southark-voelkerSouth Arkansas Community College will hold Fall Commencement at 7 p.m. on Thursday at the El Dorado Conference Center.

The guest speaker will be Dr. Donald Voelker, an interventional cardiologist at the Medical Center of South Arkansas in El Dorado.

Voelker, an extensively-published and frequent-invited faculty lecturer at national and international conferences, has been at MCSA since late 2005. He brought a complete cardiovascular heart team with him in the effort to create a state-of-the-art heart surgery program at the hospital.

Board certified in interventional cardiology, cardiovascular disease and cardiac computed tomography, Voelker is an adjunct clinical professor of medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock.

He is a founding member of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and in 2010 was recognized as one of only 77 physicians in the world designated as a Fellow by the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

At MCSA Voelker is the director of the cardiac catheterization laboratory and of business development; co-director of cardiac computed tomography services; and medical director of cardiovascular rehabilitation services.

He is a member of the American Heart Association, where he is a member of the Council on Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology and of the Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention.

South Arkansas Community College president Dr. Barbara Jones, seated left, and Southern Arkansas University president Dr. David Rankin, seated right, while other administrators of the institutions look on, sign transfer agreements between the two colleges recently. One agreement is for transferring into the SAU criminal-justice bachelor's-degree program after completing an associate's degree in criminal justice at SouthArk, and the other is for transferring into the SAU psychology bachelor's-degree program after completing an associate's degree in liberal arts at SouthArk.

Commencement for fall 2013 South Arkansas Community College general educational development graduates is at 2 p.m. on Dec. 12 in Room 121 of the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus.

Recently inducted into the Phi Theta Kappa honor society chapter at South Arkansas Community College were:

From El Dorado, Tonya Dawn Arnold, Megan Alesandra Bryant, Stephanie Juanyell Carter, Terron Lecole Daniels, Dana Jenetta George, Jimmie Dell Jerry, Jennifer Nicole Miletello, Monica Latrice Phifer, Yvonne Ashley Roberts-Norwood, Amanda Renee Shults, Shelby Marie Smith, Tyler Javon Steward and Kimberly Ann Tucker.

From Camden, Kimberly Michelle Bunn and Timothy Lawrence Lowe.

From Magnolia, Sha'kendra La'Shay Easter, Tiara Shanay McCray, Megan Louise Shehane and Cynthia V. Walker.

From Junction City, Lillian Shea Green.

From Bearden, Angela D. Humphries.

From Waldo, Matthew Howard Langheld.

From Warren, Callie Michelle Simmons.

From Fordyce, Kaitlyn Elizabeth West.

From Downsville, La., Callie DeAnn Powell.

The Alpha Gamma Iota Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, the honor society for two-year colleges, will hold its member induction ceremony at 6 p.m. on Friday (Nov. 15) at the El Dorado Conference Center.

jerry-mathersClassic TV legend Jerry Mathers, who played Theodore "Beaver" Cleaver on "Leave It to Beaver," will speak at the El Dorado Conference Center at 7 p.m. on Nov. 21, part of the eighth annual South Arkansas Community College Lecture Series.  The event is free and open to the public.

"The Golden Age of Television and Media Trends Today" will include behind-the-scenes stories about "Leave It to Beaver" and other projects as well as Mathers' thoughts on current trends in TV. 

Born in 1948, Mathers began his show-business career at the age of 2 in a PET Condensed Milk commercial on "The Colgate Comedy Hour." He continued in minor roles as a child actor throughout the dawn of television and made his movie debut in 1954 in "This Is My Love." He went on to co-star in Alfred Hitchock's "The Trouble With Harry" and "The Seven Little Foys" with Bob Hope, among several other film roles throughout the mid 1950s.  Mathers reached a higher level of stardom upon being cast as the Beaver in 1957.

"Leave It to Beaver" is one of the most beloved TV series of all time and often is used as a perfect example of 1950s Americana. Even though its original broadcast run ended in 1963, the half-hour comedy hardly ever has been off of the small screen since; on its 50th anniversary it was noted as the longest-running scripted show in TV history.  It also crosses cultural lines well enough that it has been shown in more than 80 countries and translated into 40 languages.

Nostalgia for the era led to a revival with "The New Leave It to Beaver" in 1984, featuring Mathers and most of the original cast. The series aired until 1989. Mathers directed some episodes.  "Leave It to Beaver" charted on Time magazine's "100 Best TV Shows of All-Time"; Mathers himself was named as one of the most well-known individuals in TV history by People magazine.

In addition to speaking dates, Mathers still does some acting, including TV, film and stage roles.  In 2007 he debuted on Broadway in "Hairspray," portraying Wilbur Turnblad. 

A type-2 diabetic, Mathers often is a spokesperson for diabetes awareness, even addressing the U.S. Congress on the topic.  Mathers' talk will be followed by a question-and-answer session and a reception. 

For additional information about the Lecture Series, call (870) 864-7156.

Advanced Directives and Living Wills, a seminar conducted by Life Touch Hospice through South Arkansas Community College, is 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Nov. 7 at the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus, and 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Nov. 12 at Life Touch at 2301 Champagnolle Road.

The seminar will cover end-of-life decisions and how to communicate them with family and friends.

It is free and open to the public. More information is available at ce@southark.edu.

Introduction to Excel is a non-credit course from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Nov. 11-12 at the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus of South Arkansas Community College.

The class covers basic Excel functions. Students may bring laptops.

The fee is $30. Register at the SouthArk Bookstore, (870) 864-7163.

Jennifer Miletello, an accounting major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted a Langston Endowed Scholarship to attend the school this semester.
She is a 2000 graduate of Parkers Chapel High School and a member of Phi Beta Lambda.
The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Amy Moore of Warren, a nursing major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted a REACH Scholarship to attend the school this fall.

She is a 1988 graduate of Benton High School.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Lewis Whatley of El Dorado, a 1983 graduate of Norphlet High School, has accepted a Lucy Ring Academic Excellence Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College this fall.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Elizabeth Beaudoin-Fogle, a registered-nursing major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted an Alpha Xi Scholarship to attend the college this fall.

She is a 2000 graduate of MacArthur High School in Lawton, Okla.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Kimberly Bunn, a surgical technology major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted a Mable and Emon Mahony Endowed Scholarship to attend the college this fall.

She is a 1991 graduate of Camden High School.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

LaTanya Hegler, a 2001 graduate of Warren High School, has accepted an Omazel Lawson Endowed Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College this fall.
The scholarship is funded through he SouthArk Foundation.

The Union County Single-Parent Scholarship Fund Board of Directors recently selected scholarship recipients for the fall 2013 semester. A total of 36 awards were given.
The number and amount of scholarships awarded each semester depends on the funds available. Funds are received from various sources including the Arkansas Single-Parent Scholarship Fund, local donors and others.


Scholarships were awarded to South Arkansas Community College students Jeanie Baker, Tracy Barnhart, Rosalin Broadnax, Camillian Brown, Markesha Brown, Solita Jones Brown, Cavorcia Carter, Christie Choate, Amanda Daniels, Allison Dolden, Nicole Edmerson, Ashley Ford, Latosha Gatson, Aretha Glaspie, LaTanya Glaspie, Jessica Hagood, Gerald Hall, Lativia Hall, Adriana Villegas Izucar, Shelia Jones, Veronica LeFear, Briana Malone, Freda Mason, Carmen Marales, KaShekia Miller, Shawana Miller, Katherine McElveen, Memory Parker, Brittany Reynolds, Inez Robinson, Cortney Sherman, Kinetra Swift, Romona Tolbert and Chimorrika Williams.


Scholarships were awarded to Southern Arkansas University students Courtney Caver and Tamara Wells.


To be eligible, students must live in Union County, be enrolled in any college or university and be a single parent providing support of a dependent child or children under the age of 18 in the household.


For more information about donating to the scholarship fund or applying for a scholarship, contact the financial aid office at South Arkansas Community College at (870) 864-7150. Deadline for the spring semester is Feb. 1, 2014.

Amy K. Fugate of Rison has accepted a General Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

gatson latoshaLaTosha Gatson, an accounting major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted a Robert R. Brown Jr. Scholarship to attend the school this fall.

At SouthArk she is a member of Phi Beta Lambda and Phi Theta Kappa.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Nikisha Faulkner has accepted a REACH Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College this fall.

She is a 1993 graduate of Mount Holly High School.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Dawn Tucker, an early-childhood education major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted a Mabel Stratton Powell Endowed Scholarship to attend the school this fall.

She is a 2004 graduate of Maranatha Christian School.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Kimberly Tucker, an administrative assistant technology major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted an Island Memorial Scholarship to attend the school this fall.

She is a 2007 graduate of Maranatha Baptist Christian School.

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation

southark-kidd-lea On a summer day in 2012 Madison Kidd was on a basketball court, looking forward to a senior year filled with the usual highs of homecoming, prom night and graduation, and beyond, a possible future as a college hoops player.
Then a sudden, "excruciating" abdominal pain doubled her over, and in an instant her life was changed forever.
The doctor's diagnosis: Crohn's disease, an illness that severely inflames the gastrointestinal tract and has no known cure or cause.
"You feel like your whole stomach is being stabbed," Kidd, now a student at South Arkansas Community College, said. The accompanying internal hemorrhaging is very frightening to experience, she said. When her condition was at its worst throughout her senior year, she would feel these pains 20 to 25 times a day, lose blood, seize in agony.
Yet the first thing that she uttered after being diagnosed with this lifelong illness was "Will I still be able to play?"
"Able" is a subjective word. Nobody would have expected it, and many probably wouldn't have suggested it, but play she did. As a result Kidd—described by her nurses as "tough as nails"—is being given the USA Today Inspiration Award, presented by the Army National Guard, back in her old high school gymnasium in Spring Hill on Wednesday. Each year the honor is bestowed on 14 high-school athletes nationwide who have overcome adversity to compete in their chosen sport.
To get to this point, the former Lady Bear center had to jump through more hoops than the team scored in its 30-2 season in 2012-2013. She said that she didn't want to miss out on contributing to what ended up being a landmark year.
"We were the best that ever came through Spring Hill," Kidd said.
So she fought through the pain, steadied herself against the weakness and played basketball to the best of her ability. It was anything but easy, according to her former basketball coach.
"Madison lost a lot of weight and was sick more than not," Laura Kidd said. (The two are not immediate family relatives.) "She went from a strong, healthy post player to a frail girl."
She missed 11 games and many weeks of school, but went to class and participated in practices as often as possible. She finished her senior year with a 4.0 grade-point average, often doing homework while waiting on treatment, or even during it. She made games even if that meant taking treatment in a basketball uniform so that she would be ready in time.
"I was in and out of hospitals, and as soon as I got out, I would be on the court playing ball," Madison Kidd said. "When I was playing, I'd have to play in spurts. I was weak the whole season, but I'd push through it."
Her team got a psychological lift whenever Madison made it to games, Laura Kidd said.
"Many games, Madison would come straight to a game after a treatment, running to the floor before tip off," she said. "It was like a weight was lifted when we all saw her! We knew she was OK if only for a short time.
"When Madison couldn't be with her team, we prayed for her and were reminded to be thankful for our blessing and work hard for those who weren't fortunate enough to be able to participate."
In one game she had to sit on the bench, too weak to play, wearing a medical mask to limit her weakened immune system to possible infection.
"She still supported her team," her coach said. "Madison has not only overcome physical and emotional obstacles related to her illness, she also was strong-willed enough to keep her team focused."
In another situation, coach Kidd felt that she had to relegate her center to the bench after she had taken a painful hit to the abdomen while experiencing a flare up. The player had wanted to continue.
"I couldn't bear the thought of her getting hit again, so I didn't play her much," Laura Kidd said. "She would play at any cost, if she thought her presence on the floor would help her team succeed."
As if the illness itself wasn't hard enough, Madison Kidd also battled difficult side effects that included powerful allergic reactions to steroid treatment. She went from being dramatically underweight to bloated with severe acne.
"I've had a reaction to everything I've taken," she said. "I felt ugly, I would cry. I was very emotional."
Thankfully, she said, the worst of her condition has subsided, at least for now. At one point Madison Kidd was taking 21 pills a day. Now she has treatment only monthly, for four or five hours at a time, at Arkansas Children's Hospital in Little Rock. But unless medical science finds a cure she will, for the rest of her life, face the possibility of that familiar, agonizing pain.
"I hate to see her in pain and trying to adjust her life for this terrible illness. She continues to stay positive with all she endures," Laura Kidd said. "Rarely will you see her without a smile."
As a result of the disease, Madison Kidd had to give up her dream of playing college basketball, because as she put it, "God had other ideas."
She entered SouthArk in the fall, moving to El Dorado from her hometown in the Hope area, with thoughts of becoming a physical therapist assistant, taking the notion after a younger cousin required physical therapy.
"I wanted to help people like her," the student said. "I think that I'll be good at it because I can show patients that things get better.
"I love the school and I'm very happy with my decision."
Her old coach called her "a coach's dream," lauding her leadership and the example that she set for others. She said that she is unsurprised that her former player chose to pursue a degree field in which helping others is the central effort.
"Madison will, no doubt, be successful in all aspects of her life. She expects greatness in herself and others," Laura Kidd said. "I consider myself blessed to be part of her life and will always be proud of Madison. What an amazing young lady!"

PHOTOS

Madison Kidd outside of the Health Science Center at South Arkansas Community College. The physical therapist assistant program is what drew her to the El Dorado college from her hometown of Spring Hill.

South Arkansas Community College will recognize National Manufacturing Day on Oct. 4 with a career fair, open to the public, from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus.


Hosted in partnership with the South Arkansas Workforce Training and Education Consortium, the El Dorado Chamber of Commerce and the South Arkansas Human Resource Association, the fair will have representatives from area manufacturing companies on hand to discuss job opportunities. The event also includes training equipment demonstrations, technical-program tours and resume reviews.


For more information, email dean Jamie McConathy at jmcconathy@southark.edu.

southark-fooddonation

About 360 pounds of food, collected at the recent SouthArk Outdoor Expo, are donated to Centro San Martin Food Bank recently by members of the SouthArk Foundation Board of Directors.

comejo selene aSelente A. Comejo, a 2013 graduate of El Dorado High School, has accepted the Living the Dream Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College this fall.

She is the daughter of Elena Puentes of El Dorado. 

The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

martinez taniaTania Martinez, an accounting major at South Arkansas Community College, has accepted a Living the Dream Scholarship to attend the school this fall.  She is a 2011 graduate of Smackover High School and the daughter of Eliseo Martinez and Eva Martinez, both of Smackover.  The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

Manny Espinosa, a 2013 graduate of Norphlet High School, has accepted a Living the Dream Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College this fall.
He is the son of Alfonso and Veronica Espinosa of El Dorado.  The scholarship is funded through the SouthArk Foundation.

The impact of South Arkansas Community College's $3.9-million portion of the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Grant announced last week by the U.S. Department of Labor will be far-reaching, according to officials with the school.
The South West Arkansas Community College Consortium, made up of seven community colleges including SouthArk, learned that it would receive funding of nearly $8.5 million over the next three years. SouthArk will have the lead role in administering the grant for the consortium.
The grant proposal noted that southwest Arkansas is among the poorest regions of the country, where opportunities for workforce training are in great need.
"This proposal seeks to ignite the untapped potential of the region's employers to widen postsecondary access channels and drive even more postsecondary educational attainment," the proposal stated.
It went on to say that with the rise of more technology-driven occupations, a "skill gap" has developed in the manufacturing sector, preventing many long-time workers from transitioning into these because yesterday's training is no longer adequate. The grant is intended to help close that gap through a focus on science, technology, engineering and math fields.
It will fund equipment, supplies, professional training and consultation, and about 10 new positions at SouthArk alone. As the lead college, SouthArk will be responsible for establishing the overall procedures for grant implementation, defining outcomes, assuring fiscal accountability and establishing an evaluation and reporting system.
The local college will update and expand its welding program, further enhance its process technology program and add a mechatronics program. Mechatronics combines the technologies of electronics and mechanical engineering.
Instruction offered will range from non-credit industry-specific training to associate's-degree programs. The associate's degree in process technology also will transfer into a bachelor's-degree program at Southern Arkansas University.
"This [grant] is good news for the college, students' wanting to study manufacturing and our local manufacturing companies," SouthArk technical education dean Jim Roomsburg said. "This gets the college into STEM education in a major way."
Following one of the consortium's strategic missions, the grant is designed to re-imagine community-college relationships with area industries, creating partnerships that allow both entities to succeed for the ultimate benefit of the local workforce. That means more and better educational opportunities for students in cutting-edge technology fields, and better-trained and more highly-skilled employees, according to college administrators.
The consortium's members worked closely with area industries to discover precisely what education and skills that their employees need in today's manufacturing world, and will need in tomorrow's. That will be an ongoing task throughout the grant's lifetime, according to SouthArk president Dr. Barbara Jones.
"SouthArk will work with employers in south Arkansas to revise, improve, or develop curriculum to prepare graduates," Jones said.
The timing of the grant was outstanding, Jones said, as there will be a need for about 700 new manufacturing-industry workers in the area in the coming years, according to figures provided by the El Dorado Chamber of Commerce.
"The receipt of these funds is timely with the pending expansion of El Dorado Chemical, Clean Harbors and other area industries; impending retirements; and the challenge of recruiting a skilled workforce to our rural region," she said. "These are high-skill, high-demand and high-wage positions that are much needed by the industries."
The intent also is to be flexible in the way that instruction is delivered, as previous methods often do not meet the needs of the current landscape. For example, a major priority is to award college credit for previous work experience, as an encouragement to current workers to complete certifications and degrees via a faster track.
"For South Arkansas Community College, this grant will provide the much-needed resources to train a skilled workforce for the chemical, petroleum and pulp and paper industries in our region," Jones said. "We are so grateful for this opportunity and look forward to working with the employers, stakeholders and educational institutions in our region to build a stronger workforce for Arkansas."
College administrators are expecting about 370 new students a year in the grant-funded programs across the seven colleges in the consortium. The other colleges are Southern Arkansas University Tech in East Camden, the University of Arkansas Community College-Hope, Cossatot Community College of the University of Arkansas in DeQueen, Rich Mountain Community College in Mena, College of the Ouachitas in Malvern and National Park Community College in Hot Springs.

The Phi Beta Lambda chapter at South Arkansas Community College will hold a car wash from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on June 1 in front of the Whitfield Building on the West Campus. The cost is $5 with larger donations accepted. Money raised will help fund a trip by qualifying PBL members to compete at the PBL National Leadership Conference in Anaheim, Calif., on June 21. More information is available by contacting Donna Hendricks at dhendricks@southark.edu or Michael Roberts at (870) 864-7157.
South Arkansas Community College president Dr. Barbara Jones, seated left, and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences South Center director Dr. Mike Fitts, seated right, recently sign an agreement for an educational partnership between the two schools. Looking on are UAMS recruiter Debbie McAdams, standing left, and SouthArk career coach Tim Johnson. The agreement will allow UAMS to deliver its nursing master's degree program through distance learning at the University Center on the SouthArk campus. McAdams will help advise SouthArk students who are interested in continuing their education at UAMS after obtaining associate's degrees at the local college.
withrow gregMore than 300 students will be recognized as graduates of South Arkansas Community College on May 10 during Spring Commencement at the El Dorado Conference Center.

Greg Withrow, the general manager of El Dorado Chemical and a member of the SouthArk Foundation's Board of Directors, will deliver the commencement address.

Withrow is a 1980 graduate of the University of Rhode Island with a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering. He began his career as a production supervisor at PPG Industries in Barberton, Ohio, before moving accepting the position of bromine plant manager at Great Lakes Chemical in El Dorado in 1985. Withrow advanced several times, eventually becoming manufacturing services manager.
In 2003 he became the vice president of manufacturing for Working Chemical Solutions before accepting his current position at El Dorado Chemical two years later.

Withrow is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. He also has been a member of the boards of Union County Water Conservation, the Boys and Girls Club, Camp Fire, the El Dorado Chamber of Commerce, the Union County Single Parent Scholarship Fund, the Salvation Army and the Union County United Way, among others. He is the current president of the El Dorado Golf and Country Club Board of Directors.
bryan miranda cates cole davis terra
Miranda Bryan Cole Cates Terra Davis

Miranda Bryan, Terra Davis and Cole Cates all have accepted Freshman Recognition Scholarships to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.

Bryan, a senior at Junction City High School, is the daughter of Eddie and Sandra Bryan of Junction City. She is a member of the Character Council, softball team, Spanish Club, Student Council and Future Business Leaders of America, and is the JCHS yearbook editor.

Davis, a senior at Hampton High School, is the daughter of Brad and Cheyla Marlar of Hampton. She is a member of the Beta Club, Hampton Women of Wisdom and Future Business Leaders of America.

Cates, a senior at Norphlet High School, is the son of Joey and Julie Cates of Norphlet. He is a member of the National Honor Society and football team.


Leah Brown, a senior at Smackover High School, has accepted a Presidential Scholarship to attend South Arkansas Community College in the fall.
The daughter of Stephanie Brown of Louann, she is a member of the French Club, Art Club and Future Business Leaders of America.
South Arkansas Community College received awards during the semi-annual Student Recognition Ceremony recently.
Five students were named Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges: Teresa Woods of Calion, Josephine Harris and Kara Yutzy of El Dorado, Brittany Bennett of Warren and Regan Carlton of Magnolia.
Outstanding Academic Students in the liberal arts division were Taylor Walters (mathematics) and Christopher Smith (mathematics), both of El Dorado; Krista Watt (psychology) of Crossett; Luke Powell (composition) of Downsville, La.; and Alyssa Dupree (speech) of Norphlet.
Outstanding Academic Students in the business and technology division were Shelby Spears (economics), Kelly Scott (accounting), Becky Henley (business statistics) and Lesley Drummond (administrative assistance), all of El Dorado.
Outstanding Academic Students in the health and natural sciences division were Zanna Linder (registered nursing) of Hamburg; Devin Hargrave (practical nursing) of Warren; Jordan Davenport (radiologic technology) of Hampton; Kristen Tushner (radiologic technology) and Andrew Tushner (radiologic technology), both of Haynesville, La.; Stefanie Harrow (phlebotomy and electrocardiography) and Amanda Lyons (anatomy and physiology), both of El Dorado; Tiona Bramley (phlebotomy and EKG) of Summerfield, La.; Hannah Hampton (anatomy and physiology) of Rosston; Bryan Story (anatomy and physiology) of Star City; Kelly Goodwin (anatomy and physiology) of Norphlet; Angela Humphries (anatomy and physiology) and Tamara Ashcraft (chemistry), both of Camden; Courtney Coley (anatomy and physiology) and Tabatha Barbarotto (nursing assistance), both of Smackover; Callie D. Powell (anatomy and physiology) of Downsville; Lillian Shea Green (anatomy and physiology) of Junction City; Alice Winchester (personal and community health) of Magnolia; Matthew Langheld (kinesiology) of Waldo; Greg L. Taylor (physical science) of Spearsville, La.
Outstanding Student Workers were Doris Springer, Drummond and Jill Spencer, all of El Dorado.
Exemplary Student Leaders were Lawanda Hicks (Phi Theta Kappa), Lacie Murphy (Student Government Association) and Michael Welch (SGA), all of Strong; Joe Smith (SouthArk Singers) of Norphlet; Stacy Daugherty (Pi Theta Alpha) of Bastrop, La.; Sara Tinsley (Health Occupation Student Assocation) and Skylar Jones (SGA), both of Smackover; Andrew Tushner (Association of Radiologic Technology Students); Aly Coker (SGA) and Denise Hill (SGA), both of El Dorado; Laura Pennington (SGA) of Waldo; and Tiara McCray (SGA) of Magnolia.
Minding Your Ps and Qs: Business Etiquette and Professionalism, presented by the Arkansas Small Business and Technology Development Center through the South Arkansas Community College community education department, is from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Friday at the college Library Auditorium.
The non-credit course is designed to teach employees how to project the image that business owners want customers to see.
The fee is $30 per student and registration is through the college Bookstore at (870) 864-7163.
Camp Lotsafun 2013: Rockin' Through the Decades, a day camp for children, is June 3-28 at the East Campus of South Arkansas Community College.
Age groups are 6 to 8 and 9 to 12.
Each week of the camp will highlight a different decade, and will expose campers to world events both significant and not-so-significant.
For more information, call (870) 864-8456 or email ce@southark.edu.
Everyone's an Artist, a community-education painting course, is offered in separate classes at 6:30 p.m. on April 30 and on May 16. Each class is $35 and includes all supplies.
Paintings will be on 24-inch-by-24-inch canvases.
Call (870) 864-7163 to register.
The South Arkansas Community College spring concert Something for Everyone is scheduled for 7 p.m. on April 30 at the El Dorado Conference Center.
It will cover a wide range of musical tastes, from jazz to classical and many points in between.
Free and open to the public, the concert will feature the SouthArk Choral Society, SouthArk Singers and SouthArk Chamber Singers, and is directed by Victoria Harden..
John Parker and Mark LeBlanc, two automotive technology students at South Arkansas Community College's Secondary Technical Center, will compete in the Hands-On Ford-AAA Student Auto Skills State Quality Care Challenge in Little Rock on Friday.
The contest will feature 10 two-person teams from 10 automotive technology programs across the state. They will race against a clock to diagnose and repair deliberately "bugged" 2013 Ford vehicles. At stake is more than $120,000 in scholarships to technical colleges, and a trip to Dearborn, Mich., to represent Arkansas in the national finals in June at Ford's world headquarters.
Parker and LeBlanc qualified for this state finals contest by placing in a written examination competition open to all automotive technology students in Arkansas high schools. Kartsten Tidwell is the students' instructor at SouthArk and will accompany the students to the contest.
Introduction to Excel, a non-credit course at South Arkansas Community College, is from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on April 22 and April 29 at the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus.
No prior experience is needed. The fee is $30. Register at the SouthArk Bookstore at (870) 864-7163.
The South Arkansas Arboretum has extended open hours to 7 p.m. during Daylight Savings Time. Some flowers are in full bloom now at the Arboretum.
The Arboretum is managed by South Arkansas Community College.
The South Arkansas Community College Phi Beta Lambda chapter captured a host of awards at the annual PBL State Leadership Conference here over the weekend, including seven first place.
The chapter received awards for Largest Local Chapter Membership (first), Arkansas Gold Chapter (second) and Local Chapter Annual Business Report (third).
Randy Hendricks was named the 2013 Arkansas PBL Businessperson of the Year.
First-place finishers were Ruby Billings (information management); Kalan Hammett and Melissa Vestal (desktop publishing); David Joyner (cyber security); Jennifer Miletello (administrative services, telecommunications and project management) and Rachel Miller (computerized accounting).
Second-place finishers were Billings (administrative services); Tammie Carrier (project management); Leslie Drummond and Renae Gaston (desktop publishing); Latosha Gatson (computerized accounting); Noah Petty (cyber security); Katie Roberson (business communication); and Charles Rowton (telecommunications and digital video production).
Third-place finishers were Patrena Blake (chapter theme display: scrapbook); Evelyn Dirden (word processing); Donese East (administrative services); Matthew Ezell, Erma Fort and Joyner (digital video production); Roberson (information management); and Morgan Sinclair and Cortney Damron (desktop publishing).
Fourth-place finishers were Fort (cyber security) and Gatson (database designs and applications).
Fifth-place finishers were Antwonne Allen, Dillon Misenheimer and Petty (digital video production); Blake (justice administration); Tennille Davis (database design and applications); Anne Moses (computer concepts); and Sinclair (business math).
In addition, Dirden, Nikisha Faulkner, Barbara Hill, LaWanda Hicks, Camellia Lucus-Hampton and Gaston achieved the Executive Level of the Career Membership Achievement Program.
The Alpha Gamma Iota Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, the honor society for two-year colleges, will hold its member induction ceremony at 6 p.m. on April 19 at the El Dorado Conference Center. Dr. Ken Bridges will be the guest speaker.

southark-tinsley1
SouthArk Secondary Technical
Center student Sara Tinsley.
Seventeen-year-old Sara Tinsley of Smackover, a Secondary Technical Center student at South Arkansas Community College, won a statewide nursing assisting competition—and therefore a full-tuition college scholarship—at last month's Health Occupation Student Association State Conference in Hot Springs.
But the Smackover High School senior is so unassuming that she had thought that she might have fared only well enough to place third.
"I'm one of those people who doesn't think very highly of myself when it comes to things like that," Tinsley said, smiling meekly.
So when the top finishers were announced in reverse order, when third place was revealed and Tinsley's name wasn't beside it, she had given up hope of placing at all.
And then she was announced as the winner.
"Based on what she was telling me, it sounded like she'd done well," STC health professions instructor Casey Wilson said. "The look of shock on her face when they showed first place was really neat."
The Secondary Technical Center at SouthArk is for high-school students to explore career paths as part of their usual school days. The STC is housed on the East Campus and offers classes like automotive service and cosmetology. Tinsley is in her second year of the health professions program.
She was elected by her classmates as the president of their local HOSA chapter this year.
"I met Sara the summer before she was in our program, and she was very enthusiastic," instructor Beverly Land said. "Sara has a very upbeat personality. If she's having a bad day, you usually don't know it."
In addition to being a full-time high-school student splitting time between the Secondary Technical Center and Smackover High, Tinsley also holds down a 25-hour-a-week job as a waitress at a local restaurant. But both Wilson and Land said that Tinsley really learned most of the material for the nursing assisting test on her own aside from class.
"She is a good student, and she studies hard," Wilson said.
She competed in the same event last year, but failed to place, so this time she spent time on YouTube watching exactly how to execute procedures that might be part of the examination.
It helped, Tinsley said.
southark-tinsley2
Tinsley in the lab at SouthArk with
a dummy similar to the one used during Health Occupations Student
Association State Conference
testing, the results of which landed her a full-tuition scholarship.
The first part of the test was a 50-question written examination, given in the morning, and the eight students with the best scores moved on to a practical skills test in the afternoon. Question areas included making a patient's bed, infection control, reading vital signs and other basic topics dealt with by nursing assistants.
Tinsley, never one to make assumptions, did not feel after taking the test that she had qualified for the skills portion.
"I thought I missed a lot of the questions, honestly," she said, adding that while the questions were in a multiple-choice style, they were more challenging than the typical.
"All of them could be right, but you had to choose the best [response]," Tinsley said.
But after a lengthy wait while tests were scored, Tinsley discovered that she had indeed tested high enough to move on. All eight of the students who competed were transported to a rehabilitation facility and were given a specific task common to nursing assistants.
"I had to transport a patient who had a stroke into a wheelchair, and back into the bed," Tinsley said, although the "stroke" was imaginary, and the "patient" was a dummy the size of a full-grown man.
"I actually was kind of excited, because I had done that [before]," Tinsley said. "It was a lot harder, though, because [the dummy] wouldn't move with me—it was just laying there."
Not to mention that while the dummy was the size and weight of an average man, Tinsley is neither of those—making the test that much more of a challenge for the tiny teen.
"It was enough that [the judges] told me that if it was a real-life situation I would have someone helping me, because it would be too much," she said.
The hospital room where the testing took place was filled with pitfalls, Tinsley said.
"It was so cluttered that I looked around and wasn't sure where to put the wheelchair," she said, aware that everything was unfolding before the eyes of judges and their checklists. "There's all kinds of steps that you have to go through, or they knock off points."
Tinsley successfully completed the task within the allotted time frame and then went back to the conference to wait.
"I felt pretty good about it because [the judges] said 'You did a great job,' but then I figured they probably told that to everybody else too," she said.
But as it turned out, Tinsley really had done a good job—and the result was a medallion, an opportunity to compete at the national level in Nashville in June and, most significantly, a full-tuition scholarship.
She will use her scholarship to attend SouthArk as a college student beginning this fall, when she will enroll with the long-term goal of becoming a nurse.
Tinsley's win marks the first time that a student from SouthArk has placed first at the HOSA state competition in any testing category.


Date Night: Canvas Painting is a non-credit class for couples at South Arkansas Community College at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday (April 9) at the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus.
Instructor Jennifer White of The Painter's Cottage will walk couples step by step through the creation of a brightly-colored abstract heart painting. Supplies are included, including a 2-foot-by-2-foot canvas.
The cost is $35 per couple, and registration is required at the SouthArk Bookstore, (870) 864-7163.
smart elizabeth
Elizabeth Smart
Elizabeth Smart, who was the victim in a well-publicized 2002 kidnapping case, will speak at 7 p.m. on April 11 at the El Dorado Conference Center. The engagement is the final event in the 2012-2013 South Arkansas Community College Lecture Series and is co-sponsored by Healthy Woman, a service of the Medical Center of South Arkansas.
Admission is free.

Smart these days is an advocate for child abduction awareness, recovery programs and national legislation.
Her harrowing nine-month ordeal, beginning with abduction from her bedroom at age 14 and concluding with her return by police to her family, led her to create the Elizabeth Smart Foundation. The organization's aim is to assist young people to avoid or recover from violent events.

Smart regularly helps promote the national Amber Alert system, the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act and other safety legislation to help prevent abductions. She also is a correspondent for ABC News.

Prior to her speaking engagement, Smart will appear at Healthy Woman's Ladies' Night Out event, which begins at 5:30 p.m. at the conference center. It includes gourmet hors d'oeuvres, wine tasting, giveaways, health information and screenings.

Ladies' Night Out tickets are $10 and are available at themedcenter.net/healthywoman or by calling (870) 864-3245.
A new non-credit class for managers is being offered by South Arkansas Community College from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on April 11 in Room 121 at the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus.
Coaching and Teambuilding Skills for Managers and Supervisors with instructor Tim Frazier is designed to improve the people skills, conflict management, motivational talents and production capabilities of supervisors.
Frazier has both a doctor's degree and a master's degree in organizational leadership and management, and a bachelor's degree in communication.
The cost is $225 per student, which includes a workbook and lunch.
Deadline to register is on Friday.  Call (870) 864-7193 for more information.
The University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff Vesper Choir will perform as part of Upward Bound Gospel Fest V at South Arkansas Community College at 6 p.m. on April 13 at the El Dorado Conference Center.
The cost is $5 at the door.
The Vesper Choir, under the direction of UAPB professor of music Dr. Michael J. Bates, is a 65-member ensemble founded in the 1940s.
Also featured at the event will be the Upward Bound Choir.
Funds raised will benefit the Upward Bound program at SouthArk.
The second annual SouthArk Career Fair will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on April 10 at Murphy Hall I of the El Dorado Conference Center.
Representatives from a number of different fields, including health and medicine, multimedia, criminal justice, wildlife service and others, will be on hand to discuss their work, job opportunities, pay scales and any other pertinent information that career seekers need. Assistants from SouthArk also will be there for consultation, to make the connection between college offerings and these career goals.
Coping With Caregiving is a Noon Symposium aimed at the caregivers of Alzheimer's disease patients on Tuesday (March 26) at the South Arkansas Community College Library.
Amber Holland of the Alzheimer's Association will discuss how to handle caregiver stress and easier ways to cope with the challenges of taking care of a person stricken with forms of dementia.
Attendees are encouraged to bring lunches with them; drinks and desserts will be provided.
The South Arkansas Community College Motorcycle Poker Run to benefit the American Cancer Society will be held at 9 a.m. on April 13 beginning at the SouthArk Gymnasium on the West Campus in El Dorado.
The entry fee is $25 ($10 for each additional hand). The winner will receive 10 percent of the total collected fees. The first 50 to register will receive free T-shirts.
Registration is now open at the college in Administration Building Suite 105 on the West Campus. Call Becky Riggs at (870) 864-7146 or Cynthia Reyna at (870) 864-7130 for more information.
Intermediate Cake Decorating is a non-credit class at South Arkansas Community College from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursdays on March 28-May 2 at the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus.
Students will concentrate on professional presentation, and will ice and stack a wedding cake on the final night of class.
Completion of the Beginning Cake Decorating class, or adequate experience in cake decorating, is required to take this course.
The class is $65. Students must have their own supplies. Register at the SouthArk Bookstore, (870) 864-7163.
Mommy and Me: Canvas Painting is a non-credit class at South Arkansas Community College from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on March 18 at the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus.
Jennifer White of The Painter's Cottage will lead mother-child pairs through painting a canvas picture, step by step.
The cost is $30 per pair (includes supplies). Register at the SouthArk Bookstore by calling (870) 864-7163.
South Arkansas Community College will present Cultural Diversity Issues, a community-education class on issues of race, class and gender, from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on March 28 at Room 121 of the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus.
The fee is $20 and includes the cost of lunch.
The instructor is Dr. Pamela Saulsberry, head of the School of Social Sciences at the University of Louisiana-Monroe. She is a graduate of Jackson (Miss.) State University with a doctor's degree, of the University of Denver with a master's degree and of Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colo., with a bachelor's degree. In her 30 years of classroom teaching experience she has examined topics of racial socialization, community involvement and child welfare.
To register, call the SouthArk Bookstore at (870) 864-7163.
Mommy and Me: Natural Easter-Egg Dying, a community-education course at South Arkansas Community College, will be from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday (March 9) at the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus.
The fee is $15 per mother-daughter tandem; register at the SouthArk Bookstore at (870) 864-7163.
johnson ben
Dr. Ben Johnson
Author and historian Dr. Ben Johnson, a professor at Southern Arkansas University in Magnolia, will present "Making Arkansas Dry: The War Against Drink in Arkansas" at the South Arkansas Community College Library Auditorium at 6:30 p.m. on March 12. The program is part of an ongoing series of history lectures co-sponsored by SouthArk and the South Arkansas Historical Foundation.

The event is free and open to the public.

The presentation will describe the rise of anti-alcohol organizations in the late 19th Century, and the victory of the "dry" movement to outlaw alcohol consumption in Arkansas even before national prohibition. Statewide alcohol prohibition would not endure, but local option elections would leave Arkansas divided between wet and dry counties.
Johnson is the author of "John Barleycorn Must Die: The War Against Drink in Arkansas," published in 2007; and "Arkansas in Modern America," published in 2000. A native of west Texas, he has been at SAU since 2001. He was the dean of the College of Liberal and Performing Arts in 2007-'11. He also has been on the Board of Editors at the Arkansas Historical Quarterly and is a former chair of the Board of Directors of the Arkansas Humanities Council.
This project is sponsored in part by a grant from the Arkansas Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities.


Author and historian Dr. Ben Johnson, a professor at Southern Arkansas University in Magnolia, will present "Making Arkansas Dry: The War Against Drink in Arkansas" at the South Arkansas Community College Library Auditorium at 6:30 p.m. on March 12. The program is part of an ongoing series of history lectures co-sponsored by SouthArk and the South Arkansas Historical Foundation.
The event is free and open to the public.
Johnson is the author of "John Barleycorn Must Die: The War Against Drink in Arkansas," published in 2007; and "Arkansas in Modern America," published in 2000.
This project is sponsored in part by a grant from the Arkansas Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Two non-credit class series offered by South Arkansas Community College are beginning next week.
The first session of the six-part In Stitches Crochet series will be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Monday (Feb. 18) at the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus. The class covers a single crochet stitch. Each session of the series will cover a different stitch. Students should bring yarn and a set of crochet hooks (size D or larger). The cost is $15.
The first session of the three-part Buon Appetito! Italian Cooking series is from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 21 at the South Arkansas Community College Gymnasium on the West Campus. The class covers fettuccine alfredo. Later sessions will cover other dishes. The cost is $15.
To register for these classes, call (870) 864-7163. More information is available by emailing ce@southark.edu.
South Arkansas Community College has announced its Dean's List for the fall 2012 semester.
Making the list are:
From Bearden, Laura Hopkins.
From Benton, Timothy Haynes.
From Cabot, Justin Fuller.
From Camden, Tamara Ashcraft, Alyssa Bradford, Kimberly Bunn, Bettina Confron, Evelyn Dirden, Shontera Fountain, Matthew Jacobs, Sheri Kyle, Michelle Russell, Gerald Stinnett and Brittney Williams.
From Conway, Jarrod Ritchie and Amanda White.
From Crossett, Rhea Avant, Christy Baker, Carl Cox, Taylor McClain and Autumn White.
From El Dorado, Dakota Baker, Matt Barnes, Tracey Barnhart, Caitlin Barron, Elizabeth Beaudoin-Fogle, Rachel Blackman, Shaiandrea Blair, Ashly Boone, Shelby Box, Natalie Brewster, Lydia Briggs, Rosalin Broadnax, Xavier Brogdon, Jay Brown, Sherria Buffington, Megan Calaway, Leola Caro, Chiauna Carter, Kimberly Childers, James Cogdell, Alyson Coker, Kelsie Crawford, Patricia Crawford, Casey Cripe, Sasha Crotty, Jamie Cupples, Shakelia Davis, Maribel De Arnold, Whit Deason, Breuna Dixon, Keisha Dougan, Amanda Drake, David Duffer, Daniel East, Benjamin Endel, Keeley Evers, Shannon Fetterly, Elizabeth Fields, Ashley Ford, Dana Francy, Antuan George, Kenneth Gilbert, Deatred Glover, Amanda Graves, Raelene Guthrie, Camellia Hampton, Leah Harrell, Taresa Haynes, Carla Hill, Xzavier Hollins, Lisa Hollis, Brandon Hughes, Shaquille Iverson, Jimmie Jerry, Bonnie Johansson, Sylvia Johnson, William Johnson, Michelle Jones, David Joyner, Donna Karch, Victoria Kennedy, Nicole Kilcrease, Cierra Killingsworth, Michelle Lein, Nicole Lovett, Andrea Lovvorn, Adrienne Loyd, Valerie Lumsey, Michael Lundy, Jennifer Martindale, Doris Joleen Mbiu, Joanna McCathern, Hannah McGaha, Britany McGaugh, Joshua McKay, Kristi McKinney, Jessica Meyer, Kitianna Miles, Rachel Miller, Terrill Miller, Daniel Modica, Madison Monroe, King Montgomery, Rachell Montgomery, Benjamin Moore, Cheryl Moore, Adam Morgan, Keith Morris, Alma Moses, Amanda Murphy, Valerie Murphy, Sara Murry, Brian Nash, Jennifer Odom, Kelly Parker, Memory Parker, Tarah Peterson, Monica Phifer, David Primm, Ashley Pruitt, Jose Pulido, Sarah Pumphrey, Morris Reynolds, Ashleigh Riggs, Ashley Rowland, Britteny Ruff, Zachary Sanders, Karen Sanford, Michael Sexton, Micheal Shanks, Jeanne Shew, Shelise Shutes, Heather Smith, Johnetta Smith, Jonathan Smith, Joseph Smith, Eric Stevens, Tyler Steward, Kyra Taylor, Charleeka Thompson, Lisa Thompson, Whitney Thurmon, Charlesetta Wallace, Kelsey Webb, Rebecca Wilburn, Kara Yutzy
From Emerson, Catherine Dean.
From Fordyce, Natalie Finks, Larresha Proctor, Brian Sledge and Kaitlyn West.
From Hamburg, Jacob Allen, Meagan Brooks and Jacob Jeffers.
From Hampton, Shelia Barron, Jordan Davenport, Emily Thomason and Whitney Trotter.
From Harrell, Richard Carter.
From Hermitage, Amanda Adair and Carlee Smith.
From Hope, Kayla Rider.
From Hot Springs, Jonathan Cater.
From Jersey, Amber Hudson.
From Junction City, Erica Andrews, Shanna Brown, Jeremy Crew, Joy Griffith, Kelly Guice-Pepper, Kalan Hammett, Denzel Hayes, Fredrick Johnson, Cara McLelland, Kalyn Novack, Hannah Smith, Lindsey Thurmon, Kasie Tolbert-Lynn, Lakura Warren and Jill Wilson.
From Lawson, Jenifer Benitez.
From Little Rock, Daniel Dober, Jason Henderson, Christine Slyby, Joshua Slyby and Philip Wightman.
From Louann, David Hughes and Jennifer Lane.
From Magnolia, Tabatha Burdine, Verna Carter, Yolanda Daniels, Sha'kendra Easter, Shannon Hight, Tina Johnson, Atiya Leaks, John Lee, Kyeshia Lewis, Erica Mallory, Megan Shehane, Kristina Shinn, Alice Winchester and Michael Young.
From McGehee, Bernetta Esters and Taaja Newhouse.
From McNeil, Emily Vaughn.
From Monticello, Hugh Arrington, Megan Boykin, Rebecca Groeteke, Tammy Higgins and Sandy Sanders.
From Mount Holly, Jasmine Hunter.
From Nashville, Christi Beth and Kendreau Haywood.
From Norphlet, Alyssa Dupree, Johnathan Estes, Haden Harris, Sara Hisaw and Ashley Vedder.
From Paron, Sarah Loudon.
From Rison, Amanda Edmonds and Amy Fugate.
From Smackover, Ruby Billings, Leah Boyce, Julie Conway, Valerie Davis, Joede Fleming, Henriettia Gaston, Jennifer Jones, Wesley Jones, Lashona Miller, Katelyn Phillips, Danyelle Smeltzer and Alexis Womack.
From Sparkman, Hailey Massey.
From Stamps, Latonya Easley.
From Stephens, Laci Dozier, Emily Hust, Shanedra Leaks, Patricia McCollum, Raven McDonald, Betty Roberson and Trevelle Todd.
From Strong, Jamye Baker, Emma Banes, Takeshia Ford, Latosha Gatson, Pearline Gill, Lawanda Hicks and Inez Robinson.
From Taylor, Emy Butler, Latricia Spelce, Miranda Taylor and Jennifer Tompkins.
From Waldo, Kayla Millican.
From Warren, Dominique Ashford, Brittany Bennett, Raquel Gonzales, Rhonda Gorman, Tiffany Hamilton, Devin Hargrave, Jacquelyne Jackson, Tonicka Mason, Britny Neimeth, Tabathia Peacock, Catherine Rauls, Gregory Scott, Callie Simmons, Brynn Stanchfield, Jessica Sutherland and Jamie Wolfe.
From Wilmar, Tracy Daniel.
From Arcadia, La., Seth Smith.
From Bastrop, La., Stacy Daugherty and John Sims.
From Bernice, La., Allison Matherne.
From Farmerville, La., Kathy Burns, Abbie Moon, Moira Reeves and Rhonda Williams.
From Haynesville, La., Kimberly Hamilton, Milaka Hubbard, Andrew Tushner and Kristen Tushner.
From Lillie, La., Zachary Gunter.
From Marion, La., Charissa McKinnie.
From Ruston, La., Bridget Kleman.
From Spearsville, La., Randall Banks, Donese East and Terrell Glosson.
From Tallulah, La., Candace Street.
From West Monroe, La., Joshua Owen.
Fundamentals of 5 Dynamics is a non-credit class offered by South Arkansas Community College from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Feb. 28 at the Center for Workforce Development on the East Campus.
With 5 Dynamics consulting services vice president David Zweig, the class will provide an introduction to the company's proprietary methods. The 5 Dynamics framework attempts to achieve better business results through matching employee talents with work duties.
The 5 Dynamics method has been used in a wide variety of industries, including hospital, insurance, technology and pharmaceutical industries.
The instructor is a graduate both of Yale College and Harvard Business School, and is the co-author of "Money for Nothing: How CEOs and Boards are Bankrupting America."
The class is $275 per student and includes an online assessment and access to the 5 Dynamics online database for one year. For more information, contact dean Jamie McConathy at (870) 864-7193 or jmcconathy@southark.edu.
southark-warrenpnOfficers in the practical nursing class at the South Arkansas Community College Education Center in Warren were elected recently.

The are, front row, from left, media committee member Carlee Smith of Hermitage, media committee Chair Brianna McElfresh of Camden, Chaplain Kelsie Myers of Hermitage, Vice President Etoya Williams of Monticello, social committee Chair Anna Juarez of Warren and social committee member Melissa Arreguin of Hampton.

Back row, media committee member Holly Fuel of Warren, Treasurer Justin Wilcoxon of Crossett, President Marcus Green of Monticello and social committee member Wykiki Green of Monticello.
South Arkansas Community College is seeking nominations for its annual President's Award, the Spirit of SouthArk.
The award seeks to honor any individual, group or organization that has advanced the college's efforts to deliver on its stated mission to provide educational opportunities and cultural enrichment to the region.
Nominations must include a letter stating why the nominee is deserving and how the nominee meets the criteria. Appropriate support would include a biography, resume and other letters of support. The name of the nominator also must be included.
Nominations must be submitted by March 29 to President at P.O. Box 7010 in El Dorado, 71731.
The public is invited to attend a free showing of more than 15 pieces of artwork owned by the SHARE Foundation and recently relocated to the South Arkansas Community College Library from its former home at Warner Brown Hospital.
The event is 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Feb. 18.
Officials at South Arkansas Community College on Wednesday morning received a report that a company had solicited advertising from an area business for a printed game schedule for the South Arkansas Community College Cougars sports team.
The problem? There is no such sports team. In fact, SouthArk has no sports teams at all.
College officials are advising citizens and business owners throughout the region that any such solicitations should be considered bogus and therefore should be ignored.
SouthArk administrators have alerted the Arkansas Attorney General's Office about the situation.
southark-aaffdsmith southark-aaffdpayne southark-aaffdhill southark-aaffdwilliams
Dr. Robert E. Smith Dr. Willie W. Payne Dr. Fitz Hill Rudy Williams

Arkansas Baptist College president Dr. Fitz Hill, former Pontiac, Mich., Mayor Dr. Willie W. Payne and Total Outreach for Christ Ministries founder Dr. Robert E. Smith will participate in a panel discussion, Politics in Black America, during the free African American Family and Friends Day on Feb. 23 at South Arkansas Community College.
The discussion will be moderated by West Monroe, La., NBC TV news co-anchor Rudy Williams.
The three panelists are highly-regarded speakers in different areas.
Hill, the former head football coach at San Jose State University and a former University of Arkansas assistant coach, co-wrote the recently-published book "Crackback! How College Football Blindsides the Hopes of Black Coaches." Recognized as an expert in this field, Hill's work has been featured on a number of different TV programs, referenced in many newspaper and magazine articles and brought before a special congressional committee. The topic of black head football coaches is especially pertinent at this time; the NFL found itself in some controversy recently since none of its eight head-coaching vacancies were filled by black coaches.
He is a native Arkansan and a graduate of Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia with a bachelor's degree in communications and physical education, of Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, La., with a master's degree in student personnel services and of the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville with a doctor's degree in education. He also received a Bronze Star and a Commendation Medal for services rendered during Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm in Iraq in the early 1990s.
After leaving Houston Nutt's Razorback staff to become the first black head football coach in San Jose State history in 2001-2004, Hill joined the staff of his alma mater OBU. He became the president of historically-black Arkansas Baptist in Little Rock in 2006.
During his tenure the college has gone from fears of bankruptcy and loss of accreditation to growth and unprecedented success, including swelling in enrollment from fewer than 200 students in 2006 to more than 1,100 now.
Payne, a native of Spearsville, La., was the mayor of Pontiac in 2002-2006. His book "The Todd Road Incident" concerns a well-publicized 1983 event in Montgomery, Ala., that involved a Pontiac family and led to racial unrest in the Alabama town.
The book is based on research that Payne conducted as an investigative reporter at The Oakland Press, a Pontiac newspaper, where he worked in 1978-1985. Payne is attempting to have his book adapted into a film.
He is a graduate of Grambling State University with a bachelor's degree in journalism.
Payne left the press and became a police officer for the Pontiac force in 1985, where he worked until 2002. Entering politics, he was a member of the Pontiac School Board before his successful mayoral bid.
Smith, a native Arkansan, began his church in Little Rock in 1981 after a number of years as a traveling evangelist. Through print and broadcast media, Total Outreach for Christ has grown into a global ministry.
Smith also started a private kindergarten-through-12th-grade school, Word of Outreach Christian Center and Academy, in Little Rock in 1989.
His book "The Elimination of Erroneous Distinctions in the Body of Christ" deals with, among other topics, racial barriers in religion. Smith's work has drawn the attention and fervent support of current Fox News talk-show host and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, among others.
In 2008, Smith was an Arkansas delegate to the Republican National Convention.
Williams is an award-winning news broadcaster and has been at NBC 10 since 2008. He began his career when he still was in high school in Jackson, Miss. He worked both in broadcast and print journalism jobs in Atlanta, New York, Chicago and Gary, Ind., before going to the West Monroe station.
The panel discussion will be from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Other highlights of the day include an Arkansas Minority Health Commission health fair from 8 a.m. to noon; a series of workshops such as genealogy research for black families, hip-hop aerobics and organizing a bid for political office from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; a myriad of games geared toward all age groups including a dominoes tournament all afternoon; live musical performances; and a Corvette car show.
Lunch also will be provided, and those who arrive early will have a chance to receive a free African American Family and Friends Day shirt.
Admission to this event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit facebook.com/southark.
southark-scout
South Arkansas Arboretum Board member Matthew Connior, far right, presents a letter of thanks on Monday to Boy Scout Eryk Villano written by Board President Bob Watson. Villano was recognized for leading a project to construct eight new trash cans at the Arboretum. One is pictured here. The Arboretum is managed by South Arkansas Community College.
Over the last three months, 16-year-old Eryk Villano of El Dorado led a team of more than 20 people in constructing and placing eight new wooden trash cans at the South Arkansas Arboretum. His initiative and contribution were recognized on Monday.

Villano, who has been a member of the Boy Scouts organization since age 7, is working toward the rank of Eagle Scout. In order to get there, among other tasks he needed to complete a service project.
The Arboretum Board knew that the park was in need of new and sturdier trash cans, but had to find volunteers to construct them.
The local Boy Scout Executive Board felt as though this would be a good project for a prospective Eagle Scout and connected the Arboretum Board to Villano through Scout Master Wayne Harrell.
Villano accepted the challenge.

"I have to tell the boys that it's not doing a project, it's planning and preparing," Harrell said.

In other words, Villano's role was less carpenter and more project foreman, although there was plenty of hands-on labor involved for him personally. The eight trash receptacles took more than 100 man hours to complete; at the apex, a dozen workers carried out the project under Villano's guidance.

"It's really a leadership role," Villano said. "You have to get everything organized."

The Arboretum is managed by South Arkansas Community College. Physical plant director Graham Peterson designed the trash cans and gave the plans and materials over to Villano, who constructed a prototype that was approved by the Arboretum Board before he moved forward with the project.

He said that the amount of woodwork done "was kind of a new major thing" for him, although he had built smaller wooden items at home previously.
Harrell said that his Troop has had 42 Eagles in its history, and that Villano could be No. 43.

"He's a good kid, and a good organizer," Harrell said.

Villano said that he has three uncles who were Eagle Scouts and was inspired to get into Scouting because of them.
"It sounded like a good adventure," he said.


PHOTO


Schedules

 

Note:Users printing the schedule in the Firefox browser must print less than 7 pages at a time.

How to Read the Schedule

  • Abbreviations
    • TBA = To Be Announced
    • M = Monday
    • T = Tuesday
    • W = Wednesday
    • R = Thursday
    • F = Friday

  • Meaning of Course - Section Column
    • First 3 or 4 letters indicate the subject.
    • The first 2 digits indicate the level:   1=Freshman, 2= Sophomore
    • The last digit (before the period) indicates the credits. eg.1013=3 credits

  • After the period (section number):
    • 01-15 = West Campus courses offered 8 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.
    • 17 or 80s = short term or workshop courses
    • 20s = West Campus evening courses
    • 30s = Blackboard assisted courses
    • 40-44 = courses offered in Warren
    • 50-69 = East Campus courses offered 8 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.
    • 60, 61, 67 = Special cohort courses
    • 70s = East Campus evening courses
    • 90s = off campus or Internet courses

Building Designations

  • East Campus, 3696 East Main Road
    • Center for Workforce Development: WFD
    • Industrial-Technical Building: IND
    • McGehee Classroom Building: MCG
    • Welding Building: WEL
  • West Campus, 300 South West Avenue
    • Administration Building: ADM
    • Computer Technology Building: TEC Gymnasium: GYM
    • Health Science Center: HSC
    • Whitfield Classroom Building: WHT
  • Off Campus
    • Various Clinical Sites: HOSP
    • Warren Campus: WARREN
    • Online Courses: ONLINE (See online section for more information)

Dates

Below are the final exam dates for Summer 2013.

  • June 26     Final Exams for First Summer
  • July 31      Final Exams for Second Summer and Long Summer

Summer Final exams are given during normal class hours.

Below are the final exam dates for Fall 2013.

CLASS   EXAM DAY EXAM DATE EXAM TIME
MW 8:10 MON  DEC 2 8:00 – 10:00
TR 8:10 TUE  DEC 3 8:00 – 10:00
MW 9:35 WED  DEC 4 8:00 – 10:00
TR 9:35 THUR  DEC 5 8:00 – 10:00
MW 11:00 MON  DEC 2 10:00 – 12:00
TR 11:00 TUE  DEC 3 10:00 – 12:00
MW 1:00 WED DEC 4 10:00 – 12:00
TR 1:00 THUR DEC 5 1:00 – 3:00
CLASS   EXAM DAY EXAM DATE EXAM TIME
MW 2:35 MON  DEC 2 1:00 – 3:00
TR 2:35 TUE  DEC 3 1:00 – 3:00
MW 4:00 WED  DEC 4 3:00 – 5:00
TR 4:00 THUR  DEC 5 3:00 – 5:00
MW 5:30 MON  DEC 2 5:00 – 7:00
TR 5:30 TUE  DEC 3 5:00 – 7:00
MW 7:00 WED  DEC 4 5:00 – 7:00
TR 7:00 THUR  DEC 5 5:00 – 7:00


Final exams in labs should be given the last day of class prior to finals.

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Academic Calendar Summer 2013

  • April 1     Financial Aid Complete File Deadline
  • April 22 - May 28       Early registration via Campus Connect
  • April 22 - June 10      Payment Arrangements Available Online - FACTS
  • May 15     Early Registration Payment Deadline or Payment Arrangements (Deadline 4 p.m. - classes will be dropped for non-payment)
  • May 22 - May 23     On-Campus Registration for First Summer and Long Summer (Enrollment Services Office 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.)
  • May 27     Last Day of Registration via Campus Connect
  • May 27     Memorial Day (College Closed)
  • May 28     First Day of Classes for First Summer and Long Summer
  • May 29     Last Day to Add Classes for First Summer and Long Summer
  • May 30     Graduation Applications Due
  • June 25     Last Day of Classes for First Summer
  • June 26     Final Exams for First Summer
  • June 26 - 27     On-Campus Registration for Second Summer
  • July 1     First Day of Classes for Second Summer
  • July 2     Last Day to Add Classes for Second Summer
  • July 4     Independence Day (College Closed)
  • July 30     Last day of Classes for Second Summer and Long Summer
  • July 31     Final Exams for Second Summer and Long Summer
  • August 2     Commencement
  • August 7     Grades Available via Campus Connect


Academic Calendar Fall 2013

    • June 1     Financial Aid Complete File Deadline
    • April 29 - August 13       Early registration via Campus Connect
    • April 28 - September 5      Payment Arrangements Available Online - FACTS
    • August 13     Early Registration Payment Deadline or Payment Arrangements (Deadline 4 p.m. - classes will be dropped for non-payment)
    • August 13 - 18     Regular Registration via Campus Connect (Enrollment Services Office 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.)
    • August 13     New student orientation, advising and registration
    • August 14     College closed until 10:00am
    • August 15 - 16     On-Campus Registration for Fall
    • August 19    First Day of Classes for Fall
    • August 21     Last Day to Add Classes for Fall
    • September 2     Labor Day Holiday, college closed
    • September 6     Last day to change to audit status
    • October 9     Graduation Applications Due
    • November 15     Last day to withdraw from a course with a grade of "W"
    • November 26     Last Day of Classes for Fall
    • November 28-29     Thanksgiving Holiday, campus closed
    • December 2-5     Final Exams
    • December 6     Semester Ends
    • December 6     Grades due Electronically
    • December 9-12     Assessment Days
    • December 13     Commencement
    • December 21     Grades Available via Campus Connect


The college reserves the right to adjust the calendar in the event of inclement weather or other unforeseen circumstances.

Tuition

Payment of Tuition

This represents Tuition costs as of April 19, 2013 - there will be modest increases in tution for the fall term
SouthArk offers a variety of Financial Aid programs, including scholarships, Pell Grants, SEOG Grants, Arkansas Student Assistance Grants, Work Study programs, and Federal Family Educational Loan programs. Priority deadline to apply for financial aid is April 1, 2012. Students may still apply after the priority deadline but cannot be guaranteed the results of their aid by the first day of the summer term.

In-District Tuition..........................$79 per credit hour
Out-of-District Tuition..................$91 per credit hour
Out-of-State Tuition....................$165 per credit hour

FACTS Tuition Payment Plan

To help you meet your educational expenses, South Arkansas Community College is pleased to offer FACTS as a convenient budget plan.  FACTS is a tuition management plan that provides you with a low cost option of budgeting tuition expenses.  The only cost to budget monthly payments through FACTS is a $25.00 per semester nonrefundable fee.  Enrolling online is simple and secure.  To sign up for FACTS log on to www.southark.edu.

  1. Select Campus Connect
  2. Select student access
  3. Enter student ID and Pin # (birth date and upper case initials – 01011985XX)
  4. Change demographic data if needed; if correct select no changes
  5. Select Student Information.  Scroll down to review/pay account
  6. Select term that you are registered and submit
  7. Your statement of account will be displayed at bottom select Pay by FACTS button
  8. This takes you to the FACTS Tuition Management website.  It should display amount to be paid. Click on arrange payments for current balance and follow the simple steps outlined by FACTS.

Full payments can also be made to students' accounts at no additional cost by using FACTS.  All payments through FACTS are processed electronically by using a checking account, MasterCard, Visa, Discover or American Express.

Table of Tuition for 1-18 Credits

Hours In-District Out-of-District Out-of-State
1 79 91 165
2 158 182 330
3 237 273 495
4 316 364 660
5 395 455 825
6 474 546 990
7 553 637 1155
8 632 728 1320
9 711 819 1485
10 790 910 1650
11 869 1001 1815
12 948 1092 1980
13 1027 1183 2145
14 1106 1274 2310
15 1185 1365 2475
16 1264 1456 2640
17 1343 1547 2805
18 plus 1422 1638 2970

Refunds

Long Summer
Tuition
Before May 29
100%
May 29
95%
May 30-June 7
75%
June 11-19
50%
After June 19
0%
Fees
Before May 29
100%
May 29 and after
0%
  
First Summer
Tuition
Before May 29
100%
May 29
95%
May 30-31
75%
June 4-6
50%
After June 6
0%
Fees
Before May 29
100%
May 29 and after 0%
 
  
Second Summer
Tuition
Before July 5
100%
July 5
95%
July 6-10
75%
July 11-16
50%
After July 16
0%
Fees
Before July 5
100%
July 5 and after
0%

Fees

Pass-Through Fees

Pass-Through fees may be increased or changed at any time. Pass-Through fees are defined as fees collected by the College from the student to pay for specific expenditures associated with program testing and background checks required by external third-party entities such as accrediting agencies or clinical/practicum sites.  Vendors periodically increase their costs and this cost is passed on to the student.

Tuition, fees and other charges are under review and remain subject to change at any time.


Mandatory Fees

 

Assessment    

$20 per semester                       

Technology

$7 per credit hour   

Activity

$1 per credit hour

Support          

$1 per credit hour          

Security          

$2 per credit hour

 

Course-Related Fees and Other Charges

 

CDA Assessment        

$325

Challenge Test (per test)          


$7 plus 12 per credit hour

COMPASS Test           

$10

Developmental Math Course Fee     

$25 per semester

Drop/Add (per form)     

$5

Drug Screen Test         

$35

Education CPR

$75

Golf     

$45

Health Science Background Check 

$53

Health Science CPR    

$45

Health Science Insurance (Accident)        

$6 per semester

Health Science Insurance (Liability)         

$18 per semester

Health Science Travel and Professional Development

 
    Medical Lab 

$50 Fall/Spring semester

    Occupational Therapy Assistant         

$50 semester

    Physical Therapist Assistant         

$75 Fall/Spring semester

    Practical Nursing (Days/Warren) 

$20 per semester

    Practical Nursing (Evenings)       

$15 per semester

    Radiologic Technology           

$50 Fall/Spring semester

    Registered Nursing  

$60 per semester

    Respiratory Therapy

$50 per semester

    Surgical Technology

$50 Fall/Spring semester

ID Card Replacement   

$8

Laboratory Fees          
Check “Fee” column in course listing


 
Music (private lessons)     

$100 per credit hour

Network Security Background Check 

$50

Online Courses

$20 per credit hour

Occupational Therapy Assistant Testing

 
    AOTA          

$75

    NBCOT       

$45

PEARSON Exit Exam-Intermediate Algebra    

$10

PEARSON Exit Exam-Writing II         

$7

Physical Therapist Assistant Testing

$220

Practical Nursing Assessment Test    

$112 per semester

Practical Nursing ATI Retake Exam  

$40

Radiologic Technology Testing           

$140

Registered Nursing

 
   Supply (per course)  

$60 per semester

   Testing         

$140 per semester

Respiratory Therapy Data ARC           

$60

STEP Assessment       

$30

Surgical Techology Northstar Learning          

$39

Surgical Technology Testing           

$237

Transcript        


Free


Tuition, fees and other charges are under review and remain subject to change at any time. 

Blackboard

How to access SouthArk's Blackboard system

Blackboard accounts will be accessible by the first day of classes

  1. Open Internet Explorer.
  2. Go to www.southark.edu and click on the Blackboard link, or just go to blackboard.southark.edu.
  3. Click on Login.
  4. Type in your username and password:
  5. UserName: (not case-sensitive) First three letters of first name, first three letters of last name, last four numbers of student ID-- Example for John Smith: johsmi6789
    Password: (use upper case) birth-date in numerical form, FIRST INITIAL, LAST INITIAL

If you have any additional questions, please contact your instructor or call 870/864.7120.

Email

How to access your SouthArk  email account

  1. Open Internet Explorer
  2. Go to webmail.southark.edu OR go to www.southark.edu and click on the Campus Email link.
  3. Type in your email address and password:
  4. Your email address will be your
  5. UserName: (not case-sensitive ) First three letters of first name, first three letters of last name, last four numbers of student ID-- Example for John Smith: johsmi6789
  6. Password: (use upper case) birth-date in numerical form, FIRST INITIAL, LAST INITIAL
  7. Example of password for John Smith: 01011993JS

 

Online

Online or Distance-Learning Courses

Many of our courses are now taught online via the Internet. This means that you do not need to come to campus. Take a look at this list of what you'll need in order to be successful in an online course.

To take an online course, you should:

Be comfortable using a computer

  • Have regular/daily access to the internet on a computer in your home
  • Know how to use an internet browser, such as Internet Explorer or Firefox
  • Create, save, print, and manage computer files
  • Copy and paste information using the clipboard between applications
  • Send and receive email messages and attachments
  • Use word processing software, like Microsoft Word

    and

  • Set aside enough time for your work each week
  • Be a self-starter
  • Communicate adequately in writing
  • Have good reading skills
  • Follow written instructions and be able to work on your own
  • Have a quiet place to study and login to your online courses
  • Contact your instructor when you don't understand something
 
For more information about Online Learning at SouthArk, contact an advisor.

Records

Records Policy

The information contained in STUDENT RECORDS is generally regarded as private and confidential. PUBLIC INFORMATION given to any inquirer is an exception. Public Information includes the following: Name, address, phone number, place of birth, academic major, high school attended, non-academic honors, dates of attendance, class schedule and classification. If students desire that public information relating to them not be released, they should notify the REGISTRAR in writing before the close of registration.

South Arkansas Community College offers a wide variety of activities and events for students, both traditional and non-traditional.  Along with our highly regarded Lecture Series, we also host a Noon Symposium every month covering a number of popular topics.  For high school student anticipating a college career we host both Senior Day and College Night.  For the outdoor types we host the SouthArk Expo every other year.  The literary afficianados will appreciate the Writer's Ink and Madrigal Feaste.  Plus there are always a number of choral concerts throughout the year.  There is so much to do and experience at SouthArk.  We welcome you to come and see for yourself!

 

Here is the monthly calendar of events