copies of Between the Lines.  

For more information, contactLarkin at slarkin@southark.edu, toll-free outside of El Dorado at 1-800-955-2289 extension 223, or locally at (870) 862-8131 extension 223.

shea_williamCivil War expert and published author Dr. Bill Shea will deliver the lecture “The Civil War We Have Lost: The Real War in Arkansas (1861-1865)” at 7 p.m. on Oct. 15 at the South Arkansas Community College Library Auditorium, a partnership effort between the college and the South Arkansas Historical Foundation.

The event, funded in part by a grant from the Arkansas Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities, is free and open to the public.

Shea, a history professor at the University of Arkansas-Monticello, has written or co-written five books on the topic of the Civil War in Arkansas.

Addison Preston, a 2011 graduate of Smackover High School, has accepted the SimmonsFirst Bank Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.

He is the son of Larry Preston and Diane Hamilton, both of Smackover. He was amember of the football and baseball teams and of the choir in high school.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

 

Lawrence Frierson, a 2011 graduate of El Dorado High School, has accepted the President’s Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College this fall.

Frierson is the son of Larraine Frierson of El Dorado.

 

southark-expo-cowboys1Among the many other attractions at this year’s free South Arkansas Community College Outdoor Expo, set for Sept. 10 at the El Dorado Conference Center, will be the Dallas Cowboys on Tour.

Two 18-wheel trucks allow fans to experience the NFL team remotely. The first truck is an interactive museum that houses numerous historic exhibits, including all five of the franchise’s Lombardi Trophies, life-sized mannequins of Cowboy Hall of Fame inductees Bob Lilly and Emmitt Smith and lockers of the team’s Super Bowl Most Valuable Players.

The second is a Dallas Cowboys Pro Shop with a selection of officially-licensedmerchandise and team apparel.

Also with the Cowboys set-up will be the 84-foot Dallas Cowboys Grilling Products booth. The full line of products for outdoor cooking on display will compliment the Expo’s Phil Herring Rib Cook-Off, which will award $1,000 to the first-place team. Deadline for entry is Monday (Aug. 29).

southark-expo-cowboys2The centerpiece of this year’s Outdoor Expo will be the noon unveiling of the Arkansas 9-11 Memorial, which features a 700-pound wrecked steel beam from Tower 1 of New York’s World Trade Center. Also, 2007 “American Idol” top-five finalist Phil Stacey will give a patriotic performance as U.S. military men and women will be honored. The Expo’s special guest will be Fish Fishburne, a professional angler who co-hosts “Ultimate Match Fishing” on the Outdoor Channel.

Additionally, a full spate of outdoors-themed booths and activities will be available.

For more information, see www.southark.edu/expo.

 

Architect’s three-dimensional rendering of the Arkansas 9-11 Memorial, which will be revealed to the public during the SouthArk Outdoor Expo in El Dorado on Sept. 10. The event will take place at the El Dorado Conference Center on the campus of South Arkansas Community College.EL DORADO, Ark.—The Arkansas 9-11 Memorial, which features a 700-pound wrecked steel beam from Tower 1 of New York’s World Trade Center, will be unveiled at the South Arkansas Community College Outdoor Expo at the El Dorado Conference Center on Sept. 10.

The Expo’s full day of activities is free to attend. The event is put on by the SouthArk Foundation.

On the weekend of the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, events at the Expo will pay homage to the nearly 3,000 who died and the memorial specifically will recognize the four Arkansans who perished. The I-beam is one of only a few hundred remnants of the Twin Towers donated by the New York Port Authority to points around the globe. It is the only one in the State of Arkansas and the only in a 250-mile radius from El Dorado. It took several years of filing paperwork and waiting before the application to receive the piece of history came to fruition.

Fish FishburneThe memorial will be situated permanently on the south grounds of the Conference Center, always available for public viewing. Architects have donated their time in designing the memorial and local businesses have donated material and labor in the construction.

Rescue personnel from around the state and region have been invited to participate in the ceremonies in recognition of the personal sacrifices made by men and women in that line of work in the aftermath of the attacks nearly a decade ago.

“SouthArk is proud to partner with the city, business and industry, and fire and police agencies to recognize our fallen friends and heroes through the dedication of the memorial,” SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones said.

Additionally, season six “American Idol” top-five finalist Phil Stacey will give a patriotic performance as U.S. military men and women will be honored.


The Expo’s special guest will be Fish Fishburne, a professional angler who co-hosts “Ultimate Match Fishing” on the Outdoor Channel. Fishburne is the former host of “ESPN’s BassMasters” and “ESPN Outdoors” as well as The Nashville Network’s “Go Fish.”

Fishburne will present a seminar on fishing with advice, casting techniques and giveaways.

Other Outdoor Expo attractions will include demonstrations of bladesmithing, rodeo roping and wood carving as well as displays of model airplanes, wildlife and others.

American Idol Finalist, Phil Stacey“We will offer more activities and demonstrations than we have in the past and we expect many out-of-town guests due to the dedication of the Arkansas 9-11 Memorial,” Foundation Board member Greg Withrow said. “It is important to the Foundation directors that we make this event informative, fun and educational for outdoor enthusiasts and the whole community while at the same time honoring those who tragically died on 9-11 and to those military personnel who have died for our country and those who continue to serve our country."

A canned and packaged food drive also will be held at the Expo; the items will be donated to Interfaith Help Services Food Bank in El Dorado.

Booth space is available for additional vendors and exhibitors; contact Cynthia Reyna at (870) 864-7106 or creyna@southark.edu.

The Expo again will feature the Phil Herring Rib Cook-Off, which will award $1,000 to the first-place team as well as other cash prizes. The entry fee is $50; the deadline is Aug. 29.

Also the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission will sponsor a duck-calling contest with a top prize of $200. The entry fee is $25 for adults, $5 for children and $40 for teams. For more information contact Laura Rogers at (870) 818-6378 or larogers@agfc.state.ar.us.

Making a return to the Expo this year is the outdoor photography contest. The best-of-show prize will be $100. Entries are $5 and winners will be selected in four categories: people in the outdoors, flora, scenes and wildlife.

For more information about this event, see www.southark.edu/expo. Proceeds from the SouthArk Outdoor Expo fund in part college scholarships through the SouthArk Foundation.

“The SouthArk Outdoor Expo is a wonderful community and college event that raises much-needed funds for student scholarships,” Jones said. “It is through the support of local individuals, businesses and industries, local and state agencies, cookers from throughout the state, our employees and community volunteers that this event has grown to be so successful.”

Architect’s three-dimensional rendering of the Arkansas 9-11 Memorial, which will be revealed to the public during the SouthArk Outdoor Expo in El Dorado on Sept. 10. The event will take place at the El Dorado Conference Center on the campus of South Arkansas Community College.

zumbathon_page
Dress in purple, come out to Zubma and support the American Cancer Society and Relay for Life!  A minimum donation of $10 is requested to participate.  Free bottled water is available at the registration table.  Door prize drawings will be held every 30 minutes.
Saturday, August 20, 2011
South Arkansas Community College Gymnasium
300 South West Avenue
El Dorado, AR 71730
10:00 a.m. until noon
For mor information, contact:
Brenda Knight at 870-918-96443, brenda.knight@cancer.org
Nikol Major at 501-609-5855, nikolfitness@yahoo.com
southark-tetra
David Gasper of Tetra Technologies in El Dorado, second from left, this week presents a check that represents a $7,000 donation by the company to the South Arkansas Community College Foundation in support of SouthArk’s new process technology program. Receiving are, from left, dean of business and technical education Jim Roomsburg, dean of workforce development Lynda Richardson and president Dr.Barbara Jones. Developed due to local industry need, the program will trainstudents to operate systems at chemical plants, refineries, paper mills andother such sites. Students are being enrolled now; for more information about the process technology program call Roomsburg at (870) 864-8410.
southark-tetra

David Gasper of Tetra Technologies in El Dorado, second from left, this week presents a check that represents a $7,000 donation by the company to the South Arkansas Community College Foundation in support of SouthArk’s new process technology program. Receiving are, from left, dean of business and technical education Jim Roomsburg, dean of workforce development Lynda Richardson and president Dr.Barbara Jones. Developed due to local industry need, the program will trainstudents to operate systems at chemical plants, refineries, paper mills andother such sites. Students are being enrolled now; for more information about the process technology program call Roomsburg at (870) 864-8410.

David Gasper of Tetra Technologies in El Dorado, second from left, this week presents a check that represents a $7,000 donation by the company to the South Arkansas Community College Foundation in support of SouthArk’s new process technology program. Receiving are, from left, dean of business and technical education Jim Roomsburg, dean of workforce development Lynda Richardson and president Dr.Barbara Jones. Developed due to local industry need, the program will trainstudents to operate systems at chemical plants, refineries, paper mills andother such sites. Students are being enrolled now; for more information about the process technology program call Roomsburg at (870) 864-8410.

DEARBORN, Mich.—Nick Matthews and Francisco Echavarria, representing South Arkansas Community College, placed 12th in the the Ford-AAA National Automotive Skills Competition here last month.

The team received the national bid by winning the same competition at the state level. It marked the first time that a team from SouthArk had won the state championship.

At the national finals,teams from all 50 states competed on a 100-question written exam and a timed skills event in which they had to identify glitches and repair 14 deliberately installed “bugs” in identical 2011 Ford F-150 XLT trucks. The bugs ranged from a “no-start” situation to a broken horn and hood latch.

A team from Oregon won the competition. Teams from Hawaii, Minnesota, Kansas, Arizona, Alabama, Wisconsin, Louisiana, California and Michigan rounded out the top 10.

A pool of nearly 10,000junior and senior high school automotive technology students began the National competition process with an online exam in March that entitled them to compete in the state competition. Only one team from each state could go on to the national finals.

“With such stiff competition, it is a real testimony to the determined, skillful work of Karsten Tidwell and Doyle Manis, instructors in the automotive service program, to have a SouthArk team place in the top 15 teams in the country,” said Dr. Larry Moser, the director of SouthArk’s Secondary Technical Center.

PHOTO: At the national competition, from left, Francisco Echavarria, Nick Matthews and instructor Karsten Tidwell.

 

 

Dr. Jamie Brandon, research station archeologist for the Arkansas Archeological Survey, will lead a non-credit introductory course in archeology from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Aug. 2, 9, 16 and 23 in Room 138 of the South Arkansas Community College Center for Workforce Development at 3698 E. Main.

The class is $39. Register at the SouthArk Bookstore, (870) 864-7163.

Alma E. Moses, the daughter of Noah and Melanie Moses of El Dorado, has accepted the Choral Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.

She is a member of Phi Beta Lambda at SouthArk, Union County 4-H, South Arkansas Poets of the Pines andother.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Photo: Alma Moses

Elise A. Moses, the daughter of Noah and Melanie Moses of El Dorado, has accepted the Choral Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.

She is a member of Phi Beta Lambda at SouthArk, Union County 4-H, South Arkansas Poets of the Pines andother organizations.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Alma E. Moses, the daughter of Noah and Melanie Moses of El Dorado, has accepted the Choral Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.

She is a member of Phi Beta Lambda at SouthArk, Union County 4-H, South Arkansas Poets of the Pines andother.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Elise A. Moses, the daughter of Noah and Melanie Moses of El Dorado, has accepted the Choral Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.

She is a member of Phi Beta Lambda at SouthArk, Union County 4-H, South Arkansas Poets of the Pines andother organizations.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Elise A. Moses, the daughter of Noah and Melanie Moses of El Dorado, has accepted the Choral Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.

She is a member of Phi Beta Lambda at SouthArk, Union County 4-H, South Arkansas Poets of the Pines andother organizations.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Lisa Sipes of El Dorado, a 1984 graduate of Norphlet High School, has accepted the REACH Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

She is a radiologic technology major and a member of Phi Beta Lambda, president of the Student Government Association, a member of Phi Theta Kappa and president of the 2012 rad tech class.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

York_jamesJames P. York, a 1999 homeschool graduate, has accepted the Jodie Mahony Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

York is a general-education major at SouthArk and received the English Award in 2011.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Jay Henard, a 1986 graduate of McKray High School in Mount Holly, has accepted the James M. Moore Jr. Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.
Henard is a nursing major and a member of Phi Theta Kappa and Phi Beta Lambda.
henard_jayJay Henard, a 1986 graduate of McKray High School in Mount Holly, has accepted the James M. Moore Jr. Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.
Henard is a nursing major and a member of Phi Theta Kappa and Phi Beta Lambda.
EL DORADO-Tammy Caskey of Magnolia, a physical therapist assistance major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted the JoAn and Charles T. Skinner Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.
She is a member of Phi Theta Kappa.
The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.
caskey_tammyEL DORADO-Tammy Caskey of Magnolia, a physical therapist assistance major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted the JoAn and Charles T. Skinner Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.
She is a member of Phi Theta Kappa.
The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

LaTisha M. Briggs, a 2011 graduate of El Dorado High School, has accepted the Jonathan M. Warren Memorial Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

The daughter of Arthur and Sherry Briggs, in high school she was a member of Family, Consumer and Career Leaders of America; Future Business Leaders of America; the Fellowship of Christian Athletes; the Spanish Club; and Thespian Troupe 42.

teasley_PorshaPorsha Teasley, a 1997 graduate of Smackover High School, has accepted the James Family Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

ndent:14.4pt'>The daughter of Sherry Briggs, in high school she was a member of Family, Consumer and Career Leaders of America; Future Business Leaders of America; the Fellowship of Christian Athletes; the Spanish Club; and Thespian Troupe 42.

 

greenBecky Green, a 2011 graduate of Smackover High School, has accepted the Dr. Ben T. Whitfield Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

Green, the daughter of Sandra Green, was the secretary-treasurer of the Health Occupations Students of America at Smackover High.

hletes; the Spanish Club; and Thespian Troupe 42.

 

Jamie Wolfe, a 2000 graduate of Warren High School, has accepted the Melba Tatom Nursing Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

Charles Jones Jr., a 1995 graduate of El Dorado High School and a general education major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted the General Scholarship to attend SouthArk in the Fall.

He is a member of Phi Beta Lambda, Phi Theta Kappa and the Stand Foundation.

Kara Yutzy of El Dorado has accepted the General Educational Development Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

Inez Robinson, a 1998 graduate of Strong High School, has accepted the Omazel Lawson Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

Lisa Sipes of El Dorado, a 1984 graduate of Norphlet High School, has accepted the REACH Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.
She is a radiologic technology major and a member of Phi Beta Lambda, president of the Student Government Association, a member of Phi Theta Kappa and president of the 2012 rad tech class.
The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.
Lisa Sipes of El Dorado, a 1984 graduate of Norphlet High School, has accepted the REACH Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.
She is a radiologic technology major and a member of Phi Beta Lambda, president of the Student Government Association, a member of Phi Theta Kappa and president of the 2012 rad tech class.
The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.
James P. York, a 1999 homeschool graduate, has accepted the Jodie Mahony Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.
York is a general-education major at SouthArk and received the English Award in 2011.
The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.
James P. York, a 1999 homeschool graduate, has accepted the Jodie Mahony Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.
York is a general-education major at SouthArk and received the English Award in 2011.
The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.
Jay Henard, a 1986 graduate of McKray High School in Mount Holly, has accepted the James M. Moore Jr. Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.
Henard is a nursing major and a member of Phi Theta Kappa and Phi Beta Lambda.
henard_jayJay Henard, a 1986 graduate of McKray High School in Mount Holly, has accepted the James M. Moore Jr. Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.
Henard is a nursing major and a member of Phi Theta Kappa and Phi Beta Lambda.
EL DORADO-Tammy Caskey of Magnolia, a physical therapist assistance major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted the JoAn and Charles T. Skinner Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.
She is a member of Phi Theta Kappa.
The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.
caskey_tammyEL DORADO-Tammy Caskey of Magnolia, a physical therapist assistance major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted the JoAn and Charles T. Skinner Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.
She is a member of Phi Theta Kappa.
The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

LaTisha M. Briggs, a 2011 graduate of El Dorado High School, has accepted the Jonathan M. Warren Memorial Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

The daughter of Sherry Briggs, in high school she was a member of Family, Consumer and Career Leaders of America; Future Business Leaders of America; the Fellowship of Christian Athletes; the Spanish Club; and Thespian Troupe 42.

of Phi Beta Lambda, Phi Theta Kappa and the Stand Foundation.

teasley_PorshaPorsha Teasley, a 1997 graduate of Smackover High School, has accepted the James Family Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

greenBecky Green, a 2011 graduate of Smackover High School, has accepted the Dr. Ben T. Whitfield Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

Green, the daughter of Sandra Green, was the secretary-treasurer of the Health Occupations Students of America at Smackover High.

Jamie Wolfe, a 2000 graduate of Warren High School, has accepted the Melba Tatom Nursing Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

Charles Jones Jr., a 1995 graduate of El Dorado High School and a general education major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted the General Scholarship to attend SouthArk in the Fall.

He is a member of Phi Beta Lambda, Phi Theta Kappa and the Stand Foundation.

Kara Yutzy of El Dorado has accepted the General Educational Development Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

Inez Robinson, a 1998 graduate of Strong High School, has accepted the Omazel Lawson Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

Non-credit classes for children at South Arkansas Community College’s East Campus Center for Workforce Development through this month include music, foreign language and cooking studies.

These courses are intended for children ages 6 through 12.

Science Camp is from 8 to noon on July 18-21 with instructor Marta Langston; cost is $49.

Kids in the Kitchen is from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. on July 18-21 with instructor Bobbie Smith; cost is $39.

Spanish for Kids is 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on July 18-21 with instructor Osman Latino; cost is $39.

Math Camp is from 8 to noon on July 25-28 with instructor Marta Langston; cost is $49.

Babysitters Club is from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. on July 25-28 with instructor Sherrin Tucker; cost is $39.

Guitar for Kids is from 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on July 25-28 with instructor Latino; cost is $39.

Children may be dropped off from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m. and picked up from 4:30 p.m. to5:15 p.m. Children registered for a full day of classes may bring their ownlunches; lunches will be supervised from 12 p.m. to 12:30 p.m.

For more information call (870) 864-7192 or e-mail ce@southark.edu.

southark-UB
PHOTO: Students in South Arkansas Community College’s Upward Bound program wrap strips of fabric around a dead squirrel body on Thursday morning in one step of the mummification process.

Students in South Arkansas Community College’s Upward Bound program preserved a memory on Thursday by mummifying squirrel corpses.

Comprised of local high-school students, the group has been studying mummification throughout the month of June under lab-science instructor Jeff Ulmer, who credited SouthArk science instructor Linda Bates for the idea.

Bates has been using the ancient technique on squirrels for several years after receiving a grant for African studies to implement in a school laboratory setting.

With mummification, “I decided that I could mix chemistry, art and history,” she said.

The Upward Bound students not only learned the preservation technique but also created clay canopic jars—used to hold the soon-to-be-mummified body’s organs after removal—ornamented with Egyptian artwork.

The students began by dressing the squirrels with a dense, dry salt rub, which Ulmer said was an even mixture of table salt, baking soda and an ancient compound called natron. Then they wrapped the bodies in strips of cotton fabric—the mummy dressing with which most people probably are familiar. After the cloth was secured, they added a liberal dose of essential oils to the wrapped bodies. The final step was to place the squirrels into plastic bags and pack even more of the salt mixture around them.

It is in this condition that they must rest for 40 to 60 days, Bates said…maybe not as impressive as a golden sarcophagus, but still effective. The salt will pull moisture from the small bodies and in September when the wraps are removed, a fully-preserved squirrel body will be revealed.

Upward Bound director Debra Mock said that she will put the little mummified corpses on shelves in the program’s new space in the SouthArk Computer Technology Building.

The students—ninth graders through recent high-school grads—were not at all disgusted by working with the tiny dead bodies, even though the process requires handing entrails. They wore surgical gloves and protective gear.

“It’s so exciting that they’re really into it,” Bates said, observing. “Nobody’s really been able to master what the Egyptians did. This is just a small window into it.”

hammett_kalan

Kalan Hammett, a 2011 graduate of Junction City High School, has accepted the President’s Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the Fall.

The daughter of Joe Paul and Connie Hammett of Junction City, in high school she was captain of the cheerleading squad and president of the Student Council. She also was a member of Future Business Leaders of America; Family, Career andCommunity Leaders of America; the Spanish Club; the yearbook staff; the Character Council; and Who’s Who at JCHS.

Dr. Ben Johnson, a history professor at Southern Arkansas University in Magnolia, will present Did You Remember Our Anniversary? History, Memory and Celebration, July’s Noon Symposium at South Arkansas Community College. The program will be held on July 13 in Room 121 of the SouthArk Center for Workforce Development at 3698 E. Main. A light lunch will be served.

Johnson, a former professor at SouthArk, said that determining history’s most important developments sometimes come down to whether throwing a party in memory of the occasion can be justified.

The last day to withdraw from any class during the First Summer semester will be Wednesday June 29th at 4:00 p.m. All drop forms must be completed by that time.

EL DORADO—South Arkansas Community College has announced its Dean’s List for the Spring semester.


Arkadelphia: Joshua Doherty.


Banks: Alysha Robinson and Ashley Royer.


Bearden: Lindsey Elmore, Deedre Pierce and Candice Welch.


Bryant: Joseph Ross.


CalionL Amanda Parker.


Camden: Barbara Brown, Krista Davis, Pamela Dunegan, Alexi Forbes, Mattie Jefferson, Lasandra Malone, Christa Pipkin, Keturah Rumph, Gerald Stinnett, Devin Tate and Melina Tucker.


Crossett: Lauren Brantley, Richard Carter, Chelsea Ferrell and Gayla Williams.


El Dorado: Alison Alderson, Charla Alderson, Chad Amason, Donna Barnes, Susan Barnett, Samira Bearden, Johnetta Biddle, Micha Boone, Siesha Boyette, Tina Braswell, Megan Bridges, Jonathan Brown, Sharita Cain, Shanna Calloway, Ambrosia Caruso, Andrew Casculescu-Luca, Jerry Childs, Karrah Clark, James Cogdell, Amanda Copes, Caitlyn Copes, Ticia Cox, Steven Craig, Jazzilyn Curley, Shemika Dade, Roopa Dadlani, Leslie Dalzell, Brittany Davis, Ravon Dismuke, Samuel Dixon, Daniel Dyck, Melanie Dyson, Benjamin Endel, Johnathan Estes, Debra Faulkner, Matthew Flemens, Larry Fogle, Cynthia Garner, Kristin Gentry, Dana George, Jill Goodwin, Wesley Hargett, Josephine Harris, Kacie Hayes, Kimberly Hayes, Jay Henard, Justin Hurst, Lashunda Jackson, Valorie Jacobson, Kyra Jerry, Mark Jeter, Angelina Jones, Charles Jones, Donald Jones, Sheila Jones, Sherry Justus, Donna Karch, Ashley King, Kristen Latino, Michelle Lein, Brittany Lewis, Christopher Martindale, Justin McAlphin, Celes Miller, Dequita Miller, Rachel Miller, Joshua Misenheimer, Rodney Mitchell Jr., Rachell Montgomery, Sharhonda Moody, Tyana Moody, Bonnie Moore, William Morgan, Yolanda Morris, Christina Navarrete, Rebecca Neal, Amy New, Crystal Newton, David Nix, Traci Owen, Jessica Patterson, Francisca Pedraza, Heaven Pittman, Sandra Prewett, Stormey Primm, Amanda Qualls, Lorrie Rapp, Jessica Rice, Shelby Rickford, Elena Riley, Tina Rivas, Angela Roberson, Clay Robinson, Mildred Robles, Ashley Rodriguez, Madison Romine, Britteny Ruff, Hannah Senn, Jeanne Shew, Angela Smith, Bradley Smith, Chazney Smith, Latonya Smith, Lynea Smith, Samantha Spears, Shamekia Stanley, Moe'Echay Tandy, Kaitlin Tucker, Cassandra Vaughn, Lashunda White, Lois White, Ryan White, Shirley White, Tasha Wilson, Joshua Wise, Julie Wong and Bridget Wood.


Emerson: Crystal Anglin and Randi Johnston.


Fordyce: Peggy Mathews and Joshua Tatum.


Hamburg: Jaci Allison, Jacob Jeffers and Betsy Skender.


Hampton: Erin Carpenter, Keri Shankles, Brynn Stanchfield and Haley Stith.


Hermitage: Brandi Ashcraft, Nathaniel Harrod and Patricia Temple.


Hope: Vanessa Bobo, Cassaundra Mosier, Lindsey Rose and Kayla Whatley.


Huttig: John Gilmore, James Pill and Shannon Rogers.


Junction City: Dana Bibby, Cassandra Buford, Calley Burroughs, Sonja Cole, Quaneisha Davis, Claudia Hux, Brandy Mendoza, Lindsey Thurman, Kasie Tolbert, Meagan Toms and Taylor Ward.


Lawson: Melissa McMurrian.


Louann: Linda Hodges and Chelsea Parker.


Magnolia: Kathaleana Aden, Cheryl Babb, Cortney Burdine, Johnie Caldwell, Tammy Caskey, Tonya Christopher, Patricia Daniel, Courtney Goble, Lajuana Hamilton, Eric Jermany, Steven Jetton, Laci Long, Amy May, Drew Moore, Pamela Muse, Clair Roden, Ahna Rogers and Ashley Thornton.


Monticello: Lisa Flemister, Ishshah Molina, Ashley Thomas and Lillian Thompson.


New Edinburg: Shelia Currier.


Norphlet: Leslie Dees, Michelle Gorman and Martha Olvera.


Prescott: Jazmine Franklin.


Smackover: Kevin Arrington, Richard Barnes, Steven Edney, Sonia Ferrington, Nikisha Faulkner, William Pullin, Porsha Teasley and Alaina Watson.


Stamps: Misty Harbour


Stephens: Marilyn Hayes, Patricia McCollum, Lori Simpson, Blair Thomas and Danika Torrence.


Strong: Barbara Brodnax, Debbie Head, Ramona McHenry, Inez Robinson and Shana Welch.


Taylor: Emy Butler, Kayla Dodson, Lauren Jennings and Kelli Waggonner.


Waldo: Kacie Robichaux.


Warren: Emily Burt, Amy Evans, Elizabeth Gonzalez, Debra Henderson, Jonderik Hubbard, Kanesha Palmer, Barbara Ragland, Amy Sims, Whitney Williams and Jamie Wolfe.


Wilmar: Cynthia Stanley and Melanie Williams.


Bastrop, La.: Angel Coates.


Bernice, La.: Allison Matherne.


Downsville, La.: Ginger Barkley.


Farmerville, La: Kylie Garris, Abbie Moon, Alison North, Keri Price and Kelci Rodgers.


Haynesville, La.: Shaterra Millage, Andrew Tushner, Kristen Tushner and Lillie Angela Barron.


Marion, La.: Treneika Fields and Steven Thurston.


Monroe, La.: Amy Farris and Carla Hughes.


Ruston, La.: Ashlie Gray and Danielle Jones.


Spearsville, La.: Randall Banks, Adam Kennedy, Paul Manning, Jose Reyes and Shaledra Wayne.


West Monroe, La.: Patti Jones.

amb-carlton amb-ferguson amb-curleyjazz amb-willisjeremy

Four new Student Ambassadors have been named for the 2011-2012 academic year at South Arkansas Community College.

Regan Carlton of Magnolia, a 2011 graduate of Columbia Christian School in Magnolia, is the daughter of Wayne and Robin Carlton of Magnolia. In high school she was a member of the Student Council, choir and Youth Advisory Council, as well as the volleyball, basketball and softball teams. She was a homecoming maid and the softball team’s most valuable player.

Jasmine Ferguson, a 2011 graduate of El Dorado High School, is the daughter of Terry and Balinda Johnson of El Dorado. In high school she was a member of the Steering Committee, Future Business Leaders of America, the marching band and SouthArk’s Upward Bound chapter.

Jazzilyn Curley is a 2001 graduate of El Dorado High School and a general business administration major at SouthArk. She is a member of Phi Beta Lambda.

Jeremy Willis, a 2009 graduate of Smackover High School, is the son of James and Crystal Willis of El Dorado.
 
PHOTOS: Regan Carlton, Ferguson, Curley and Jeremy Willis

The last day to withdraw from any class during the First Summer semester will be Wednesday June 29th at 4:00 p.m. All drop forms must be completed by that time.

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The SouthArk Foundation set up an information booth at the South Arkansas Community College first annual Spring Fling in April.  This event was hosted by the SouthArk Student Government Association for students to participate in fun games, enjoy a hot dog lunch, and win prizes and giveaways.   L-R: Foundation student worker Jazz Curley and Institutional Advancement and Foundation director Cynthia Reyna.

demingcFor the first time, commencement exercises at South Arkansas Community College will be held at the college-operated El Dorado Conference Center.
SouthArk’s spring commencement exercises will be held at 7 p.m. on Friday with 189 graduates and guest speaker Claiborne P. Deming.
Deming was president and chief executive officer of Murphy Oil Corporation from October 1, 1994, to December 31, 2008. Prior to assuming that position, he was executive vice president and chief operating officer and had been president of Murphy Oil USA, a major operating subsidiary.
He joined Murphy in 1979 as staff attorney and held numerous positions prior to his promotion to president of Murphy Oil USA in June 1989.
Deming is a 1976 cum laude graduate of Tulane University with a bachelor’s degree and a 1979 graduate of Tulane with a doctor’s degree.
He is a member of the Board of Directors of Murphy Oil Corporation and chairman of the Executive Committee. In addition he was on the Board of Directors of the Entergy Corporation in 2002-‘06.
He was a member of the Arkansas State Board of Education in 1999-2002.
Deming is a former president of the 25-Year Club of the Oil and Gas Industry and a former treasurer of the American Petroleum Institute, and currently is the chairman of the National Petroleum Council.
Deming is a member of the Vanderbilt University Board of Trust and of the University of Virginia Jefferson Scholars Foundation Board of Directors.
 
Photo: Deming

demingcFor the first time, commencement exercises at South Arkansas Community College will be held at the college-operated  ELDorado Conference Center.


SouthArk’s spring commencement exercises will be held at 7 p.m. on Friday with 189 graduates and guest speaker Claiborne P. Deming.


Deming was president and chief executive officer of Murphy Oil Corporation from October 1, 1994, to December 31, 2008. Prior to assuming that position, he was executive vice president and chief operating officer and had been president of Murphy Oil USA, a major operating subsidiary.

 


Deming is a 1976 cum laude graduate of Tulane University with a bachelor’s degree and a 1979 graduate of Tulane with a doctor’s degree.


He is a member of the Board of Directors of Murphy Oil Corporation and chairman of the Executive Committee. In addition he was on the Board of Directors of the Entergy Corporation in 2002-‘06.


He was a member of the Arkansas State Board of Education in 1999-2002.


Deming is a former president of the 25-Year Club of the Oil and Gas Industry and a former treasurer of the American Petroleum Institute, and currently is the chairman of the National Petroleum Council.


Deming is a member of the Vanderbilt University Board of Trust and of the University of Virginia Jefferson Scholars Foundation Board of Directors.

He joined Murphy in 1979 as staff attorney and held numerous positions prior to his promotion to president of Murphy Oil USA in June 1989.

LITTLE ROCK—Twelve South Arkansas Community College students qualified for national competition in the 2011 Arkansas Phi Beta Lambda Spring Leadership Conference here recently.
The Sigma Epsilon Chapter as a whole received recognition as an Arkansas Gold Chapter and as the largest local chapter at the Associate Level. The chapter also was recognized as the second-largest in the Professional Division and took second place in chapter theme scrapbooks.
Additionally, SouthArk’s Traci Owen was named the Arkansas PBL Member of the Year.
The chapter also won the Arkansas Sweepstakes for one- and two-year colleges. Individual first-place finishers among the many entries from the chapter were Jazzilyn Curley (administrative services), Justin McAlphin (computerized accounting), Janice Shelton (client service, Bobby Freeman (computer concepts, word processing) and April Goble (word processing).  
Indiviudal second-place finishers were Goble (machine transportation), Shelton (medical transportation), Owen (local chapter annual business report), Lauren Jennings (computer applications), Lisa Sipes (cyber security), Jordan Hanson (justice administration), LaDawn Henry (project management) and Noah Moses (telecommunications).  The team of Dexter Lawrence and Moses finished second in network design.
Individual third-place finishers were Shelton (machine transportation), Lawrence (cyber security), Pamela Hilliard (impromptu speaking), Marla Benson (management concepts), Marilyn Hayes (database design and applications) and Owen (statistical analysis). The team of Benson and Owen finished third in desktop publishing.
Individual fourth-place finishers were Hilliard (administrative services), Hansen (client service), Henry (information management) and McAlphin (statistical analysis). The team of Freeman, Owen and Lisa finished fourth in community service projects.
Knox White was named the Business Person of the Year and Michael Roberts additionally received  Outstanding Local Chapter Adviser recognition.
In addition Curley, Henry, Hilliard, McAlphin, Moses, Owen, Sherry Briggs, Jessica Murry, LaSandra Malone and Samantha Turner were noted for reaching the Executive Level of the Career and Membership Achievement Program.
Hilliard also was recognized as Who’s Who in PBL.
The PBL 2011 National Leadership Conference is set for June 23-26 in Orlando, Fla.

southark-upwardbothWhen Jermaine Thurston and Erin Malone entered the South Arkansas Community College Upward Bound program as ninth graders four years ago, in the program’s inaugural year, neither one really knew what to expect. And by their own admissions, neither was just blown away at first.
But at some point over that span, the light went off for these two El Dorado High School seniors, and now they attribute Upward Bound—a federal academic program that provides advising, tutoring and cultural enrichment—for contributing greatly to their social and scholastic successes.
And there have been many. Malone and Thurston are two of the most impressive young people that you ever could meet. Despite the inherent challenges that they have faced coming from single-parent households where college was not a part of family history, they both have college and professional goals set squarely in their sights.
Malone, for instance, already has 15 college credits to her name and before beginning classes in the fall, expects to have 27—by hours she’ll be nearly a sophomore before she’s a traditional freshman. She’s a member of the National Honor Society, Beta Club, Junior Service League, EHS Student Council and Young Democrats, among many other organizations. She also has been awarded six college scholarships.
“I look back, and I wouldn’t have been as involved without Upward Bound,” Malone said.
Thurston has joined the U.S. Army and will begin basic training later this month. He was the EHS Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps battalion commander and the marching band drum major.
He said that he easily could have broken to a different and less-positive direction if not for the influence of Upward Bound, which he said “helps you find and build on potential.”

southark-upwardmaloneBesides the achievements that can be listed on a resume, Malone and Thurston communicate with the polish and confidence not often seen in adults a decade older. They are articulate, engaging and self-aware.
It wasn’t always this way, Malone said. She decided to run for president of the local Upward Bound chapter, an office that she won despite not being what she would deem a natural fit for the role. With the leadership position she also inherited certain obligations.
“I was really shy,” Malone said. “I had to give a speech before about a thousand people. After I kept doing it, I broke away from my shyness.
“Upward Bound is one of the most motivational parts of my life and I don’t think that I would be where I am now if it wasn’t for Upward Bound,” Malone said.
SouthArk Upward Bound director Debra Mock said that Malone has excelled by making the most out of her inherent abilities.
“With some students, things come easily. It didn’t come to her naturally,” Mock said. “She had to work, work, work.”
But from early on, the director said, Malone showed desire.
“If I’m not mistaken, Erin Malone was the first student to pick up an application in 2007. Her ambition was evident from the very first,” Mock said. “She was already goal-oriented. Upward Bound gave her direction.”
Before being in Upward Bound, despite having good grades, Malone and some others in the program never had taken pre-Advanced Placement classes in school—considered these days to be the primary college-bound track.
“The comment was ‘I don’t think we’re supposed to sign up for those kinds of classes,’” Mock recalled. “They were used to reaching the ceiling of the basement and being satisfied with that.”
However, Mock and the other coordinators of SouthArk’s program were not satisfied with that. They saw more potential.
“We pushed them and showed them how, and they took advantage of it,” Mock said. “We can help them be successful, which is the whole idea of the program.”
Malone entered Advanced Placement U.S. History, and “It was life-changing for her. She was out of her realm,” Mock said.
Malone said that the class was the most challenging and difficult single experience of her life. But with personal determination and help from Upward Bound tutoring, she passed the class.
“Erin will tell you, once she got through that, there is nothing that she’ll ever take in a college classroom that she can’t handle,” Mock said.
Though it began at SouthArk in 2007 with Malone and Thurston’s group, “The program’s been around since Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty” according to Mock. The experience of Upward Bound is designed to be academically-rigorous, with 18 weeks of Saturday meetings throughout the school year, six weeks of summertime work that simulates the college experience and a so-named bridge program for immediate graduates that is designed to link high school and college.
“This program is a college prep program, and it does prepare you for college,” Malone said. “We come on Saturdays and we’re actually working. We’re taking trips, but we’re not just playing around.
“And besides being educational, it gives you something to do.”
Through Upward Bound, Thurston, Malone and their classmates visited more than 30 different college campuses over four years. The visits helped cement for Malone that she wants a career in a business field, she said.
“We fully expect that Erin will take all the skills she learned in the Upward Bound program into a future of leadership that will benefit the greater community,” Mock said. “It’s not just your academics...it’s your involvement.
“I tell them [all] that they have to give back. Because this college and this community have given to them.”

southark-upwardthurstonThurston said that the program has “opened windows of opportunity” for him, particularly with respect to working with others—which has come in handy in his leadership roles in high school. He freely offered that he has come a long way in his journey toward adulthood.
“He was sort of drifting as a ninth grader,” Mock said. “The Upward Bound staff recognized that Jermaine was at a crossroads and struggling to find his place. Jermaine came to tutoring several times a week and [was] offered tough advising and positive redirection.”
That “redirection” worked wonders from Thurston, who eventually was selected as the program’s Outstanding Student of the Year.
“Steady, confident, a role model for his younger brothers and peers, and a source of pride for his mom and those who know him, Jermaine is on the right path,” Mock said. “We look forward to seeing the impact he will have on the lives of other young men struggling to find their way.”
Thurston’s desire is to enter the field of aviation, either as a pilot or a technician, utilizing skills that he hopes to learn in the Army. This has been a goal of his for some time, he said, and Upward Bound gave him the confidence that he needed to pursue it.
“You have to have a passion for what you do,” he said.
Another component of the program is exposure to cultural events. Malone never even had been out of the state, other than a handful of brief trips to Texas to see family, before joining Upward Bound. She and some others from the SouthArk chapter flew to Washington to experience the inauguration of President Barack Obama in 2009—her first trip on an airplane. Through Upward Bound Malone said that she also had her first experience of an extended stay with people whom she did not know well—people with different ethnic and cultural backgrounds from her own.
“It was so different. It kind of pushed you out of your comfort zone a little bit,” she said. “I loved it.”
It’s important to note, Malone said, that the students in Upward Bound cannot all be painted with the same brush. While many of them are considered “at-risk,” and most come from economic hardship, they have different motives for entering the program.
“There are 50 kids in Upward Bound and not all of them have the same story I have,” she said.
Nearly all of them, though, will be first-generation college students come fall. That’s the case with both Thurston and Malone.
“I really like Upward Bound. I’m sad that I am going to have to leave,” Malone said.
She won’t be away from the program entirely. As part of the federal grant that funds Upward Bound at SouthArk, coordinators must follow the students for two years after they graduate the program, keeping tabs on their progress.
“We’re like parents of a huge family. We’re ready for them to go, but we have mixed emotions,” Mock said. “We have certainly bonded with these students. We are indeed very proud.”
 
PHOTOS
 
Upward Both: Erin Malone, left, and Jermaine Thurston, soon-to-be graduates of Upward Bound at South Arkansas Community College, attribute the academic program for doing great things in their lives.
 
Upward Malone: Malone, right, with U.S. Sen. Mark Pryor of Arkansas.
 
Upward Thurston: Thurston adorned with leadership insignias of JROTC at El Dorado High.

southark-process3Leaders from six major area industries on Thursday were given an informational update on the recently-approved process technology program at South Arkansas Community College in El Dorado.  The degree program is designed to train refinery operators, chemical operators and process technicians. These operators control and monitor the systems that run industrial plants.    Operators gather information using instrumentation and lab equipment to maintain safe work areas and keep plants in compliance with regulatory requirements. They work both indoors and outdoors alongside engineers, chemists and other professionals. 

Operators use knowledge of computers, math, physics and chemistry to keep industrial plants running safely and efficiently. They require strong communications skills—the ability to write, express views orally and listen—in order to succeed at their jobs.  Currently, process operators from the Baby Boom generation are reaching retirement age and regional industry is facing the prospect of having to replace a substantial portion of this workforce within the next decade. A recent survey of local companies revealed a shortage of operators and starting pay that averaged about $17 an hour.

southark-process2It all adds up to a collective vested interest of the area’s industrial companies, as well as individuals who are seeking good employment opportunities, in the new SouthArk program—which will begin in the fall—according to SouthArk Vice President of Learning Dr. Val Cantu.  Calling the process technology program at SouthArk “industry-driven,” Cantu told the industry leaders “We certainly need your feedback and support.” 

The Arkansas Department of Higher Education at its spring quarterly meeting last month approved both an associate’s degree (two-year track) and a technical certificate (one-year track) in process technology at SouthArk.  “We’re the only two-year school in Arkansas that has this program,” Cantu said.  SouthArk administrators said that the equipment used in the program also could be utilized by the area’s industries to update the training of their existing employees.  Attending the meeting, held at the new El Dorado Conference Center on the campus of SouthArk, were Cathie Hillier of Georgia-Pacific Crossett Paper Operations, Donald Kuhlmann of USA DuPont, Paul Fisher of Lion Oil, David Gasper of Tetra, Greg Withrow of El Dorado Chemical and Frank DiCristina of Great Lakes Solutions.  SouthArk’s four-county service area is made up of Union, Bradley, Chicot and Ashley Counties.
 
PHOTOS
 
Photo 1: Frank DiCristina of Great Lakes Solutions discusses the possible benefits of the new SouthArk process technology program for area industry, as others listen in the background.
 
Photo 2: Industry leaders listen as Dean of Continuing Education Lynda Richardson, standing left, addresses the crowd about the new process technology program at the college.

baumgardner

Psychology instructor Sterling Claypoole and natural-science instructor Susan Johnson recently were named recipients of the G. Thomas Baumgardner Students’ Choice Faculty Award at South Arkansas Community College.

Both Claypoole and Johnson are newcomers to the full-time faculty at SouthArk. The award is designed to recognize teachers who have been the most helpful and supportive in the eyes of students, and winners receive $500 for use in classroom development activities.

Baumgardner, a long-time resident of El Dorado, retired from his full-time job at Con-Agra Foods in 1992 but taught classes at the college in 1981-‘95. He also was a board member for the college as well as a for the South Arkansas Regional Health Center, Campfire Girls, the South Arkansas Arts Center, the Union County Community Foundation, the El Dorado Airport Commission, the El Dorado Civil Service Commission, YWCA.and the El Dorado Little Theater.  
The award was established by Dr. Kermit Parks for the SouthArk Foundation.
 
PHOTO: Baumgardner, center, with Claypoole, far left, and Johnson.

HOT SPRINGS—A group of 21 students from South Arkansas Community College recently brought awards home from the Arkansas SkillsUSA Championships.

In secondary auto service, Daniel Hernandez placed third, Nick Matthews placed fourth, Shawn Utley placed eighth, Nick Morris placed ninth and Francisco Eschavarria placed 10th. In post-secondary auto service, Melina Tucker placed fourth and Richard Barnes placed 10th.

In secondary criminal justice, the team of Patrena Blake, James Lewis and Kassidy Meshell placed fourth.

In post-secondary cosmetology, Sunnie Sweeny placed 10th.

In secondary pipe welding, Jordan Coleman placed second and Justin Rankin placed seventh.

In post secondary structural welding, Jose Wise placed 10th.

baumgardner

Psychology instructor Sterling Claypoole and natural-science instructor Susan Johnson recently were named recipients of the G. Thomas Baumgardner Students’ Choice Faculty Award at South Arkansas Community College.

Both Claypoole and Johnson are newcomers to the full-time faculty at SouthArk. The award is designed to recognize teachers who have been the most helpful and supportive in the eyes of students, and winners receive $500 for use in classroom development activities.

Baumgardner, a long-time resident of El Dorado, retired from his full-time job at Con-Agra Foods in 1992 but taught classes at the college in 1981-‘95. He also was a board member for the college as well as a for the South Arkansas Regional Health Center, Campfire Girls, the South Arkansas Arts Center, the Union County Community Foundation, the El Dorado Airport Commission, the El Dorado Civil Service Commission, YWCA.and the El Dorado Little Theater.  
The award was established by Dr. Kermit Parks for the SouthArk Foundation.
 
PHOTO: Baumgardner, center, with Claypoole, far left, and Johnson.

baumgardner

Psychology instructor Sterling Claypoole and natural-science instructor Susan Johnson recently were named recipients of the G. Thomas Baumgardner Students’ Choice Faculty Award at South Arkansas Community College.

Both Claypoole and Johnson are newcomers to the full-time faculty at SouthArk. The award is designed to recognize teachers who have been the most helpful and supportive in the eyes of students, and winners receive $500 for use in classroom development activities.

Baumgardner, a long-time resident of El Dorado, retired from his full-time job at Con-Agra Foods in 1992 but taught classes at the college in 1981-‘95. He also was a board member for the college as well as a for the South Arkansas Regional Health Center, Campfire Girls, the South Arkansas Arts Center, the Union County Community Foundation, the El Dorado Airport Commission, the El Dorado Civil Service Commission, YWCA.and the El Dorado Little Theater.  
The award was established by Dr. Kermit Parks for the SouthArk Foundation.
 
PHOTO: Baumgardner, center, with Claypoole, far left, and Johnson.