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El Dorado's Vision for Education, 1909

EL DORADO'S VISION FOR EDUCATION, 1909

By Bart Reed

Boosterism was a prominent theme in El Dorado, Arkansas, in 1909. In that year, the Annual Announcement of El Dorado Public High School was published, written by school officials T. C. Abbot and John G. Pipkin. It included the highest praise for the "location and advantages" offered by El Dorado as a place to "rear and educate your children into polished men and women." The following document from 1909 includes a civic description of El Dorado, the Board of Education, faculty, calendar, and curriculum. Of interest, too, were the "advertisements" of local businesses. They were the "Partners-in-Education" of 1909. Many names of the school board and faculty of that year are still recognized by many today as names of local schools and streets. The curriculum of that day was particularly strong in the humanities and foreign languages.

Annual Announcement of El Dorado Public High School
Session 1909-10
El Dorado Public High School
LOCATION AND ADVANTAGES
Situated on the highest point in Union county, with an atmosphere free from material poisons but abundant with the sweet scented ozone, famous for its health-giving vigor; lighted with a modern electric light plant; supplied with excellent water from a complete system of waterworks and with an extensive sewerage system under plans of construction; surrounded by fertile farming and fruit lands; inhabited by 6500 of as hospitable, progressive, refined, and cultured people as are found anywhere; with her excellent $60,000 school building and new college under construction, El Dorado has many educational advantages to offer your boys and girls and more inducements to men and women as a city in which to rear and educate your children into polished men and women.
With three railroads, three banks, several wholesale houses, hotels and a new $60,000 one under construction together with her many industries and 18 miles of concrete sidewalks one may form a faint idea of the energy and progressive spirit that obtains among our citizenship. Nor are our people interested in the material alone, the religious and moral and social life is even more encouraging and inspiring. We have three beautiful churches, no saloons, no gambling houses, and no places of vice. Public spirit runs high and does much to advance the cause of education. In selecting a home for yourselves or a school for your child we respectfully invite you to consider the many favorable advantages El Dorado has to offer.

WHEN, WHY AND HOW WE MUST
Educate Our Boys and Girls
There should be no necessity for a discussion of this subject. Yet, I believe it does exist, not because parents do not know the importance of an education but because many of them in the mad rush of life do not stop to consider seriously the value to their children, in all of its phases. Especially do I believe that many fail to comprehend the gravity of the responsibility to which they have obligated themselves in this matter by becoming parents.
One of the distinguishing marks between animals of the lower order and man is the great difference in their capacity to receive an education. In the lower animal forms, the young are born with all their physical organs so well developed that they need, for but a short while, the care and protection of the parent. As we rise upward through the animal kingdom we find that the helplessness of the young increases and extends over a longer period. At the top of this ladder we find that the helplessness of the young increases and extends over a longer period. At the top of this ladder we find man and here in the infant babe we find the most dependent creature of all. In him too this period of helplessness lasts longer than in any animal species.
This period between birth and the development into the adult race type had been called by psychologists the play period. The relative lengths of these periods in the scale of animal life determine the relative degree of the educability of the particular species. Thus the educability of the horse and the dog is higher than that of wild animals and that of a human being is higher than all the animal world.

BOARD OF EDUCATION
DR. W. J. PINSON Term expires 1912
W. J. MILES Term expires 1912
HUGH W. GOODWIN Term expires 1910
W. E. McRAE Term expires 1910
JUDGE NEIL MARSH Term expires 1911
B. W. REEVES Term expires 1911

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD
B. W. REEVES PRESIDENT
DR. W. J. PINSON SECRETARY

COMMITTEES
Finance
W. J. MILES, Chairman
W. E. McRAE H. W. GOODWIN
Building
DR. W. J. PINSON B. W. REEVES
Fuel
DR. W. J. PINSON

The Board meets regularly the last Saturday in each month.

FACULTY

T. C. ABBOTT,
Mathematics and French
JOHN G. PIPKIN,
History and Science
MRS. IDA Z. RILEY,
English and Literature
MISS MARY LEE,
Latin and German
MRS. HELEN HENRY,
Seventh A and Seventh B Grades
MISS RETTA BROWN,
Sixth A and Sixth B Grades
MISS EMMIE HAYS,
Fifth A and Fifth B Grades
G. S. TATUM,
Fourth A and Fourth B Grades
MISS LENA HARDY,
Third A and Third B Grades
MISS EMMA RILEY,
Second A and Second B Grades
MISS ALICE CORDELL,
First A Grade
MRS. MATTIE BRYANT,
First B Grade
MISS ELLIE TATUM,
First C and First D Grades
MISS ROBERTA ARMSTRONG,
Music
MISS BESSIE HEARON,
Music
MISS PEARL STEADMAN,
Art

CALENDAR
1909-1910
September 9 and 10 – Examination for entrance into higher standing
September 13 – Session opens.
November 25 and 26 – Thanksgiving holidays.
December 23-January 2 – Christmas holidays.
January 19-22 – Examination for first term.
January 23 – Second term begins.
May 21 – Commencement sermon.
May 24 – Final examinations begin.
May 22-27 – Commencement week.
May 27 – Class night.

Seventh A Grade
Reading: -- Graded Classics, Book VII
English: -- Scott Southworth's English Grammar, Book II. Composition of work in narration and description; types of these kinds of inventions studied in class; practical business English forms; study, Enoch Arden, Tennyson; Washington, Scudder; read, Treasure Island, Stevenson
Arithmetic:-- Smith's Advanced to page 137.
Spelling: -- Hazen's Book II, 4-8 months,7th year.
Geography: -- Frye's Grammar School, completed.
History: -- Review of History of United States and Shinn's History of Arkansas
Physiology: -- Overton's Advanced, completed.
Writing:-- Copy Book IX

HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
FIRST YEAR
English: -- Crittenden's Composition and Grammar. Original composition weekly; study of specimens of these types of invention in class; narration, description, exposition.
Literature: -- Ivanhoe, Scott; The Tale of Two Cities, Dickens; As You Like It, Shakespeare; Julius Caesar, Shakespeare; A Man Without a Country, Hale; Franklin's Autobiography.
Mathematics: -- Smith's Advanced arithmetic (first half year); Milne's elements of algebra (last half year)
Science: -- Elements of Biology, Hunter
Latin: -- Smiley and Stork's Beginner's Latin
History: -- Myers Ancient History.

SECOND YEAR
English: -- Herrick and Damon's rhetoric, chapters I-IX. Original composition work under directions of teacher, weekly.
Literature: -- Selected readings from the masterpieces of American Literature. Introduction to American Literature, Brander Matthews.
Mathematics: -- Milne's High School Algebra
Science: -- Davis' Physical Geography
Latin: -- Viri Romae, D'Ooge; study of Latin syntax
History: -- Myers Mediaeval and Modern History.

THIRD YEAR
English: -- Herrick and Damon's Rhetoric, completed. Weekly composition work.
Literature: -- Eliot's Silas Marner; Merchant of Venice, Shakespeare; Vision of Sir Launfal, Lowell; Macbeth, Shakespeare.
Mathematics: -- Milne's Plane Geometry.
Science: -- Physics for High School Students, Carhart and Chute
Latin: -- Caesar, Allen and Greenough's (four books). D'Ooge's Latin Composition, weekly.
French: -- Fraser and Squire's Grammar; conversation, Sym's Easy French Reader, La Tour de La France, Bruno (Sym's tr.)
French will be made optional with German in the Third and Fourth years of the High School. Either will be given according to the election of the class in the Third Year.
History: -- History of England, Andrews.
German: -- Joynes-Wesselhoeft, German Lesson Grammar. Reading, Guerber, Marchen and Erzahlunsen, I; Mosher, Willkommen in Deutschland; Storm, Immensee.

FOURTH YEAR
English: -- Essay writing in the four principal types of discourse. A careful study of the principles of good English. References to several texts.
Literature: -- Essay on Burns, Carlyle; Hamlet, Shakespeare; Idylls of the King, Tennyson; Speech on Conciliation of America, Burke; Washington's Farewell Address, Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration. Formal work: Halleck's History of English Literature.
Mathematics: -- Milne's solid Geometry (first half year); Wentworth's Plane Geometry (last half year).
Science: -- Elementary Study of Chemistry, McPherson and Henderson
Latin: -- Cicero's Orations (five books and one in Vergil). Latin Composition bi-weekly, Barss, Book II.
French: -- Grammar, composition, conversation, reading; Francois' Introductory French Prose Composition; About's Le Roi de Montanges; Halevy's L'Abbe Constantin; Mermee's Colomba.
History: -- Comprehensive study of United States History, Fiske; Blocher's Civil Government.
German: -- Joynes-Wesselhoeft, German Lesson Grammar; composition and conversation; Reading, Goethe, Das Marchen; Dillard, Au dem Deutschen Dicterwald; Bernhardt, Auf der Sonnenseite; Hervey, Fulda; Unter vier Augen, and Benedix; Keller, Kleider machen Leute.

Reed, an El Dorado native, teaches at El Dorado High School as well as at Southern Arkansas University in Magnolia and South Arkansas Community College.

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